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Basic Black Live: The Black Church, Hip Hop and Gay Marriage

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics


(Originally broadcast on June 1, 2012)

From President Obama’s support of same sex marriage to the dominating influence of hip hop culture, the black church finds itself on the front page of a national conversation about its identity, relevance, and impact. Will support for Obama's presidential bid fade in the upcoming election? Has the church adequately addressed the needs of a younger generation? Is this an opportunity for new voices to emerge in the evolution of the black church?

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Basic Black Live: The Black Church, Hip Hop and Gay Marriage

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics


(Originally broadcast on June 1, 2012)

From President Obama’s support of same sex marriage to the dominating influence of hip hop culture, the black church finds itself on the front page of a national conversation about its identity, relevance, and impact. Will support for Obama's presidential bid fade in the upcoming election? Has the church adequately addressed the needs of a younger generation? Is this an opportunity for new voices to emerge in the evolution of the black church?

more

Basic Black After The Broadcast: Will Ambassador Susan Rice be the next Secretary of State?

Black Boston | Politics


Originally streamed December 7, 2012.

Ambassador Susan E. Rice, the U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations, has emerged as President Obama's leading candidate for Secretary of State.  But her potential nomination has erupted in controversy.  Congressional leaders in the Republican party have come out in strong opposition to her nomination while Rice's defenders, including the President are unwavering in their support.  What are the real underlying issues surrounding this controversy?

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Basic Black: Beyond Locker Room Smack Talk

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics


November 22, 2013

Repercussions from the Jonathan Martin/Richie Incognito incident continue to roll out. Was Jonathan Martin strong for walking away from the Miami Dolphins, or was he not "strong enough" to stay? Our conversation explores how the intersection of sports and race influence our cultural notions of African American manhood.


(Photo: Associated Press.)

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Basic Black: Beyond Locker Room Smack Talk

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics


November 22, 2013

Repercussions from the Jonathan Martin/Richie Incognito incident continue to roll out. Was Jonathan Martin strong for walking away from the Miami Dolphins, or was he not "strong enough" to stay? Our conversation explores how the intersection of sports and race influence our cultural notions of African American manhood.


(Photo: Associated Press.)

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Basic Black: Feminism Isn't Black and White

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

December 20, 2013

This week on Basic Black, our first conversation examines the recent media coverage of Michelle Obama and the meaning of feminism to women of color.  An article in Politico dubbed the First Lady as a "feminist nightmare" while later coverage characterized her as the "angry black woman" when the President took a selfie with Danish prime minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt at the funeral of Nelson Mandela.  Both episodes illustrated the great divide between black and white women on the issue of feminism , with many African American commentators saying, in essence, "your feminism ain't like mine…"



(Photo:  First Lady Michelle Obama introducing President Barack Obama before his address to injured veterans and guests on the critical issues facing veterans during the DAV National Convention in Orlando, Fla. Michelle Obama is taking her “Let’s Move!” campaign to Arthur Ashe Kids Day. AP Photo/Julie Fletcher - Aug. 10, 2013, File)

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Basic Black After The Broadcast: Is Valentine's Day About Love?

Arts & Culture | Black Boston

February 14, 2014

After the broadcast, a conversation on the meaning of Valentine's Day...the good, the bad, and the ugly (and because it's Basic Black...the political, historical, and gender differences in the meaning of the day!)


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Basic Black: Feminism Isn't Black and White

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

December 20, 2013

This week on Basic Black, our first conversation examines the recent media coverage of Michelle Obama and the meaning of feminism to women of color.  An article in Politico dubbed the First Lady as a "feminist nightmare" while later coverage characterized her as the "angry black woman" when the President took a selfie with Danish prime minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt at the funeral of Nelson Mandela.  Both episodes illustrated the great divide between black and white women on the issue of feminism , with many African American commentators saying, in essence, "your feminism ain't like mine…"



(Photo:  First Lady Michelle Obama introducing President Barack Obama before his address to injured veterans and guests on the critical issues facing veterans during the DAV National Convention in Orlando, Fla. Michelle Obama is taking her “Let’s Move!” campaign to Arthur Ashe Kids Day. AP Photo/Julie Fletcher - Aug. 10, 2013, File)

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Empowering Women & Girls: Nicole Roberts Jones

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Health | Politics

by Talia Whyte


Nicole Roberts Jones
was the mistress of ceremonies at Boston's 43rd annual Martin Luther King Day Breakfast.  As the old adage goes, behind every great man is an even greater woman.  Coretta Scott King played a vital role as Dr. King’s wife and organizing partner.  There were many other women who had participated in the civil rights movement, but unlike Mrs. King, Betty Shabazz and Rosa Parks, their accomplishments have been given little attention.

Ella Baker, Septima Poinsette Clark, Fannie Lou Hamer and Vivian Malone Jones are all unsung heroines from that era.  Baker was a longtime organizer for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) who worked behind the scenes.  Because she was neither a man nor a minister, she was not seriously considered to become the head of the organization.  Clark, better known as the “queen mother” of the civil rights movement, was an educator who played a role in a legal victory that would allow blacks to become principals in public schools in Charleston, South Carolina.  Hamer was a Mississippi sharecropper, who was beaten and jailed in 1962 for trying to register to vote.  She co-founded the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and spoke at the 1964 Democratic National Convention.  Jones defied Gov. George Wallace by becoming one of the first black students to enroll at the University of Alabama in 1963.

And there were countless other women, who are unknown, but worked tirelessly cooking meals and cleaning up after rallies.  These women should be the main role models for today’s black women, not stars on reality shows.   

While no woman gave a speech at the 1963 March on Washington, it seems like their accomplishments are now being recognized.  Myrlie Evers-Williams delivered the invocation at President Obama’s inauguration – the first ever done by a woman and layperson.

“There’s a Chinese saying, ’Women hold up half the world,” said former NAACP chairman Julian Bond. “In the case of the civil rights movement it’s probably three-quarters of the world.”

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