The Callie Crossley Show

A production of  
  

Tue., 2/14/12
Love Poetry to Exalt, Scorn and Seduce

Love Poetry to Exalt, Scorn and Seduce
Mass Poetry FestivalWhether you're a hopeless romantic or a hardened cynic, there's a love poem for you. From the poems of antiquity, up through Shakespeare and into present day, bards have crafted paeans both honoring and lamenting the effects of romance. Poets seek the perfect words to describe the indescribable, what's most vexing and joyous and human about us. And everything - one-night stands, lifelong love, platonic admiration, regret, loathing and envy - is fair game. We'll talk about the many forms of this great tradition.

We want to hear about your favorite poems, too - you can post them on our Facebook page. Do you go in for Shakespearean sonnets? Or for the burned-out, testy ruminations of a lover scorned?

GUEST:
  Sue Weaver Schopf, associate dean for the Master of Liberal Arts program at the Harvard Extension School.

Sue Weaver Schopf's list of the love poem's many incarnations, with examples:

1.) THE TRADITIONAL LOVE POEM--WHAT WE EXPECT A LOVE POEM TO SAY

Spenser's Epithalamion
Shakespeare's "Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer's Day"
Elizabeth Barrett Browning's "How Do I Love Thee, Let Me Count the Ways"
Theodore Roethke's "I Knew a Woman"


2.) THE IRONIC REVERSAL OF THE TRADITIONAL LOVE POEM (EXPRESSING LOVE NONETHELESS)

Shakespeare's "My Mistress' Eyes Are Nothing Like the Sun"
John Frederick Nims' "Love Poem"
C. Day Lewis's "Come, Live with Me and Be My Love"


3.) SEDUCTION, DESIRE--

Emily Dickinson's "Wild Nights--Wild Nights!"
Christopher Marlowe's "The Passionate Shepherd to His Love"
John Donne's "To His Mistress Going to Bed"
Brian Patten's "Party Piece"


4.) THE FETISH POEM--

Robert Herrick's "Upon Julia's Clothes"


5.) LOVE AS A SICKNESS--

Shakespeare's "My Love Is As a Fever, Longing Still"
Robert Graves' "Symptoms of Love"


6.) REMEMBRANCE OF LOVES PAST--

David Wagoner's "The Best Slow Dancer"
William Butler Yeats' "When You Are Old"


7.) LOVE GONE BAD

Edna St. Vincent Millay's "Grown-Up"
Philip Larkin's "Talking in Bed"


8.) GOOD LOVE, AS IT SHOULD BE

Marge Piercy's "To Have without Holding"

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ABOUT THE CALLIE CROSSLEY SHOW

Thursday, July 5, 2012       Listen 897
*Originally aired 11/02/12
Walter Mosley on The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey


Walter MosleyLate last year, Walter Mosley joined us to talk about his latest novel, The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey. Mosley’s protagonist, Ptolemy Grey, is an old, ailing recluse living in a dump of a cluttered apartment. His mind, on a downward spiral of dementia, is equally cluttered with a mashup of memories: the death of his wife, the lynching of a friend, his service in World War II. Then everything changes when he’s offered a Faustian bargain—a drug that will restore his brain in exchange for a shorter life. He takes the plunge, hoping mental clarity will help him solve a murder. Though Mosley may be best known for detective novels, his writing spans all genres: literary fiction, science fiction, crime and social commentary. In The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey, Mosely uses threads from all of these styles to tell the story of mortality and morality. 

GUEST:
  Walter Mosley: writer

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