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Basic Black Live: Political and Cultural News Opening 2011

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

(Originally broadcast January 6, 2011) On this episode of Basic Black, we take a look at the work ahead for President Obama and the new Congressional Republican leadership. We'll also discuss early developments in the race for the Boston City Council seat being vacated by Chuck Turner, the sentencing of former State Senator Dianne Wilkerson, Huckleberry Finn and the n-word, the "redemption" of Michael Vick, and the release of the Scott sisters in Mississippi.


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Basic Black Live: The War Between the States and Sharpton v. West

Arts & Culture | Politics


(Originally broadcast on April 15, 2011) 

This week marks the official beginning of ceremonies marking the 150th Anniversary of The Civil War. How should African Americans look at the commemorations and historical re-tellings to come? Also, we'll examine the heated exchange between Rev. Al Sharpton and Cornel West over Barack Obama's leadership and whether he's done enough for communities of color.
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Basic Black Live: The Death of Osama Bin Laden

Black Boston | Politics

(Originally broadcast on May 6, 2011) This week: a discussion the death of Osama bin Laden and whether it has changed the conversation about Barack Obama’s foreign policy and military leadership, as well as his standing in the 2012 election.


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Basic Black Live: The High Stakes of Race & Leadership

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics


(Originally broadcast on July 8, 2011)

Mayor William "Willy" Lantigua of Lawrence, MA is the subject of a recall effort which is gaining momentum. Many in the Latino community are deeply embarrassed by the entire situation, but should they be? From the White House to the State House, should communities of color hold their leaders to a different standard?

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Basic Black Live: New Protests, New Leadership

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics


(Originally broadcast on January 13, 2012)

As we head towards the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday, we look back at the past year of protest at home and abroad. In the era of the civil rights movement, much of the attention focused on the leadership; but in this new era of protests, the focus has shifted to the masses. Have leaders become obsolete? Our conversation this week on Basic Black looks at the new role of leadership in grassroots movements, from the Tea Party to the Arab Spring to Occupy.


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Basic Black: Post Debate Wrap-Up

Black Boston | Politics


Originally broadcast October 19, 2012.

Basic Black kicks off its new season in the midst of the 2012 presidential campaign. Our conversation takes a look at the most recent presidential and vice presidential debates. For some it’s about who won or lost, but what matters most is how each candidate plans to meet the challenges of leadership.


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Basic Black Live - The Black Church: The Call to Heal, Serve, and Transform

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics


(Originally broadcast December 14, 2012)

Black churches routinely discuss both scripture and issues  like gay marriage and voter suppression,and gun violence. Today’s tragic shooting in Connecticut is a fresh reminder of the ever present  violence assaulting so many black communities. What role has the black church played in dealing with the violence?  We'll look at that and examine the church's influence in shaping  opinion about current issues of the day.

Has the church become too political, or not political enough?  Has this institution re-invented itself in order to adequately meet the challenges of changing communities around it?


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Basic Black Live: What is "Black Leadership?"

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

January 18, 2013


As we approach the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday and President Obama’s second inauguration, Basic Black looks at the significance of leadership, and specifically the notion of "black leadership."  Questions on the table include:  Is black leadership a reality?  Is the idea of a black leadership outdated?  What should a contemporary black leadership look like?



(Photo by Pete Souza: A view from the back of President Obama's chair, July 2012.)
 

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Empowering Women & Girls: Nicole Roberts Jones

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Health | Politics

by Talia Whyte


Nicole Roberts Jones
was the mistress of ceremonies at Boston's 43rd annual Martin Luther King Day Breakfast.  As the old adage goes, behind every great man is an even greater woman.  Coretta Scott King played a vital role as Dr. King’s wife and organizing partner.  There were many other women who had participated in the civil rights movement, but unlike Mrs. King, Betty Shabazz and Rosa Parks, their accomplishments have been given little attention.

Ella Baker, Septima Poinsette Clark, Fannie Lou Hamer and Vivian Malone Jones are all unsung heroines from that era.  Baker was a longtime organizer for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) who worked behind the scenes.  Because she was neither a man nor a minister, she was not seriously considered to become the head of the organization.  Clark, better known as the “queen mother” of the civil rights movement, was an educator who played a role in a legal victory that would allow blacks to become principals in public schools in Charleston, South Carolina.  Hamer was a Mississippi sharecropper, who was beaten and jailed in 1962 for trying to register to vote.  She co-founded the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and spoke at the 1964 Democratic National Convention.  Jones defied Gov. George Wallace by becoming one of the first black students to enroll at the University of Alabama in 1963.

And there were countless other women, who are unknown, but worked tirelessly cooking meals and cleaning up after rallies.  These women should be the main role models for today’s black women, not stars on reality shows.   

While no woman gave a speech at the 1963 March on Washington, it seems like their accomplishments are now being recognized.  Myrlie Evers-Williams delivered the invocation at President Obama’s inauguration – the first ever done by a woman and layperson.

“There’s a Chinese saying, ’Women hold up half the world,” said former NAACP chairman Julian Bond. “In the case of the civil rights movement it’s probably three-quarters of the world.”

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A Conversation with Issa Rae: The Mis-Adventures of Awkward Black Girl

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

Contributor Talia Whyte comments on the web series, The Mis-Adventures of Awkward Black Girl:  "The sudden success of “Awkward Black Girl” says a lot about not only the potential of viral video and good old-fashioned word of mouth, but also a growing desire among people of color to see better portrayals of their communities in the media"  She caught a few minutes with the series creator, Issa Rae. more

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