The Callie Crossley Show 6/28/12

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The Callie Crossley Show 6/29/12

The Callie Crossley Show 6/29/12

The Callie Crossley Show Podcast

Week in Review
We look at the headlines that flew under the radar this week. Among the local headlines, a civic group gives a resounding no to an 80 foot tall eyesore and Boston Democrats show some love.

GUESTS:
  Peter Kadzis: executive editor of The Boston Phoenix
  Gintautas Dumicus: vice president and editorial page editor of The Providence Journal
  Sue O'Connell: co-publisher of Bay Windows and The South End News


Let's Do the Time Warp (Never) Again!

The AMC Loews Harvard Square Theatre is closing. What does this mean for Rocky Horror fans and neighboring movie houses?


GUEST:
   Garen Daly: film critic

The Callie Crossley Show 6/28/12

The Callie Crossley Show 6/28/12

The Callie Crossley Show Podcast

The Gavel Comes Down on Government
pub dom
It’s judgment day. The Supreme Court’s ruling on President Obama’s health care reform has huge implications for the presidential race. The legal challenge has highlighted two fundamentally different views of what the role of government should be: big or small. It’s an ideological divide that now definitively distinguishes Obama from Mitt Romney. Obama’s goal of insuring health care for all came by way of his controversial individual mandate—a mandate that has been a cornerstone of Romney’s attacks on Obama. We’ll look at how this ruling will play out on the campaign trail and in the voting booths this fall.

GUESTS:
  Arnie Arnesen: political analyst, tv and radio commentator
  Robert Whitcomb: vice president and editorial page editor of The Providence Journal


Code Red for Health Care
Healthcare
No matter how the U.S. Supreme Court Rules, there are still 50 million people in America who do not have health insurance. What is their fate? What is the fate of health care in Massachusetts?

GUESTS:
 Brian Rosman: research director at Health Care for All

The Callie Crossley Show 6/27/12

The Callie Crossley Show 6/27/12

The Callie Crossley Show Podcast

The Pru: A Love/Hate Story

Rising 52 floors into the sky, Boston's Prudential Tower stands as a 20th century symbol of... a life insurance company. It anchors the city's skyline, but it is derided as an architectural eyesore. In his new book, architectural historian Elihu Rubin has written the Prudential’s biography. Nearly 50 years-old, "the Pru" is hailed as the skyscraper that turned Boston into a modern city. From the spectacular view from the 52nd floor to the pulsating stream of workers and shoppers who cycle through its revolving doors, there’s no denying that this structure has forever changed Boston's form and function.

GUEST:
  Elihu Rubin: author of Insuring the City: The Prudential Center and the Postwar Urban Landscape, assistant professor of architecture and urbanism at Yale. He'll be giving a lecture about Boston's skyscrapers at the Boston Society of Architects tomorrow at 6:30PM.


60 Feet Under

Could the next great frontier for urban dwellers could be underground? The federal government is researching how versatile our subterranean is to sustain life down under. 

GUEST:
   Leon Neyfakh, writer for the Ideas section of the Boston Globe.

The Callie Crossley Show 6/15/12

The Callie Crossley Show 6/15/12

The Callie Crossley Show Podcast

Regional Week in Review
Today we hit the rewind button on the week’s news, looking at it through a regional lens, from the Bay State to the Ocean State. On the Cape the Mashpee Wampanoag are tentatively winning and in Rhode Island things are only getting worse for Curt Shilling's beleaguered 38 Studios.

GUESTS:
   Paul Pronovost, editor, The Cape Cod Times
   Arnie Arnesen, New Hampshire-based commentator
   Robert Whitcomb, vice president, editorial page editor for The Providence Journal


Ragtime
We look at the latest in pop culture: From scandal in the prop room to celeb political endorsements.

GUEST:
  Thomas Connolly, professor of English at Suffolk University
  Rachel Rubin, chair of the Department of American Studies at UMass Boston

The Callie Crossley Show 6/14/12

The Callie Crossley Show 6/14/12

The Callie Crossley Show Podcast

The History of Cheese

What do Homer’s Oddessy, slave labor, and European monasteries have in common? Cheese.

In his new book, Cheese and Culture: A History of Cheese and Its Place in Western Civilization, food scientist Paul Kindstedt traces cheese from ancient civilization to the 21st century. He not only tracks how cheese changed the arc of human history, he also examines the versatility of this dairy wonder. Turns out a pockmarked wedge of artisanal Swiss and the preternaturally shiny and smooth Kraft single are linked by milk curds that are part of cheesemaking’s 9,000 year-old history.

GUEST:
  Paul Kindstedt, author, professor at the University of Vermont in the department of Nutrition and Food Sciences

Wine, Cheese's Age-Old Friend
Boston Wine School
Jonathon Alsop
joins us to talk about why cheese and wine are such a winning duo. He'll also offer some great pairings, such as stilton and port, and reisling and smoked gouda.

GUEST:
  Jonathan Alsop, founder of the Boston Wine School

The Callie Crossley Show 6/13/12

The Callie Crossley Show 6/13/12

The Callie Crossley Show Podcast

The Boston Jazz Chronicles
Jazz. It’s African-American music. It's the music of the American experience. It's music that has some deep roots in Boston. Originating in New Orleans and proliferating in New York, the swinging snap, crackle, and pop of jazz has made an enduring mark in Beantown. From the Savoy to Storyville, its venues have been the stomping grounds for fans and the stopping grounds for jazz giants and homegrown heroes.

In his new book, The Boston Jazz Chronicles, Boston jazz historian Dick Vacca writes about Boston’s jazz scene between the late 1930s and early 1960s. It was an era where Prohibition was long forgotten, big bands were packing the dance halls, and local legends like George Wein and Father Norman O’Connor, also known as "Jazz Priest", were making an indelible mark on the way our city sounds.

GUESTS:
  Eric Jackson, host of Jazz on WGBH with Eric Jackson
  Dick Vacca, author of The Boston Jazz Chroniles: Faces, Places, Nightlife 1937-1962


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The Gavel Comes Down on Government
pub dom
It’s judgment day. The Supreme Court’s ruling on President Obama’s health care reform has huge implications for the presidential race. The legal challenge has highlighted two fundamentally different views of what the role of government should be: big or small. It’s an ideological divide that now definitively distinguishes Obama from Mitt Romney. Obama’s goal of insuring health care for all came by way of his controversial individual mandate—a mandate that has been a cornerstone of Romney’s attacks on Obama. We’ll look at how this ruling will play out on the campaign trail and in the voting booths this fall.

GUESTS:
  Arnie Arnesen: political analyst, tv and radio commentator
  Robert Whitcomb: vice president and editorial page editor of The Providence Journal


Code Red for Health Care
Healthcare
No matter how the U.S. Supreme Court Rules, there are still 50 million people in America who do not have health insurance. What is their fate? What is the fate of health care in Massachusetts?

GUESTS:
 Brian Rosman: research director at Health Care for All

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