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Free online lectures: Explore a world of ideas

Funding provided by:
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New England Aquarium

Opened on the Boston Waterfront in 1969, the New England Aquarium is one of the world’s first modern aquariums. Visitors can explore the ocean and visit thousands of marine animals in three levels of world-class exhibits. Combining education, entertainment and action to address the most challenging problems facing the ocean, the New England Aquarium aims to create a new generation of ocean stewards. Since 1972, the Aquarium has been providing free lectures and films by scientists, environmental writers, photographers and many more. Through the generosity of the Lowell Institute, the Aquarium Lecture Series is free and open to the public. Registration is requested and all programs start at 7 p.m. in the Aquarium's Simons IMAX Theatre, unless otherwise noted. Programs last approximately one hour. For more information or to join our mailing list, visit: www.neaq.org/aquariumlectures

http://www.neaq.org/

  • Postwar Afghanistan is fragile, volatile, and perilous. It is also a place of extraordinary beauty. Evolutionary Biologist Dr. Alex Dehgan arrived in the country in 2006 to build the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Afghanistan Program, and preserve and protect Afghanistan’s unique and extraordinary environment, which had been decimated after decades of war. The efforts of Dehgan, a former diplomat working for the Wildlife Conservation Society, were central to the creation of the first Afghanistan National Park Program. In his book, The Snow Leopard Project: And Other Adventures in Warzone Conservation, Dehgan takes readers through some of the most dangerous places in postwar Afghanistan as he and his team work to establish the country’s first national park, complete some of the first extensive wildlife surveys in 30 years, and act to stop the poaching of the country’s iconic endangered animals, including the snow leopard. Dehgan reflects on innovative approaches to advancing the environment and security in some of the most politically and ecologically fragile places in the world, while exploring connections between conservation and political stability. Image: [Pexels.com](http://www.pexels.com/photo/animal-big-ground-fur-33581/)
    Partner:
    New England Aquarium
  • Starting with a crash course in the history of comics, Maris Wicks takes us panel by panel through the use of cartoons and comics as a way to educate and engage readers of all ages. Journey to the jungles of Africa, inside the human body, Caribbean coral reefs, the bottom of the ocean, Antarctica, and even outer space to see how Wicks uses comics to convey general science concepts and work alongside scientists to help communicate the science behind their research. Image: Maris Wicks
    Partner:
    New England Aquarium
  • As a global conservation organization, the New England Aquarium celebrates the ocean, but also draws attention to major issues facing its ecosystems. Pollution from single-use plastic is one of the ocean’s most pressing issues. This talk highlights corporations that share a similar vision of creating solutions to plastic pollution that start by minimizing waste at the beginning of the consumption chain. They will share exactly how corporations are working toward a planet with reduced reliance on plastic. The use of plastics is everywhere—in our homes, our offices, and our oceans. This talk also draws attention to the toll the plastic manufacturing process takes on the ecosystem and on our climate. Image: (CC) [Marine debris litters a beach on Laysan Island in the Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge, where it washed ashore.](https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Beach_strewn_with_plastic_debris_(8080500982).jpg) (Susan White/USFWS)
    Partner:
    New England Aquarium
  • Naturalist Sy Montgomery counts animals among her best teachers, mentors, and friends. These creatures helped her find her passion, taught her the meaning of family, and gave her the gifts of forgiveness and gratitude. In this talk, she shared stories and images from her most recent best-seller, a memoir of the 13 animals who lent this book its title and showed her, by their example, how to be a good creature. Image: Book Cover
    Partner:
    New England Aquarium
  • Coral reefs were once thought of as indestructible, but we are now losing corals at an ever-faster pace. Halting the loss of coral reefs depends on two major lines of action: keeping global temperature rise to less than 1.5°C and actively restoring coral reefs through propagation of climate-resilient corals and “replanting” them on damaged reefs. Joanie Kleypas provides the latest information on the coral reef crisis and discusses her project in Costa Rica to raise corals and how it has changed her relationships with coral reefs and people. Image: [Pexels](http://https://www.pexels.com/photo/close-up-photo-of-coral-reef-1739807/)
    Partner:
    New England Aquarium
  • The Philippines has been described as the “center of biodiversity” because it holds a majority of the Earth’s species, a high number of which are unique to the country. However, it is also at the center of adversity as a biodiversity hotspot and has lost more than 70 percent of its original habitat.
    Partner:
    New England Aquarium
  • Three local leaders in East Boston are taking steps to engage diverse residents in activities to help foster community resilience because of climate change effects. These panelists discuss why they do their work, how it is making a positive difference, and how more people can get involved to foster community resilience. Panelists include Magdalena Ayed of Harborkeepers, Alex DeFronzo of Piers Park Sailing Center, and Kannan Thiruvengadam of Eastie Farm. Image: Eastie Farm
    Partner:
    New England Aquarium
  • Learn about the right whale, a large baleen whale found in the waters of New England. Though whale hunting is outlawed throughout most of the world, right whales are still threatened by fishing gear. They can easily become entangled in ropes and suffer serious injuries. Lobstermen Kristan Porter and John Haviland will explain the struggles fishermen face when it comes to earning a living while trying to follow regulations meant to protect marine creatures. Scientist Amy Knowlton shares her experiences tracking and studying entangled right whales. Lastly, Bycatch Program director Laurens Howle will demonstrate his team's simulation software that models how right whales interact with fishing ropes.
    Partner:
    New England Aquarium
  • Listen to a discussion with Mayor Kim Driscoll of Salem, Mayor Thomas McGee of Lynn, and Mayor Martin J. Walsh of Boston, on the harbor’s role in the regional economy, climate resilience, public access and open space, water transportation, and public health and well-being. See more conversations about a Boston Harbor for all on the [Boston Society of Architects partner page](http://forum-network.org/partner/boston-society-architectsaia/ ""), featuring a symposium on Advancing Collaborative Action.
    Partner:
    New England Aquarium
  • Pinnipeds are a diverse group of marine mammals that engender curiosity and fascination. The New England Aquarium has been working with, studying, and rescuing seals for years. This evening’s lecture gives you a closer look at the work being done to better understand the seals here at the Aquarium as well as their wild counterparts.Learn about seal disease, physiology, and population dynamics, and how knowledge of these topics helps the aquarium to protect seals.
    Partner:
    New England Aquarium