Mon., 4/23/12: The MBTA: What Fare Hikes & Service Cuts Mean for Your Health

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THE MBTA: What Fare Hikes and Service Cuts Mean for your Health
MBTA
Facing a $159 million deficit, the MBTA has approved fare hikes across the board and service cuts across the Commonwealth. The immediate effect is that thousands of commuters will be inconvenienced. The long-term consequences could come in the form of a public health predicament. Fare hikes and service cuts will force many more people onto the road, according to a new health assessment. With this comes more traffic, more congestion, and less physical activity. This means obesity rates, air pollution, and automobile accidents will only go up. 

GUESTS:
  Eric Bourassa: director of Transportation Planning For the Metropolitan Area Planning Council
  Marianna Arcaya: manager of public health at the Metropolitan Area Planning Council; doctoral candidate at the Harvard School of Public Health.

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