History Restored: The African Meting House | Boston, MA (part 5)

Recent Episodes

Basic Black: Portraits of Purpose

Basic Black: Portraits of Purpose

Basic Black

January 30, 2015

The pictures and stories of Bostonians whose stories have been sidelined are now highlighted in a book more than 20 years in the making. Now in 107 portraits coupled with narrative profiles, the contributions of some notable Bostonians of color are preserved for all time. The book is Portraits of Purpose: A Tribute to Leadership and we’re joined by photographer Don West and writer, Kenneth Cooper.

 

Basic Black - Boston: Going for gold...

Basic Black - Boston: Going for gold...

Basic Black

January 23, 2015

Boston won the opportunity to represent the United States in a bid to host the 2024 Summer Olympics, erupting a host of opinions, with very few opinions coming down the middle, but all of them mentioning the cost.  What will be the impact good or bad, for Boston's neighborhoods?  Later in the show, we review Boston Mayor Marty Walsh¹s first State of the City address.  What do his plans mean for the future of race relations, economic development, and public safety?

 

Basic Black: Selma and the fierce urgency of now...

Basic Black: Selma and the fierce urgency of now...

Basic Black

January 16, 2015

Demonstrators shutdown 1-93 near Boston this week crippling traffic for hours, putting the black lives matter and I can't breathe protests back on the front page. The latest actions  occurred days after the opening of the critically acclaimed movie Selma.Selma's social justice campaign is on the big screen just as current protests push the conversation about race and civil rights beyond the teachable moment to a more forceful, uncomfortable demand for change.  We look at the artistry and history portrayed in Selma against a backdrop of contemporary social justice movements.

 

(Italics: from Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King’s speech at the March on Washington 1963.  Photo credit: Atsushi Nishijimi)

 

Basic Black: An urban agenda for Massachusetts

Basic Black: An urban agenda for Massachusetts

Basic Black

January 9, 2015

This week Charlie Baker was sworn in as the 72nd governor of Massachusetts, with promises of bipartisanship and a renewed economic growth agenda for the Commonwealth’s urban communities.  Later in the show we remember Senator Edward Brooke who died last week at the age of 95.

 

 

Massachusetts Republican Gov. Charlie Baker, center, acknowledges applause after taking the oath of office, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015, in the House Chamber of the Statehouse, in Boston. Mass. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

 

Basic Black: Soul Food and Soul Power

Basic Black: Soul Food and Soul Power

Basic Black

December 20, 2014

As we head into the festivities of the holiday season, we talk about the good, the bad, and the ugly of soul food.  We’re joined by Frederick Douglass Opie, author of Hog and Hominy: Soul Food from Africa to America.  Later in the show, as the #BlackLivesMatter protests continue, we pause to consider what’s next for the movement and what happens after the die-ins, the shut-downs, and the walk-outs.

 

Basic Black: Beyond the headlines this week

Basic Black: Beyond the headlines this week

Basic Black

December 12, 2014

We take a quick run through of the week’s headlines including:
- Latino representation in Boston city government leadership roles
- Pardons and commutations currently up for review in Massachusetts
- Updates on the DJ Henry case and the connection to Ferguson
- Department of Justice renewed guidelines on racial profiling
 

 

Schedule

Sunday
2/1/15 8:00 AM
WGBH World
Sunday
2/1/15 8:30 AM
WGBX 44
Sunday
2/1/15 4:00 PM
WGBH World
Friday
2/6/15 7:30 PM
WGBH 2
TBA TBA TBA TBA

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by Bridgit Brown

The Black Heritage Trail begins in the African Meeting House on Beacon Hill in Boston, Massachusetts. It also intersects, along the way, with the Boston Freedom Trail.

On Tuesday, December 6, 2011, Beverly Morgan-Welch, and the staff of The Museum of African American History rededicated the newly restored African Meeting House. This was also the building’s 205th Anniversary.

As history states, Harriet Tubman, conductor of The Underground Railroad, which ran through Beacon Hill, spoke at the African Meeting House. William Lloyd Garrison spoke tongues of fire from its stage. “A Plea for Speech” by Frederick Douglass was uttered from a lectern on the stage there as well, and many others have and will continue to speak at the African Meeting House.

I was overwhelmed with great pride and joy when I finally saw the completed project. If my words stumbled on camera, it was because my tongue, literally, cleaved to the roof of my mouth in astonishment at the beauty of the place. Not only has history been restored. It was also made.

I thank Governor Deval Patrick, Senator John Kerry, Beverly A. Morgan-Welch, the dedicated staff at the Museum of African American History, and the public for their tenacious support of this project.

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