Editor's News Pick

Park Ranger Shelton Johnson: Spending Time Outdoors Is About Civil Rights

more
Email
Share
Podcast
Download
Embed

 

Black and Meatless - sort of... (Eating Green - part 3 of 3)

 

 

 

 

 

Black and meatless – sort of...
By Talia Whyte

I visited with sustainability consultant and candidate for the city council at-large seat Scotland Willis recently at his Fort Hill home about all things growing and eating green.  As a senior partner at the consulting firm The Lyceum Group, Willis works on issues related to corporate sustainability and bringing green jobs low-income communities. He also co-chairs the Urban Massachusetts Green Alliance, and founded the Green Constitution Project.  
 
Like Willis, I have also made changes to made changes in my own food habits for both health and environmental reason.  A couple of months ago, I became a "flexitarian" – a vegetarian who eats meat part occasionally.  According to the American Dietetic Association, approximately a quarter of Americans consider themselves flexitarians by eating veggie-friendly meals at least four times a week.  According to the American Dietetic Association, approximately a quarter of Americans consider themselves flexitarians by eating veggie-friendly meals at least four days a week.  In addition, a ground-breaking 2006 United Nations report shows that global meat production contributes to 18 percent of greenhouses gas emissions. 
Since I started on my food regimen, I have felt more physically felt, as well having that good feeling of contributing to a smaller carbon footprint.  I have also started to embrace the Jamaican diet of being “ital” – no red meat, no salt and only fresh foods.  When I do eat meat - humanely-grown chicken, turkey and fish - I make sure to buy it from ethical, local farmers.  My favorite dish is callaloo, a leafy vegetable originating fron the Caribbean, cooked with onions, garlic and tomatoes - all purchased at farmers' markets.