The Callie Crossley Show

A production of  
  

Mon., June 20
Summertime, and the Tanning's Easy

Summertime, and the Tanning's Easy

Tomorrow marks the official first day of summer. There's no better time to head to the beach and clock in a couple hours under the sun. Amid the revelry and relaxation, all that summer sun comes with a price tag: burns, blisters, wrinkles, skin growths, even skin cancers.

We've figured out ways to tan & tone, Botox, ink and spray our skins, but our bodies still don't know how to deal with loads of extra light we get -- the hours sitting in the sun or under the lamp, roasting away -- in pursuit of that perfect summer look. Today we're looking at both sides: the benefits of sunlight, the problems with overexposure, and the FDA's new recommendations for protecting yourself.


Are you a current sun worshipper?  A former sun bather? Are you taking extra steps to protect yourself and your children from the sun this summer? We want you to weigh in on our facebook page.


Guests:
Michael Holick is a professor of medicine, physiology and biophysics at the Boston University School of Medicine. He's the author of The Vitamin D Solution  and The UV Advantage.

Nina Jablonski is a professor and head of the Department of Anthropology at Penn State University. She's author of Skin: A Natural History.

Dr. Robin Travers is a dermatologist at the SkinCare Physicians clinic in Boston.
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ABOUT THE CALLIE CROSSLEY SHOW

Thursday, July 5, 2012       Listen 897
*Originally aired 11/02/12
Walter Mosley on The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey


Walter MosleyLate last year, Walter Mosley joined us to talk about his latest novel, The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey. Mosley’s protagonist, Ptolemy Grey, is an old, ailing recluse living in a dump of a cluttered apartment. His mind, on a downward spiral of dementia, is equally cluttered with a mashup of memories: the death of his wife, the lynching of a friend, his service in World War II. Then everything changes when he’s offered a Faustian bargain—a drug that will restore his brain in exchange for a shorter life. He takes the plunge, hoping mental clarity will help him solve a murder. Though Mosley may be best known for detective novels, his writing spans all genres: literary fiction, science fiction, crime and social commentary. In The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey, Mosely uses threads from all of these styles to tell the story of mortality and morality. 

GUEST:
  Walter Mosley: writer

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