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In just one week, the gas tax will go up by 3 cents a gallon and the cigarette tax by $1 a pack, allowing the state to pump billions of dollars into transportation over the next ten years. 

House Speaker Robert Deleo said the tax increases will let the state modernize its aging transportation infrastructure, and and avoid immediate fare hikes on the MBTA.

"Hopefully, you're going to see more repairs on our roads and our bridges. Hopefully you're going to see no new talk relative to the fare increases," he said. 

Deleo said the measure will also put regional transit systems on sounder financial footing. The governor vetoed the bill on Friday because he said it wasn't big enough.

Senator Patricia Jehlen, a Somerville Democrat, agreed with Patrick that there isn't sufficient funding in the bill to address all the state's transportation needs. But, she voted for it anyway.

"I don't think it's enough money, but I think it's such an important first step. And the Senate president has said before to us, we will revisit this. We will continue to see if it's the right amount and see if there are other revenue sources," she said.

Even though this isn't the legacy-defining bill the governor wanted, he has said it does enable the state to reinvest in transportation after decades of neglect.