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Basic Black Live: The Emancipation Proclamation at 150

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

(Originally broadcast January 4, 2013.)

The Emancipation Proclamation is 150 years old this week.  Historian Eric Foner called this document one of the most important documents in American history.  Does the Emancipation Proclamation have any meaning for contemporary times?

Also, our panelists look ahead with predictions for 2013.


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Basic Black Live: What can we learn from Charles Ramsey?

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics


May 10, 2013

Earlier this week, Charles Ramsey of Cleveland, Ohio rescued three women and a six year old who had been held captive by his neighbor for a decade.  But it was the interview Ramsey gave to a reporter on the scene that day that made him an internet sensation.  Within hours, he was trending on Twitter and the subject of numerous autotune creations.

But Ramsey's two minute interview (and the later released call he placed to 911) grew into a larger examination of race, class and the media.  The stories of the abducted women have rightfully taken center stage, but questions about Ramsey's introduction to the world media remain.  This week on Basic Black, what can we learn from Charles Ramsey?
 

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Empowering Women & Girls: Nicole Roberts Jones

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Health | Politics

by Talia Whyte


Nicole Roberts Jones
was the mistress of ceremonies at Boston's 43rd annual Martin Luther King Day Breakfast.  As the old adage goes, behind every great man is an even greater woman.  Coretta Scott King played a vital role as Dr. King’s wife and organizing partner.  There were many other women who had participated in the civil rights movement, but unlike Mrs. King, Betty Shabazz and Rosa Parks, their accomplishments have been given little attention.

Ella Baker, Septima Poinsette Clark, Fannie Lou Hamer and Vivian Malone Jones are all unsung heroines from that era.  Baker was a longtime organizer for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) who worked behind the scenes.  Because she was neither a man nor a minister, she was not seriously considered to become the head of the organization.  Clark, better known as the “queen mother” of the civil rights movement, was an educator who played a role in a legal victory that would allow blacks to become principals in public schools in Charleston, South Carolina.  Hamer was a Mississippi sharecropper, who was beaten and jailed in 1962 for trying to register to vote.  She co-founded the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and spoke at the 1964 Democratic National Convention.  Jones defied Gov. George Wallace by becoming one of the first black students to enroll at the University of Alabama in 1963.

And there were countless other women, who are unknown, but worked tirelessly cooking meals and cleaning up after rallies.  These women should be the main role models for today’s black women, not stars on reality shows.   

While no woman gave a speech at the 1963 March on Washington, it seems like their accomplishments are now being recognized.  Myrlie Evers-Williams delivered the invocation at President Obama’s inauguration – the first ever done by a woman and layperson.

“There’s a Chinese saying, ’Women hold up half the world,” said former NAACP chairman Julian Bond. “In the case of the civil rights movement it’s probably three-quarters of the world.”

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History Restored: The African Meeting House | Boston, MA (part 3)

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

The third in a five part series on the restoration of the African Meeting House on Beacon Hill in Boston, MA.
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Youth Fighting Fat (Part Two): "Soda-Free Kids"

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Education | Health

Part two of a three-part series by Talia Whyte

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Voices From "The State of Black Boston"

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Business | Education | Health | Politics

Talia Whyte spoke to attendees at the release of "The State of Black Boston" report during the kickoff to the National Urban League Convention 2011.
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Boston: Perceptions Beyond Race (Nat’l Urban League 2011)

Black Boston | Politics

Talia Whyte spoke to out of town visitors at National Urban League conference about their perceptions of Boston.
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"We Saved A Community"

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

by Talia Whyte

State Rep. Byron Rushing joined local community activists at Hibernian Hall Oct. 19 to discuss the history of the 45-year-old Madison Park Development Corporation, as well as highlight the roots of black activism in Boston.
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Anonymous: When Words Become Weapons

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Health | Politics

Basic Black contributor Bridgit Brown spoke to families whose lives have been scarred by both violence and the careless language of the media.
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A Conversation with Issa Rae: The Mis-Adventures of Awkward Black Girl

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

Contributor Talia Whyte comments on the web series, The Mis-Adventures of Awkward Black Girl:  "The sudden success of “Awkward Black Girl” says a lot about not only the potential of viral video and good old-fashioned word of mouth, but also a growing desire among people of color to see better portrayals of their communities in the media"  She caught a few minutes with the series creator, Issa Rae. more

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