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Basic Black: Rap, Race, Free Speech and Crimes

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

January 17, 2014

On Monday, the New York Times featured an Op-Ed entitled, "Rap Lyrics on Trial".  As the title suggests, the issue at hand is whether rap lyrics can be used as evidence of a crime.  That question will be before the New Jersey State Supreme Court next week, and there was also a case closer to home in Massachusetts a little over a year ago.  This week on Basic Black, we'll look at what happens at the intersection of rap, race, free speech, and the criminal justice system.


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Basic Black: Rap, Race, Free Speech and Crimes

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

January 17, 2014

On Monday, the New York Times featured an Op-Ed entitled, "Rap Lyrics on Trial".  As the title suggests, the issue at hand is whether rap lyrics can be used as evidence of a crime.  That question will be before the New Jersey State Supreme Court next week, and there was also a case closer to home in Massachusetts a little over a year ago.  This week on Basic Black, we'll look at what happens at the intersection of rap, race, free speech, and the criminal justice system.


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Basic Black: Free Speech and Fair Play

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

 

NOTE:  BASIC BLACK RETURNS WITH NEW CONVERSATIONS AND BROADCASTS IN THE FALL.

 

Original broadcast date: May 15, 2015

This week on Basic Black: When free speech slams into race and social media on the college campus: controversy erupts over racially-charged tweets sent by incoming Boston University sociology professor Saida Grundy. Also, in the midst of Deflategate, with domestic violence, child abuse, and drug abuse as part of professional football, we ask if the NFL really knows how to prioritize its penalties.

 

Check out Basic Black panelist and WGBH News Senior Reporter Phillip Martin's story:
Defining Domestic Terrorism Part One: Hate Groups Move Online and On Campus

 

Photo: (Left) Professor Saida Grundy, Twitter profile.  (Right) Tom Brady, January 18, 2015, (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File).

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Basic Black: Free Speech and Fair Play

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

 

NOTE:  BASIC BLACK RETURNS WITH NEW CONVERSATIONS AND BROADCASTS IN THE FALL.

 

Original broadcast date: May 15, 2015

This week on Basic Black: When free speech slams into race and social media on the college campus: controversy erupts over racially-charged tweets sent by incoming Boston University sociology professor Saida Grundy. Also, in the midst of Deflategate, with domestic violence, child abuse, and drug abuse as part of professional football, we ask if the NFL really knows how to prioritize its penalties.

 

Check out Basic Black panelist and WGBH News Senior Reporter Phillip Martin's story:
Defining Domestic Terrorism Part One: Hate Groups Move Online and On Campus

 

Photo: (Left) Professor Saida Grundy, Twitter profile.  (Right) Tom Brady, January 18, 2015, (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File).

more

Basic Black: Free Speech and Fair Play

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

 

NOTE:  BASIC BLACK RETURNS WITH NEW CONVERSATIONS AND BROADCASTS IN THE FALL.

 

Original broadcast date: May 15, 2015

This week on Basic Black: When free speech slams into race and social media on the college campus: controversy erupts over racially-charged tweets sent by incoming Boston University sociology professor Saida Grundy. Also, in the midst of Deflategate, with domestic violence, child abuse, and drug abuse as part of professional football, we ask if the NFL really knows how to prioritize its penalties.

 

Check out Basic Black panelist and WGBH News Senior Reporter Phillip Martin's story:
Defining Domestic Terrorism Part One: Hate Groups Move Online and On Campus

 

Photo: (Left) Professor Saida Grundy, Twitter profile.  (Right) Tom Brady, January 18, 2015, (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File).

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Basic Black After The Broadcast: Free Speech, Hate Speech and Campus Controversy

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

October 23, 2015

The student government of Wesleyan University voted to slash the funding of the campus newspaper by over 50% after the publication of an editorial questioning the goals of the Black Lives Matter Movement. The decision was applauded by some quarters of the student population, but in other quarters the move was seen as a clear case of censorship.

 

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Reading Frederick Douglass

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

Basic Black contributor Bridgit Brown captured the importance of Frederick Douglass during a reading sponsored by Harvard's Charles Hamilton Houston Institute outside the Massachusetts state house.

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Hip Hop Activist Rosa Clemente

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

Rosa Clemente was one of many presenters at the 2011 National Conference on Media Reform (NCMR) held in Boston April 8-10.  Clemente, who considers herself a proud “black Puerto Rican radical,” made it clear to other NCMR attendees that she dances to her own beat and doesn’t care who likes it.


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Empowering Women & Girls: Nicole Roberts Jones

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Health | Politics

by Talia Whyte


Nicole Roberts Jones
was the mistress of ceremonies at Boston's 43rd annual Martin Luther King Day Breakfast.  As the old adage goes, behind every great man is an even greater woman.  Coretta Scott King played a vital role as Dr. King’s wife and organizing partner.  There were many other women who had participated in the civil rights movement, but unlike Mrs. King, Betty Shabazz and Rosa Parks, their accomplishments have been given little attention.

Ella Baker, Septima Poinsette Clark, Fannie Lou Hamer and Vivian Malone Jones are all unsung heroines from that era.  Baker was a longtime organizer for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) who worked behind the scenes.  Because she was neither a man nor a minister, she was not seriously considered to become the head of the organization.  Clark, better known as the “queen mother” of the civil rights movement, was an educator who played a role in a legal victory that would allow blacks to become principals in public schools in Charleston, South Carolina.  Hamer was a Mississippi sharecropper, who was beaten and jailed in 1962 for trying to register to vote.  She co-founded the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and spoke at the 1964 Democratic National Convention.  Jones defied Gov. George Wallace by becoming one of the first black students to enroll at the University of Alabama in 1963.

And there were countless other women, who are unknown, but worked tirelessly cooking meals and cleaning up after rallies.  These women should be the main role models for today’s black women, not stars on reality shows.   

While no woman gave a speech at the 1963 March on Washington, it seems like their accomplishments are now being recognized.  Myrlie Evers-Williams delivered the invocation at President Obama’s inauguration – the first ever done by a woman and layperson.

“There’s a Chinese saying, ’Women hold up half the world,” said former NAACP chairman Julian Bond. “In the case of the civil rights movement it’s probably three-quarters of the world.”

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History Restored: The African Meeting House | Boston, MA (part 1)

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

The first in a five part web series chronicling the restoration of The African Meeting House on Beacon Hill in Boston, MA.
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