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Columbia University

From its beginnings in a schoolhouse in lower Manhattan, Columbia University has grown to encompass two principal campuses: the historic, neoclassical campus in the Morningside Heights neighborhood and the modern Medical Center further uptown, in Washington Heights. Today, Columbia is one of the top academic and research institutions in the world, conducting pathbreaking research in medicine, science, the arts, and the humanities. It includes three undergraduate schools, 13 graduate and professional schools, and a school of continuing education. Columbia University is one of the world's most important centers of research and at the same time a distinctive and distinguished learning environment for undergraduates and graduate students in many scholarly and professional fields. The University recognizes the importance of its location in New York City and seeks to link its research and teaching to the vast resources of a great metropolis. It seeks to attract a diverse and international faculty and student body, to support research and teaching on global issues, and to create academic relationships with many countries and regions. It expects all areas of the university to advance knowledge and learning at the highest level and to convey the products of its efforts to the world.

http://www.columbia.edu

  • University Librarian James Neal, vice president for Information Services at Columbia University, delivers the opening remarks at the third New Media in Education Conference. Since 1999, the Columbia Center for New Media Teaching and Learning has partnered with faculty in the design, development, and assessment of projects that enhance the Columbia educational experience. The goal of the third New Media in Education Conference is to highlight some of the innovations that have evolved in this time. Columbia Center for New Media Teaching and Learning is committed to keeping pace with current developments while maintaining a reflective context, allowing the Columbia community to benefit from newly emerging pedagogical best practices.
    Partner:
    Columbia University
  • David Helfand discusses how his kernel of an idea to improve an electromagnet spectrum analogy back in 1999-2000 led to the Columbia Center for New Media Technology and Learning's (CCNMTL) substantial role in the creation of "Frontiers of Science," a new course in Columbia College's core curriculum. He outlines in detail how the Center played an instrumental role in the creation of the course text, *Scientific Habits of Mind*, and the design and execution of the course's educational principles as well as the logistics of implementing a lecture-seminar combination course for over 500 students each semester. Helfand emphasizes how CourseWorks not only allows for seamless communication and document sharing between students and faculty, but also how it allows unique collaborations amongst the faculty as the course is carried out week by week. Along with Ryan Kelsey, he also discusses the ongoing evaluation work and feedback process involved in improving the course from year to year. David Klatell discusses CCNMTL's role in helping the Graduate School of Journalism rethink its teaching practices through the use of the case study method enhanced by technology. Through a demonstration of "Building the Front Page of the Washington Post," the first case jointly created by CCNMTL and the Journalism School, he outlines how placing control of the classroom in the hands of students was an important goal for their new Master's program. He emphasizes the challenges of working with a unique group of faculty, who are typically from the professional world, as well as the effort required to build cases with real value for a field that has never tried this method of teaching. He ends by setting a goal for the creation of a new case study authoring office inside the Journalism School.
    Partner:
    Columbia University
  • Frank Moretti describes new efforts at Columbia Center for New Media Teaching and Learning (CCNMTL) to leverage multimedia adaptations of University research for use in Columbia's classes and the broader community. Susan Witte discusses Multimedia Connect, an AIDS intervention program developed at the School of Social Work, as a model for how to incorporate research for education and community settings.
    Partner:
    Columbia University
  • Columbia Center for New Media Teaching and Learning (CCNMTL) and its faculty partners discuss their collaborations in the areas of virtual fieldwork. Angela Calabrese-Barton from Teachers College, discusses her work with the Educational Multimedia Case Constructor (EMCC). She describes the elaborate cases that students explore as part of her course for urban science educators. John Zimmerman from the College of Dental Medicine discusses his use of Video Interactions for Teaching and Learning (VITAL) to help teach issues of cultural competency to first year dental students. Tazuko Shibusawa from the School of Social Work discusses her work with VITAL and other video technologies to provide models of practice for clinical practice students. Herb Ginsburg from Teachers College discusses his use of VITAL in a course on developmental math education to allow students to record and reflect on their own lessons and clinical interviews with school children.
    Partner:
    Columbia University