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A Boston-based podcast that thrives in how we live. What we like to see, watch, taste, hear, feel and talk about. It’s an expansive look at our society through art, culture and entertainment. It’s a conversation about the seminal moments and sizable shocks that are driving the daily discourse.  We’ll amplify local creatives and explore  the homegrown arts and culture landscape and tap into the big talent that tours Boston along the way.

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Episodes

  • The Culture Show Podcast April 22, 2024.
  • The Culture Show Podcast April 19, 2024.
  • The Culture Show Podcast April 18, 2024.
  • The Culture Show Podcast April 17, 2024.
  • The Culture Show Podcast April 16, 2024.
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    In 2019 costume designer Ruth E. Carter won her first Academy Award for her work in the 2018 film, “Black Panther,” where she created the Afrofuturist aesthetic of Wakanda. Super-heroism clearly runs in the family. Only four years later, Ruth E. Carter became a superhero in her own right, earning her second Oscar for her work in “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever.” She made history with this win, not only as the first Black woman to receive two Academy Awards, but as the first person to win for both the original and the sequel of a movie. From the superheroes of “Black Panther” to the real-life heroes in films such as “Selma,” Ruth Carter has been creating visual universes on film and TV for thirty years. Her truly colorful career is the focus of her new book, “The Art of Ruth E. Carter: Costuming Black History and the Afrofuture from Do the Right Thing to Black Panther”.From there, we'll sit down with author Michael Cunningham. In 1999, Cunningham won the Pulitzer Prize for his novel “The Hours, ” which follows three women, in three different decades, through one day in their lives. By carefully observing that single day, Cunningham finds large emotional truths in the quiet, ordinary moments of the everyday—that in totality, seem rather epic by the final page. In his latest novel, Cunningham returns to the framework of the single day to wade around in the vagaries of human nature. Titled “Day,” the book unfolds in three acts, each set on a single day in April over three sequential years: 2019 through 2021.
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    Coming up on The Culture Show, live from the GBH studio at the Boston Public Library, it’s our arts and culture week in review. First up, the cultural influence of OJ SImpson. First, as “The Juice,” a star football player who ran through the field with almost unmatched success. Then as the actor who starred in Hertz commercials and hit movies. Finally, as the man who was acquitted in the grisly murders of his ex-wife Nicole Simpson and her companion Ron Goldman, in the “trial of the century.” From there it's total recall of the total eclipse, from regional tourism to epic traffic jams. Then it's onto Boston’s own Folk American Roots Hall of Fame and their list of inaugural inductees, from The Band to Oscar Brand.And along the way we unleash our enthusiasm for “Curb Your Enthusiasm’s” final episode.
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    Through her poetry, Tracy K. Smith probes the meaning of life, she meditates on what happens to our souls when we die, she communes with the dead. She uses poetry to explore her own role in the world as a mother, making the personal profound. Her poems also scrutinize historical racial oppression, the paradox that is the American dream, and the injustices that plague our nation. All of these themes come together in her lyrical, haunting and ultimately hopeful new book, “To Free the Captives: A Plea for the American Soul.” It is part manifesto, part memoir–and all parts mesmerizing.In 1761 a young girl crossed the Atlantic on a slave ship. Captured in West Africa, she arrived in Boston where she was purchased by John and Susanna Wheatley. They named her Phillis, after the name of the slave ship that brought her to America. They taught Phillis to read and write. Able to express herself on the page, she went on to become the first African American to publish a book of poetry. Wheatley traveled to England to promote the volume and on her voyage back to America she wrote the poem, “Ocean.”The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture recently acquired this rare, handwritten manuscript along with a trove of other texts that shed light on the life –and the life of the mind—of Phillis Wheatley. Joining us to talk about what is the largest collection of Wheatley material in public hands is Kevin Young, the Andrew W. Mellon Director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture.
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    The Korean wave makes a big splash in Boston.A new exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts is a high amp historical remix of Korean culture and pop culture. It’s a celebration of everything South Korea has to offer, from K-Pop to K-dramas, from fine art to fashion. And the dynamism of this show originates from the juxtaposition of traditional customs with the fast-paced, innovative society that South Korea is today. All that AND the opportunity to get your full K-Pop dance on–right inside the galleries. We’ll talk to the curator. From there, we’re getting off the wall with Berklee professor Tia Fuller. As the Executive Director of the upcoming Michael Jackson tribute concert, she discusses how his music resonates across generations, which includes her students.Finally, we check in with the Brockton High drama club to find out what it means to be the state champions. That’s next on The Culture Show.
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    Anthony Rapp, the actor and singer, went from being a Starbucks Barista to a Broadway star by way of the hit musical “Rent.” But, his meteoric rise was tempered by the death of Jonathan Larson, “Rent’s” 35-year-old composer and librettist who had an aortic aneurysm on the eve of the show’s debut. Then, a year later, he lost his mother to cancer.These seminal events are the making of Rapp’s one-man-show, “Without You.”Then, it’s the one-man media conglomerate: Matt Farley. For him quality IS quantity. The Danvers based singer-songwriter is prolific. He’s written, produced and recorded more than 25,000 songs. He also makes movies, hosts podcasts and writes books. How does he do it all? Stay tuned to find out.Finally, the Arnold Arboretum is springing back to life, with flowers emerging from trees and shrubs. And that includes the blossoming of their cherry trees. Joining us to talk about their upcoming cherry blossom celebration–and other signs of life at this urban oasis is Jessica Pederson, the head of public programs at the Arnold Arboretum.