Part Three: The Military's Legacy: Cleaning Up the Water We Drink

Recent Episodes

Part Eight Extra: Interview with Chris Kilian

Part Eight Extra: Interview with Chris Kilian

How We've Grown

Part Eight Extra: Interview with Paul Niedzwiecki

Part Eight Extra: Interview with Paul Niedzwiecki

How We've Grown

Part Eight: Decision Point: Does Cape Cod Have the Will to Fix Its Nitrogen Problem?

Part Eight: Decision Point: Does Cape Cod Have the Will to Fix Its Nitrogen Problem?

How We've Grown

Part Seven: Prevention in Peril: The Challenge to Keep People Housed

Part Seven: Prevention in Peril: The Challenge to Keep People Housed

How We've Grown

Part Six: The Greening of Cape Cod

Part Six: The Greening of Cape Cod

How We've Grown

Part Five Extra: Peter Francese Interview

Part Five Extra: Peter Francese Interview

How We've Grown

Ten years ago, when the Cape and Islands NPR Station was just getting on the air, the cleanup of the water pollution from the Massachusetts Military Reservation was well underway. This year, the job is mostly done. That’s how the military sees it, anyway. And it’s how many Cape Cod residents see it. Since 1985, the Air Force has spent more than 676 million dollars in Federal Super Fund money on the clean-up, while the Army has spent about half that amount. But some people don’t agree with the government’s definition of clean, and they’re asking the question: how clean is clean enough?

 

Food & Wine Festival 2014 Adlob-all pages