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Free online lectures: Explore a world of ideas

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Breman Jewish Heritage Museum

The Breman Jewish Heritage Museum explores universal themes of human dignity and respect for others through the lens of the Jewish experience. Through its archives, exhibitions, educational resources and public programs, the museum preserves, documents, and interprets Jewish life in Georgia and the Holocaust. The museum houses galleries on the Holocaust and the history of Jews in Atlanta, revolving special exhibitions, archival holdings from throughout the state of Georgia, a library of educational resources, and the Lillian and A.J. Weinberg Center for Holocaust Education.

http://www.thebreman.org/

  • Lunelle Siegel, of Temple Terrace, Florida, talks about notable Jewish Confederates, and about the process of uncovering relatives involved in the Civil War. Siegel notes that tens of thousands of Southern Jews served in the Confederacy. The United Daughters of the Confederacy is the outgrowth of many local memorial, monument, and Confederate home associations and auxiliaries to camps of United Confederate Veterans that were organized after the War Between the States. It is considered one of the oldest patriotic organizations in our country because of its connection with two statewide organizations that came into existence as early as 1890, the Daughters of the Confederacy (DOC) in Missouri and the Ladies' Auxiliary of the Confederate Soldiers Home in Tennessee. The National Association of the Daughters of the Confederacy was organized in Nashville, Tennessee, on September 10, 1894, by founders Mrs. Caroline Meriwether Goodlett of Nashville and Mrs. Anna Davenport Raines of Georgia. At its second meeting in Atlanta, GA, in 1895, the organization changed its name to the United Daughters of the Confederacy. The United Daughters of the Confederacy was incorporated under the laws of the District of Columbia on July 18, 1919. Membership is open to women no less than 16 years of age who are blood descendants, lineal or collateral, of men and women who served honorably in the Army, Navy or Civil Service of the Confederate States of America, or gave Material Aid to the Cause.
    Partner:
    Breman Jewish Heritage Museum
  • Atlanta's Juvenile Court Judge Aaron Cohn, accompanied by his daughter, Gail, discusses his book, *Memoirs of a First Generation American*. The son of Jewish immigrants who fled the Russian pogroms in 1906, Cohn came of age in a Jewish neighborhood in Columbus, GA. As a major in the 3rd Cavalry, the spearhead of XX Corps, he fought his way from Normandy across France and broke through German defenses at Metz as the Nazi army retreated. He liberated a concentration camp in Austria. After the war Cohn worked as a lawyer, coached children, and stood for religious tolerance and civil rights. He is America's longest serving juvenile court judge.
    Partner:
    Breman Jewish Heritage Museum
  • Local Atlanta writer Jessica Handler shares cultural nuances about her life story, *Invisible Sisters*, in this talk with many who share her faith.
    Partner:
    Breman Jewish Heritage Museum
  • Tosia Schneider discusses her book, *Someone Must Survive to Tell the World*, in which she describes life in Poland under Nazi occupation. Schneider spent her early childhood in an idyllic Jewish setting in a small town in Poland. The advent of Hitler and World War II destroyed that world and turned her life into unspeakable horror. All her immediate family was murdered as well as most of her extended family. In 1949, she came to the US, married, and raised a family in Atlanta. These memoirs fulfill the pledge she made to her mother in the bitter winter of 1942: to tell the world should she survive. It is also a plea to her children and grandchildren to remember the past and struggle against hatred, prejudice, and anti-Semitism.
    Partner:
    Breman Jewish Heritage Museum
  • Steve Oney talks about the conspiracy of silence that surrounded the Leo Frank lynching. Oney is author of *And The Dead Shall Rise*, the definitive book on the Leo Frank case. The Breman Museum's special exhibition *Seeking Justice: The Leo Frank Case Revisited* recounts the racially charged and tragic events surrounding the unsolved murder of Mary Phagan in 1913 and lynching of Leo Frank two years later.
    Partner:
    Breman Jewish Heritage Museum
  • Mike Luckovich, the *Atlanta Journal-Constitution*'s Pulitzer Prize winning editorial cartoonist, talks about the "hows" and "whys" of his art.
    Partner:
    Breman Jewish Heritage Museum
  • Henry Birnbrey, born in Germany, talks about his experience as a survivor of the Nazi regime. He tells about witnessing the burning of books in city squares, his life as a young Jewish school student, the arrest of his father, and his immigration to the U.S. along with 1200 other children.
    Partner:
    Breman Jewish Heritage Museum
  • Eva Friedlander, speaks about her time in Hungary as a Holocaust survivor and her time with her husband George in post-World War II Rome.
    Partner:
    Breman Jewish Heritage Museum
  • Jonathan Schneer, professor of modern British history at the Georgia Institute of Technology, discusses his book, *The Balfour Declaration: The Origins of the Arab-Israeli Conflict*. This history lesson cover the time period from 1916 to present time and shines new light on the heart of the bloody conflict. Also covered is the Sykes–Picot Agreement, a secret agreement between the governments of the UK and France.
    Partner:
    Breman Jewish Heritage Museum
  • Saba Silverman is the child of holocaust survivors from Lithuania. She tells the history of her parents struggles before, during, and after World War II.
    Partner:
    Breman Jewish Heritage Museum