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Basic Black After The Broadcast: Iconic women of "black prophetic fire"

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

October 24, 2014

After the broadcast, the conversation turned to an examination of iconic African American women Cornel West highlighted in his book, Black Prophetic Fire, as well as the question of West and his hopes for his legacy in social justice.

 

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Basic Black After The Broadcast: Gender and Generations of Islam in America

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

January 15, 2016

After the broadcast the conversation turned to the issues of women in Islam, generational differences among Muslims, and the relationship of African American Muslims to the Nation of Islam.

 

Photo: Muslim women attend Jum'a, the Friday prayer, at the All Dulles Area Muslim Society (ADAMS) Center in Sterling, Va., Friday, Dec. 18, 2015. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)

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Basic Black: Breast Cancer and Women of Color

Black Boston | Health

October 29, 2016

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month.  According to a report from the American Cancer Society, “Cancer Facts & Figures for African Americans 2016-2018,” breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among black women, and an estimated 30,700 new cases are expected to be diagnosed in 2016.  The diagnosis for African American women is often later and the disease is much more advanced and deadly. WGBH News’ Tina Martin sits down with doctors and survivors to discuss health care treatment options, survivor stories and day-to-day living. 

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Basic Black: Breast Cancer and Women of Color

Black Boston | Health

October 29, 2016

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month.  According to a report from the American Cancer Society, “Cancer Facts & Figures for African Americans 2016-2018,” breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among black women, and an estimated 30,700 new cases are expected to be diagnosed in 2016.  The diagnosis for African American women is often later and the disease is much more advanced and deadly. WGBH News’ Tina Martin sits down with doctors and survivors to discuss health care treatment options, survivor stories and day-to-day living. 

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Breast Cancer Among Black Women in Boston

Black Boston | Health

The disparity of breast cancer mortality has increased between Black and White women. What factors contribute to the increase of breast cancer among African American women? Do African American women in Boston have any specific advantages or disadvantages in terms of health care for breast cancer? 

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A Conversation with Professor Griff on the Legacy of Malcolm X

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

By Talia Whyte


Professor Griff of the legendary hip-hop group Public Enemy gave a lecture on Malcolm X's influence in today's black culture at Northeastern University's John D. O'Bryant African-American Institute February 12.

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London Bridgez and TEDx Roxbury Women 2013

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Health | Politics

By Talia Whyte

The second annual TEDxRoxburyWomen conference was held at UMASS Boston on December 6, with a fabulous roster of local, up and coming women speakers sharing their big ideas. 

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Cecile Musanase and the Akilah Institute

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

October 25, 2013

By Talia Whyte

Cecile Musanase and fellow student Julian Kankunda were speakers at the Akilah Institute’s Metropolitan Safari fundraiser held at the Museum of African American History Oct. 10.  The Akilah Institute for Women is a college that offers market-relevant education with campuses in Kigali, Rwanda and Bujumbura, Burundi.  Since it’s opening in 2010, it has made an important impact on education and training for women in Africa.


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Julian Kankunda and the Akilah Institute

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

October 25, 2013

By Talia Whyte

Julian Kankunda and fellow student Cecile Musanase were speakers at the Akilah Institute’s Metropolitan Safari fundraiser held at the Museum of African American History Oct. 10.  I was very impressed with
both young ladies and the work of the Institute.  Kankunda and Musanase are both from Rwanda, a country that has come a long way since the genocide that plagued it 20 years ago.  During the Rwandan
genocide, women were targets for rape, mutilation of reproductive capabilities and other forms of sexual violence.

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Empowering Women & Girls: Nicole Roberts Jones

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Health | Politics

by Talia Whyte


Nicole Roberts Jones
was the mistress of ceremonies at Boston's 43rd annual Martin Luther King Day Breakfast.  As the old adage goes, behind every great man is an even greater woman.  Coretta Scott King played a vital role as Dr. King’s wife and organizing partner.  There were many other women who had participated in the civil rights movement, but unlike Mrs. King, Betty Shabazz and Rosa Parks, their accomplishments have been given little attention.

Ella Baker, Septima Poinsette Clark, Fannie Lou Hamer and Vivian Malone Jones are all unsung heroines from that era.  Baker was a longtime organizer for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) who worked behind the scenes.  Because she was neither a man nor a minister, she was not seriously considered to become the head of the organization.  Clark, better known as the “queen mother” of the civil rights movement, was an educator who played a role in a legal victory that would allow blacks to become principals in public schools in Charleston, South Carolina.  Hamer was a Mississippi sharecropper, who was beaten and jailed in 1962 for trying to register to vote.  She co-founded the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and spoke at the 1964 Democratic National Convention.  Jones defied Gov. George Wallace by becoming one of the first black students to enroll at the University of Alabama in 1963.

And there were countless other women, who are unknown, but worked tirelessly cooking meals and cleaning up after rallies.  These women should be the main role models for today’s black women, not stars on reality shows.   

While no woman gave a speech at the 1963 March on Washington, it seems like their accomplishments are now being recognized.  Myrlie Evers-Williams delivered the invocation at President Obama’s inauguration – the first ever done by a woman and layperson.

“There’s a Chinese saying, ’Women hold up half the world,” said former NAACP chairman Julian Bond. “In the case of the civil rights movement it’s probably three-quarters of the world.”

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