A Beautiful View, But Still A Battle Zone
NPR Staff
Tuesday, September 6, 2011 at 12:01 AM
Font size: A | A | A | A |

For troops in eastern Afghanistan, the mountain view from Observation Post Mustang comes with a cost.

   

Observation Post Mustang sits high in the mountains of northeastern Afghanistan, near the Pakistan border. At an altitude of 5,600 feet, the soldiers stationed there from the Army's 2-27th Infantry Regiment have a stunning view of the Kunar River Valley far below.

But it's not all just beautiful vistas and clean mountain air. On Sunday, the forward operating base that sits in the valley below took enemy fire. NPR's David Gilkey, who is embedded with the 2-27th Infantry, photographed American soldiers as they engaged in a firefight with insurgents across the valley.

Observation Post Mustang provides a position to keep watch on the other U.S. bases in the valley below, as well as the highway that runs along the Kunar River. The area is used by insurgent fighters as a infiltration and smuggling route from Pakistan, which is just over the mountains to the west. "This is probably the most important region in Afghanistan," says Gilkey, "because it's the frontline to stop insurgents coming over border from Pakistan."

The U.S. soldiers are not up there alone. They are joined by local Afghan security forces — men from local villages — who have proven to be invaluable.

"They know the terrain, they know where people come and go from, where people should be and not be," explains Gilkey. "They sit up here with the guys from 2-27th on the top of this little tiny hilltop and provide the Afghan presence here."

That hilltop is only accessible by helicopter — there are sheer drops in every direction. So, as Gilkey points out, they really do have an eye on this important, and dangerous, part of the world. [Copyright 2011 National Public Radio]



This article is filed in: World News, Home Page Top Stories, News

Also in World News  
EU Human Rights Court Could Be Last Stop For German Claiming CIA Kidnapping
Khaled El-Masri says he was mistakenly flown to a secret prison in Afghanistan by the CIA.

Civilians Flee, Soldiers Dig In On Sudanese Frontier
The U.N. is threatening both Sudans with sanctions if they can't reverse their escalating feud.

How To Address France's New, Unmarried First Lady
France's new president was inaugurated Tuesday, and he's moving into the presidential palace with his longtime "companion." Host Michel Martin and the Beauty Shop ladies weigh in on political protocol when it comes to heads of state, politicians and their unmarried significant others.

At Trial, Serb Gen. Mladic Taunts Survivors With Throat-Cutting Gesture
Charged with 11 counts of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, he remains defiant.

Atlanta Opens New International Terminal
Officials hope the facility means more international businesses will choose to locate in Georgia.

Comments  
Post a Comment