Warm Chicken Breast Spinach Salad with Champagne-Lychee Vinaigrette



Serves 4

Ingredients 

  • 3 large naturally raised chicken breasts, julienned
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 large shallots, sliced
  • 1 pint sliced button mushrooms
  • 1/4 cup fresh lychees, halved
  • 1 heaping tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 cup Champagne
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • Organic baby spinach
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • Canola oil, for cooking
  • Crusty bread, for serving

 

Directions

In a large saute pan over medium heat coated lightly with canola oil, add chicken, season and saute until cooked through, about 4-6 minutes. Remove chicken to a plate. Add about 2 tablespoons olive oil to pan and add shallots and mushrooms, season and saute until softened, about 2 minutes. Add lychees and Dijon mustard, deglaze with Champagne and reduce by 75%. Whisk in remaining olive oil, add lemon juice and chicken, and check for flavor. Pour contents of pan over spinach in a heat-proof bowl. Toss salad, garnish with freshly ground pepper and serve with crusty bread.

Read more

Scallion and Asparagus Salad



Serves 4 

Ingredients 

  • 1-1/2 pounds fresh asparagus
  • 3/4 pound scallions
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons salt or more if needed
  • 3-1/2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 3 hard-boiled eggs, peeled

 

Cooking the Vegetable

Snap off the hard stubs at the bottom of the asparagus stalks—they’ll break naturally at the right point. With a vegetable peeler, shave off the skin from the bottom 3-inches or so each stalk so they cook evenly.


Trim the root end of the scallions and the wilted ends of the green leaves. Peel off the loose layers at the white end, too, so the scallions are all tight, trim, and about 6-inches long.

In a wide deep skillet bring one quart of water (or enough to cover the vegetables) to a boil and add the asparagus and scallions.

Adjust the heat to maintain a bubbling boil and poach the asparagus, uncovered, for about 6 minutes, or more, until they are tender but not falling apart and cooked through but not mushy. To check doneness, pick up a spear in the middle with tongs: it should be a little droopy, but not collapsing.

As soon as they are done, lift out the vegetables with tongs and lay them in a colander (any fat asparagus spears may take a little longer so leave them in a few minutes more). Hold the colander under cold running water to stop the cooking. Drain briefly, then spread on kitchen towels and pat dry.

Making the Salad

Slice the asparagus and the scallions into 1-inch lengths and pile them loosely in a mixing bowl. Drizzle over the oil and vinegar over, sprinkle on ½ of the teaspoon salt and several grinds of black pepper. Toss well but don’t break up the vegetables.


Quarter the eggs into wedges and slice each wedge into 2 or 3 pieces; scatter these in the bowl and fold in with the vegetables. Taste and adjust the dressing. Chill the salad briefly, then arrange it on a serving platter or on salad plates.

Read more

Tomatoes and Panzanella



They're red. They're round. They’re juicy and delicious, and you’ve just got to have them! Tomato-time is here! I know you know how to make a great tomato salad, but how about a panzanella? No, it’s not a dance. It’s a great, yet simple, Tuscan tomato-bread salad. It’s a great way to use day-old bread and save yourself a little dough!

Read more

Sauteed Fiddlehead Ferns



This time of year is a transitional one for local ingredients, so we turned to Josh Ziskin, chef and owner of the Italian-inspired La Morra restaurant in Brookline. The end of winter through spring can be a challenging time to write a menu, so he sticks closely to what is locally available — and right now, that means fiddlehead ferns.

Read more

Lidia’s Pasta



You may not know what you want to cook tonight but just take me to your cupboard, and together we’ll make a quick and delicious pasta dish.

Read more

Strawberries Jupiter



Why would anyone in New England eat a strawberry in February? I wait all year for strawberries. I know the season is brief, but I eat my fill. I bake pies and tarts. I make jam. I eat them out of hand. I make ice cream. I freeze them. It’s one of the season’s greatest gifts. There’s nothing like a tart, or this wonderful recipe for Strawberries Jupiter, made with ruby-red strawberries still warm from the sun, just bursting with sweet juice!

Read more

Roasted Chicken with Beer



Everyone likes a good beer now and then, and not only to drink. I like to cook with it. As much as Italians love their wine, a good beer is enjoyed every now and then, and it’s even used in cooking — so next time you’re roasting chicken, think of adding some beer to it.

Read more

Zesty Applesauce



Everyone loves a good applesauce. So why don't you try the zesty version straight from Northern Italy? I know that once you have tasted this dish, a recipe found in my cookbook, Lidia Cooks from the Heart of Italy, you will never go back to the plain applesauce.

Read more

Asian Pistou Dumplings in Lime Broth



Some of China’s smallest treasures are also its tastiest — dim sum — those savory little dumplings filled with meat, seafood, and vegetables. And they translate well to Western cuisine because they make great hors d’oeuvres. Today, however, we serve up a vegetarian soup version in my Asian Pistou Dumplings in Lime Broth. Let’s get cooking.

Read more

Spicy Wok Clams and Leeks



When I come across a flavor I really love, I like to spread it around, and the best way to spread the great flavor of Indonesia’s spicy sambal is with crème fraiche, the French multitasker that also mellows sambal’s heat — which you will see in todays’ recipe: Spicy Wok Clams and Leeks, an all-in-one seafood dish with a nuance of bacon and garlic.

Read more

Baked Penne & Mushrooms



A great family-style dish from Lidia Bastianich!

Read more

Thai Curried Clams and Chorizo



Not only do I look to the East and the West for sources of inspiration, I also look to the past for great ingredients about which we may have forgotten…like buttermilk, which used to be a staple in American kitchens. It’s not only a lighter alternative to cream, but also to Asian coconut milk, as I’ll show you today with my Thai Curried Clams and Chorizo. It’s a great one-pot-meal that features a clams and sausage combo that’s well-loved in both the East and West.

Read more

myWGBH

Forgot your my WGBH Password?

Not a problem. Just enter the username you used to register below.


Or CREATE A NEW ACCOUNT

Forgot your my WGBH Password?

Instructions on how to reset your Password have been sent.
Check your email to continue.

Or CREATE A NEW ACCOUNT

Forgot your my WGBH Username?

Not a problem. Just enter the email address you used to register below.


Or CREATE A NEW ACCOUNT

Forgot your my WGBH Username?

Instructions on how to reset your Username have been sent.
Check your email to continue.

Or CREATE A NEW ACCOUNT

Register for myWGBH