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The Case for Black With a Capital B

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Basic Black After The Broadcast: Enforcement And Empathy

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

April 10, 2015

After the broadcast the conversation continued with a discussion of a comparison between the official responses to police shootings (down south and closer to home) before and after the death of Walter Scott in North Charleston, SC.


 

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Basic Black - Charleston, SC: Remember Their Names...

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

June 26, 2015

This week on Basic Black, we turn to the horrific murders in Charleston, SC and examine the impact on social justice movements and conversations around race in the wake of the Charleston massacre. The conversation continues as the city mourns those who lost their lives to senseless violence and virulent racism: Depayne Middleton Doctor, Cynthia Hurd, Susie Jackson, Ethel Lance, Rev. Clementa Pinckney, Tywanza Sanders, Rev. Dr. Daniel Simmons, Sr., Sharonda Coleman-Singleton, and Myra Thompson.

 

Photo: Terri Barr, of Columbia, S.C., stands silently against a fence while visiting a sidewalk memorial in memory of the shooting victims in front of Emanuel AME Church Monday, June 22, 2015, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

 

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Basic Black: The Year of the Gun

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

December 18, 2015

This year has been tragically and persistently the year of the gun. But gun violence is nothing new in communities of color; we’ll take a look at the impact of potential reforms and the resistance to such reforms. The long-awaited Star Wars movie opens on December 18. In the run up to the premiere, controversy swirled around the fact that one of the main characters is black. We’ll take a look at the meaning of characters of color in science fiction.


 


(AP Photo/Princes Georges Police)

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Basic Black - Charleston, SC: Remember Their Names...

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

June 26, 2015

This week on Basic Black, we turn to the horrific murders in Charleston, SC and examine the impact on social justice movements and conversations around race in the wake of the Charleston massacre. The conversation continues as the city mourns those who lost their lives to senseless violence and virulent racism: Depayne Middleton Doctor, Cynthia Hurd, Susie Jackson, Ethel Lance, Rev. Clementa Pinckney, Tywanza Sanders, Rev. Dr. Daniel Simmons, Sr., Sharonda Coleman-Singleton, and Myra Thompson.

 

Photo: Terri Barr, of Columbia, S.C., stands silently against a fence while visiting a sidewalk memorial in memory of the shooting victims in front of Emanuel AME Church Monday, June 22, 2015, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

 

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Basic Black: The Year of the Gun

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Politics

December 18, 2015

This year has been tragically and persistently the year of the gun. But gun violence is nothing new in communities of color; we’ll take a look at the impact of potential reforms and the resistance to such reforms. The long-awaited Star Wars movie opens on December 18. In the run up to the premiere, controversy swirled around the fact that one of the main characters is black. We’ll take a look at the meaning of characters of color in science fiction.


 


(AP Photo/Princes Georges Police)

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Empowering Women & Girls: Nicole Roberts Jones

Arts & Culture | Black Boston | Health | Politics

by Talia Whyte


Nicole Roberts Jones
was the mistress of ceremonies at Boston's 43rd annual Martin Luther King Day Breakfast.  As the old adage goes, behind every great man is an even greater woman.  Coretta Scott King played a vital role as Dr. King’s wife and organizing partner.  There were many other women who had participated in the civil rights movement, but unlike Mrs. King, Betty Shabazz and Rosa Parks, their accomplishments have been given little attention.

Ella Baker, Septima Poinsette Clark, Fannie Lou Hamer and Vivian Malone Jones are all unsung heroines from that era.  Baker was a longtime organizer for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) who worked behind the scenes.  Because she was neither a man nor a minister, she was not seriously considered to become the head of the organization.  Clark, better known as the “queen mother” of the civil rights movement, was an educator who played a role in a legal victory that would allow blacks to become principals in public schools in Charleston, South Carolina.  Hamer was a Mississippi sharecropper, who was beaten and jailed in 1962 for trying to register to vote.  She co-founded the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and spoke at the 1964 Democratic National Convention.  Jones defied Gov. George Wallace by becoming one of the first black students to enroll at the University of Alabama in 1963.

And there were countless other women, who are unknown, but worked tirelessly cooking meals and cleaning up after rallies.  These women should be the main role models for today’s black women, not stars on reality shows.   

While no woman gave a speech at the 1963 March on Washington, it seems like their accomplishments are now being recognized.  Myrlie Evers-Williams delivered the invocation at President Obama’s inauguration – the first ever done by a woman and layperson.

“There’s a Chinese saying, ’Women hold up half the world,” said former NAACP chairman Julian Bond. “In the case of the civil rights movement it’s probably three-quarters of the world.”

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Showing 1 through 6 of 6 results