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FULL SHOW: Dan Rather On 'What Unites Us'; Fight For Freedom; Twitter Troubles

Earlier this week, President Donald Trump declared “our system is designed right now that everybody should hate each other.” But is it a fixable problem? In this era of political divisiveness, it seems like we could use a message of unity more than ever —and that is exactly the aim of former CBS Evening News anchor Dan Rather’s new book, “What Unites Us: Reflections on Patriotism.” In it, he writes, “Dividing people and stoking animosity can pave a path to power .... But these divisions inevitably come at the expense of the long-term health and welfare of the nation as a whole .... As a wave of anxiety sweeps our nation, as big challenges loom before us, I feel an urgency." Dan Rather, who also hosts “The Big Interview” on AXS TV, joined Jim Braude to discuss.

It was a pre-Christmas miracle for Francisco Rodriguez and his family when the MIT custodian was temporarily released on December 21st after being detained by immigration officials for nearly six months. Rodriguez first came here illegally from El Salvador a decade go, seeking asylum after a co-worker of his was murdered. Since then, he has obeyed the letter of the law but, back in June, he reported for his regular check-in with authorities, who told him he was to return with his passport and a ticket back to El Salvador. He did as he was told and ended up being detained, missing the birth of his son, and six months in the lives of his 10 and 5-year old daughters, all U.S. citizens. It’s been three weeks since Rodriguez left the detention center but his fight is far from over. For now, his deportation is just on hold while his lawyers appeal his case for asylum. Francisco Rodriguez and his lawyer, John Bennet, of Goodwin Procter, joined Jim Braude to discuss.

Jim Braude weighs in on what turned out to be a very strange week on Twitter for MBTA CEO and General Manager Luis Ramirez.

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