Jared Bowen shared two ways for you to get caught in act this weekend — with the lighthearted comedies "Sister Act" and "The Servant of Two Masters."

http://video.wgbh.org/video/2331188160/

Sister Act

Presented by Broadway in Boston, playing at the Boston Opera Housethrough Feb. 3.

The creators of the musical “Sister Act” undertook a big challenge. The play, which is based on the famed 1992 film starring Whoopi Goldberg, has to channel Goldberg and incorporate song — all while balancing comic relief with the play’s dark subject matter.

The play, which is set in the 1970s, follows Deloris Van Cartier, a woman who dreams of being a lounge singer. Unfortunately, her dreams are cut short when she witnesses a murder committed by her boyfriend. To avoid being his next victim, Deloris must go undercover in a convent.

At times, the balance between humor and the macabre becomes tense — like the musical number about how Deloris’ boyfriend is going to disembowel her. But despite the contrast, the play becomes a truly fun and inspiring production to watch. If you can wait patiently through the play’s rocky start, you’ll see the light at its end.

The Servant of Two Masters

 

Presented by ArtsEmerson and playing at the Paramount Center Mainstage through Feb. 10

This production is a little dose of theatrical Zoloft for us all as we struggle through the depths of January. Director Christopher Bayes and ArtsEmerson have created an utterly hilarious and wonderfully fine-tuned production of this play, which was written by Carlo Goldoni in the 18th century.

At the center of the slapstick plot is a dimwitted servant who has managed to get hired by two masters. Endeavoring to get two salaries, he strives to please both bosses — to no avail.

From the punch lines to the costumes, each piece of this production is fun and colorful. Congratulations to ArtsEmerson, as well, for incorporating so much improvisation into the production; the spontaneity helps the play’s energy stay high and the jokes fly fast. And these jokes aren’t just 18th century standbys — the cast takes aim at everything from the Green Line to Scott Brown.