Ten years ago WCAI first went on the air, bringing the region its own public radio station.

“How We’ve Grown: A Decade of Stories from the Cape and Islands," a new eight-part series, examines a decade of news stories from the Cape and Islands: how we were then, how we’ve changed, and where we’re going.

  

Audio links below open a player window in which all posted audio from the series is available.


Friday September 24th
"A Look Back: 10 Years of Public Radio on the Cape and Islands"
Reported by Sean Corcoran

listen Listen to the Series

In this introduction to our series, we look back at how the station came about, what the vision was for public radio for the Cape and Islands, what distinguishes WCAI from other public radio stations, and how a small public radio station in little Woods Hole built a national reputation for excellence.

 

Web Extras:

1) Extended interview with WCAI founder and executive producer Jay Allison   Listen >
2) Extended interview with WCAI station manager John Voci    Listen >
3) "The Point with Mindy Todd, a one-hour special."  Mindy Todd is joined by guests Sean Corcoran, WCAI's senior reporter, and Paul Pronovost, editor-in-chief of the Cape Cod Times, to talk about some of the top news stories of the past decades, in particular the ones that are not featured in our news series.   Listen >
4) Photo scrapbook: "WCAI Launch Party... and on through the years."   View >

 

 

Monday September 27th
"The Cape's Cancer Problem: The Hunt for the Smoking Gun"
Reported by Emily Sussman

listen Listen to the Series

In the 1980s, it became apparent that Cape Cod’s cancer rates were climbing faster than state or national averages. Why? Investigations were plenty, but answers were few. Reporter Emily Sussman explores the difficulty in pinpointing a smoking gun, as well as what Cape Codders can do to reduce their exposures to environmental contaminants.

 

Web Extras:

1) Extended interview with Silent Spring’s Julia Brody   Listen >
2) Extended interview with environmental epidemiologist Ann Aschengrau    Listen >
3) Links:

Silent Spring Institute >
Mass HEIS (Massachusetts Health and Environment System) >
2010 President’s Cancer Panel report >

 

 

Tuesday September 28
"The Military's Legacy: Cleaning Up the Water We Drink"
Reported by Elsa Partan

listen Listen to Series

Ten years ago, when the Cape and Islands NPR Station was just getting on the air, the cleanup of the water pollution from the Massachusetts Military Reservation was well underway. This year, the job is mostly done. That’s how the military sees it, anyway. And it’s how many Cape Cod residents see it. Since 1985, the Air Force has spent more than 676 million dollars in Federal Super Fund money on the clean-up, while the Army has spent about half that amount. But some people don’t agree with the government’s definition of clean, and they’re asking the question: how clean is clean enough?

  

Web Extra:

Audio Slideshow: watch the videoEarly Years on the Massachusetts Military Reservation
The MMR was founded in 1935 as a National Guard training camp. Since 1935, the northern portion has been used by the Army. The southern portion was used by the Air Force from 1935-1972.

photos courtesy of the Air Force Environmental and Readiness Center; produced by Jenny Junker and Steve Young
 

   

Wednesday September 29
"A Sober Sentence: From Crime to Rehab"
Reported by Emily Sussman

listen Listen to the Series
An estimated 85 percent of the Barnstable County jail’s inmates have committed crimes to support an addiction to drugs or alcohol. The jail’s rehabilitation program provides help to those who want it, but the nature of addiction means any slip-up could land them right back in jail again. Now, sober houses for the recently released are attempting to combat the problem of recidivism.

 

 

Web Extra:

1) Extended interview with two residents of the Pilot House   Listen > 
2) Extended interview with Barnstable County jail inmate Josh Lumbert    Listen >

  

 

Thursday September 30
"No Place for the Young: Who Will Care for the Cape's Aging Population?"
Reported by Emily Sussman

listen Listen to the Series
The number of seniors who retire to the Cape is continuing to boom, as is the population of those in the 85+ demographic. But who will take care of them in the coming years? Working families and young people have been forced out of the area because of high housing prices and a lack of social and professional opportunities, so the region stands to face a crisis in the imminent future.

Web Extras:

Extended interview with demographics expert Peter Francese  Listen > 
Links:
US Census Bureau Population & Household Statistics >
Cape Cod Commission Demographic and Economic Data >

 

Friday October 1
"The Greening of Cape Cod"
Reported by Sarah Reynolds

listen Listen to the Series 

With rising awareness of climate change and the idea of “living green,” Cape Cod residents and businesses have made some big changes over the past decade. Restaurants are recycling their oil waste, regular taxis are becoming hybrids, Chambers of Commerce are starting certification processes for green businesses, and more wind turbines are dotting the landscape. One thing is clear: Cape Cod has forged ahead and is living and thinking greener than it did just ten years ago.  

 

Monday, October 4
"Prevention in Peril: The Challenge to Keep People Housed"
Reported by Emily Sussman

listen Listen to Series   

The problem of homelessness on Cape Cod has improved during the past two decades, largely because of homelessness prevention programs that seemed to work by helping families stay in their homes and avoid the trauma of moving to a shelter. But with the state and federal aid recently cut for those programs, the Cape’s homeless advocates are fighting to reinstate their prevention dollars and keep the region from losing ground on what progress it's made.

 

Web Extra:

Cape Cod Commission's 10 Year Plan to End Homelessness >

 

Tuesday October 5
"Decision Point: Does Cape Cod Have the Will to Fix Its Nitrogen Problem?"
Reported by Emily Sussman

listen Listen to the Series

For the past decade, most towns on the Cape have been trying to solve their wastewater woes on their own, but have been slow to act because of the cost — an estimated $4 billion to $8 billion Cape-wide. In the meantime, the quality of the region’s coastal embayments has continued to decline. But the stakes are getting even higher with a major lawsuit demanding swift regulatory action.

 

Web Extra:

1) Extended interview with Cape Cod Commission Executive Director Paul Niedswiecki   Listen > 
2) Extended interview with Chris Kilian, head of the Conservation Law Foundation's Clean Water division    Listen >

 

 

 

 

Food & Wine Festival 2014 Adlob-all pages
TV Pledge: Hometown Adlob