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Basic Black: Urban Renaissance

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Business | Politics

April 10, 2015

It wouldn't be a stretch to say that Dudley Square is experiencing something of a renaissance.  The dedication of the Bruce C. Bolling Municipal Building and the re-opening of Tropical Foods grocery store are the latest examples of what is hoped to be the beginnings of an economic turnaround for Roxbury and Mattapan.  We’ll talk about  Mayor Walsh’s plans with two chiefs in his administration: John Barros and Daniel Koh. 

Later in the show, in South Carolina and closer to home, a shift in official police responses to the deaths of African American men at the hands of law enforcement.

 

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A Conversation with U-Meleni Mhlaba-Adebo: Marathoner and Fitness Advocate

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Health | Politics

April 18, 2014

U-Meleni Mhlaba-Adebo has been running since she was a school girl in Zimbabwe and South Africa.  She continued to run when she came to Massachusetts for college.  U-Meleni is not unlike an evangelist when it comes to encouraging people of color (folks of all walks) to run and experience the benefits of working out.  In fact, her son can boast of winning medals in his own right at the tender age of three.  In 2012, U-Meleni ran the Boston Marathon as a way of processing her feelings upon learning that her mother had cancer and to raise money for a local school.  This year, U-Meleni is thankful that her mother is cancer-free, and she’ll be on the side-lines to cheer her brother-in-law as he runs the 118th Boston Marathon.



(Music: Reverie (small theme) by _ghost)

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Looking at the 2010 World Cup from Boston

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

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The World Cup and Soccer in the US

Arts & Culture | Health | Politics

Basic Black contributor Talia Whyte caught up with Alex Scott of the Boston Breakers to get a few thoughts on soccer in the US...

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A Conversation with Nelson George

Arts & Culture | Politics

An interview with author Nelson George.

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History Restored: The African Meeting House | Boston, MA (part 2)

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

The second in a five part series on the restoration of the African Meeting House on Beacon Hill in Boston, MA.
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Empowering Women & Girls: Nicole Roberts Jones

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Health | Politics

by Talia Whyte


Nicole Roberts Jones
was the mistress of ceremonies at Boston's 43rd annual Martin Luther King Day Breakfast.  As the old adage goes, behind every great man is an even greater woman.  Coretta Scott King played a vital role as Dr. King’s wife and organizing partner.  There were many other women who had participated in the civil rights movement, but unlike Mrs. King, Betty Shabazz and Rosa Parks, their accomplishments have been given little attention.

Ella Baker, Septima Poinsette Clark, Fannie Lou Hamer and Vivian Malone Jones are all unsung heroines from that era.  Baker was a longtime organizer for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) who worked behind the scenes.  Because she was neither a man nor a minister, she was not seriously considered to become the head of the organization.  Clark, better known as the “queen mother” of the civil rights movement, was an educator who played a role in a legal victory that would allow blacks to become principals in public schools in Charleston, South Carolina.  Hamer was a Mississippi sharecropper, who was beaten and jailed in 1962 for trying to register to vote.  She co-founded the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and spoke at the 1964 Democratic National Convention.  Jones defied Gov. George Wallace by becoming one of the first black students to enroll at the University of Alabama in 1963.

And there were countless other women, who are unknown, but worked tirelessly cooking meals and cleaning up after rallies.  These women should be the main role models for today’s black women, not stars on reality shows.   

While no woman gave a speech at the 1963 March on Washington, it seems like their accomplishments are now being recognized.  Myrlie Evers-Williams delivered the invocation at President Obama’s inauguration – the first ever done by a woman and layperson.

“There’s a Chinese saying, ’Women hold up half the world,” said former NAACP chairman Julian Bond. “In the case of the civil rights movement it’s probably three-quarters of the world.”

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Don West, Boston's Photographer

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

Don West has documented some of the most signigicant events and people in Boston's black community for over 25 years.

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Keith Morris Washington on Lynching

Arts & Culture | Politics

Artist Keith Morris Washington talks about his series of paintings on lynchings.

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The Indignity of Apartheid - 1973

Politics

In this clip Aggrey Mbere, a South African, explains what conditions are like in his country.
 

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