Basic Black Programs 2005-2008

 
All programs premiere Thursdays at 7:30pm on 2.

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Since 1968, Basic Black (formerly Say Brother) has captured the stories, people, and issues that illuminate the African American experience in the Boston area and beyond.

Browse and watch full-length Basic Black programs by topic:
line ARTS & CULTURE
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elizabeth alexander WatchPoet Elizabeth Alexander
Elizabeth Alexander reads from American Sublime, and her latest collection, Miss Crandall's School for Young Ladies and Little Misses of Color. She discusses the importance of language and other artistic expression in the composition of a poem. line
dionne bennett WatchScholar Dionne Bennett: Emotional Racism
Former Harvard University Du Bois Institute Fellow Dionne Bennett explores the emotional effects of racism, both inside black communities and between blacks and whites. line mary frances berry WatchScholar Mary Frances Berry
Mary Frances Berry is the former embattled head of the US Commision on Civil Rights. She discusses her biography of Callie House, an ex-slave who spearheaded the reparations movement. line Dale Andrews and Davarian Baldwin WatchBlack Heroes and Icons
Do we sometimes lose the true meaning of our heroes' messages? Basic Black host Kim McLarin is joined by Dale Andrews from Boston University and Davarian Baldwin from Boston College for a discussion about honoring our black heroes and icons. line Theater directors WatchBlack Theater Roundtable
What is black theater? Three directors immersed in Boston's dramatic arts scene attempt to answer this question. line ronald brownwatchChoreographer Ronald K. Brown
Ronald K. Brown believes that his mission is to tell stories of the human condition through dance. Brown reflects on his life in dance and the formation of his dance company, Evidence. line Brian Coleman WatchAuthor Brian Coleman
In his book Check the Technique: Liner Notes for Hip-Hop Junkies, Brian Coleman recounts the stories behind the creation of hits by Public Enemy, Run-DMC, the Roots, the Fugees, and many more. line june crosswatch icon Journalist and Author June Cross
Journalist, filmmaker, and author June Cross discusses her autobiographical film and memoir, Secret Daughter: A Mixed-Race Daughter and the Mother Who Gave Her Away. line Cora Daniels WatchAuthor Cora Daniels
Cora Daniels discusses how the concept of ghetto has permeated popular culture and how this mind-set affects communities of color. line debra dickersonwatch iconAuthor Debra Dickerson: Breaking the Habits of Race
A former Air Force intelligence officer, Debra Dickerson began her writing career in 1996 and has since been widely published. In her book The End of Blackness, Dickerson urges the black community to move beyond white racism in order to achieve individual and collective progress. line roland fryerwatch iconEconomist Roland Fryer
Economist Roland uses economic research techniques to confront controversial issues of race and discrimination. In this interview, Fryer discusses the results of one of his most provocative studies, "Acting White." line lawrence otis grahamWatchAuthor Lawrence Otis Graham
Best known for going undercover as a busboy at an exclusive Connecticut country club, Lawrence Otis Graham discusses the history of America's black upper class in his biography of Blanche Bruce, the first black elected senator. line Web Exclusive
Watch WWII Veteran James E. Guilford Jr. (10:18)
James E. Guilford Jr. recounts his experience serving in the 29th Quartermaster Regiment, an African American unit of the US Army, in the Pacific theater during World War II. line charlayne hunter-gaultWatchJournalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault
Charlayne Hunter-Gault was the first black woman to attend the University of Georgia, in 1961. She went on to a career in journalism that spans four decades. In her book New News Out Of Africa, Hunter-Gault turns her journalistic eye toward the achievements and challenges of an ever-changing continent. line Phil Haddix & Mariama White-HammondWatchHip-Hop Culture & Social Justice
Can hip-hop culture catalyze a generation toward positive social change? Basic Black explores that question with Mariama White Hammond, director of Project Hip-Hop, based in Roxbury, and Phil Haddix, coordinator of the Career Connection and Summer Program for Just a Start, based in Cambridge, Mass. line major jackson WatchPoet Major Jackson
Major Jackson reads from his book of poetry Hoops and discusses the inspiration behind his work as well as his thoughts on how American history has influenced the work of generations of African American poets. line Bill T. Jones WatchChoreographer Bill T. Jones
Legendary dancer and choreographer Bill T. Jones discusses his life in the arts and the Boston premiere of his work, Chapel/Chapter. line Randall Kennedy WatchAuthor and Professor Randall Kennedy
Randall Kennedy discusses his new book Sellout: The Politics of Racial Betrayal. In this conversation, Kennedy outlines his views on who is black, who speaks for the community, and who can be called a "sell out." line John Mcwhorter WatchAuthor John McWhorter
Author and intellectual John McWhorter asserts his thoughts on how black America can understand and solve its cultural dilemmas and what he thinks it means to be "authentically black." line Tracy Sharpley-Whiting WatchTracy Sharpley-Whiting
Author Tracy Sharpley-Whiting discusses the intersection of feminism, race, and hip-hop and the ramifications of marketing images that denigrate women. line imani winds quintetWatchWoodwind Quintet Imani Winds
Classical chamber music gets an infusion of soul in performances by the African American and Hispanic quintet Imani Winds. line Ahmed Kathrada and Howard Manly WatchActivist Ahmed Kathrada
Ahmed Kathrada served 26 years of a life sentence at the notorious Robben Island prison for his activism against apartheid in South Africa. He later became a cabinet member in President Nelson Mandela's administration. line Michelle Singletary and Howard Manly WatchAuthor Michelle Singletary: Money Matters
Financial adviser Michelle Singletary writes about business and personal finance. Her Washington Post column, "The Color of Money," is syndicated across the country. In this interview, Singletary discusses her book Your Money and Your Man, in which she notes, "Money may not be able to buy you love, but conflicts about it can certainly bankrupt your relationship." line Anna Deveare Smith WatchPlaywright Anna Deavere Smith
Playwright, actress, and professor Anna Deavere Smith discusses her career and latest book, Letters to a Young Artist. line esperanza spaldingWatchMusician Esperanza Spalding
Jazz bassist and vocalist Esperanza Spalding talks about her life in music and performs some of her original compositions. line wole soyinkaWatch Author Wole Soyinka
Nigerian Nobel laureate and activist Wole Soyinka writes to illuminate the human condition and protest social injustice. In this interview, Soyinka talks about his memoir, You Must Set Forth at Dawn. line Carol Maillard and Ysaye Maria Barnwell WatchMusic Group Sweet Honey in the Rock
As warriors of word and music, the Grammy-winning a capella ensemble Sweet Honey in the Rock infuse their sound with African American musical traditions and themes of social justice. Members Carol Maillard and Ysaye Maria Barnwell discuss the power of music to motivate and to heal. line Ngugi wa Thiong'o watchAuthor Ngugi wa Thiong' o
Writer Ngugi wa Thiong'o fled his native Kenya under threats of harassment and imprisonment for speaking against the government. But his writing flourishes even while he is in exile. Thiong'o talks about his novel The Wizard and the Crow. line Patricia Williams WatchScholar Patricia Williams
Patricia Williams is a professor of law at Columbia University. She received a MacArthur "genius" grant in 2000. Williams's writings explore the connections between power, race, and gender; her column, "Diary of a Mad Law Professor," appears regularly in The Nation. line Barbara Lewis and Michael Maso WatchThe Legacy of August Wilson
August Wilson's plays represent a dramatic historical record of the African American experience. When Wilson died in 2005, he was eulogized as one of the greatest American playwrights. Michael Maso, managing director of the Huntington Theater, and Barbara Lewis, director of the Trotter Institute at UMass Boston, explore Wilson's legacy.

line ECONOMICS & POLITICS line

barack obama WatchElection 2008: After the Last Primary
As one of the most closely-watched Democratic primary seasons in memory comes to a close, Basic Black's Kim McLarin and Beat the Press contributor Callie Crossley co-host this LIVE special exploring Barack Obama's historic presidential nomination. line mary frances berryWatch Scholar Mary Frances Berry
Mary Frances Berry is the former embattled head of the US Commision on Civil Rights. She discusses her biography of Callie House, an ex-slave who spearheaded the reparations movement. line WatchBlack Capital: Black Business in Boston
According to data from the US census, the number of black-owned businesses has grown at five times the rate of all corporations in Massachusetts. But if black businesses are booming, why is the future of minority-owned businesses uncertain? line terence samuel WatchThe Black Vote
A discussion on the race to the White House. What are the predicted trends in black voting after Barack Obama's victory in Iowa? And is America ready for a black president? line ronald brown watchChoreographer Ronald K. Brown
Ronald K. Brown believes that his mission is to tell stories of the human condition through dance. Brown reflects on his life in dance and the formation of his dance company, Evidence. line debra dickersonwatch iconAuthor Debra Dickerson: Breaking the Habits of Race
A former Air Force Intelligence officer Debra Dickerson began her writing career in 1996 and has since been widely published. In her book, The End of Blackness, Dickerson lays down the gauntlet to the black community to move beyond white racism in order to achieve individual and collective progress. line blanton, adams-heath, campen, mclarin WatchDiscriminatory Lending
A conversation about racial discrimination in mortgage lending. What should you know before buying your first home? line roland fryerWatchEconomist Roland Fryer
Economist Roland uses economic research techniques to confront controversial issues of race and discrimination. In this interview Fryer discusses the results of one of his most provocative studies, "Acting White." line lawrence otis grahamWatchAuthor Lawrence Otis Graham
Best known for going undercover as a busboy in an exclusive Connecticut country club, Lawrence Otis Graham discusses the long and vibrant history of America's black upperclass in his biography of Blanche Bruce, the first black elected senator. line Phil Haddix & Mariama White-HammondWatchHip Hop Culture & Social Justice
Can hip hop culture catalyze a generation toward positive social change? Basic Black explores that question with Mariama White Hammond, director of Project Hip Hop, based in Roxbury, and Phil Haddix, coordinator of the Career Connection and Summer Program for Just A Start, based in Cambridge, Mass. line ahmed kathrada and howard manlyWatchActivist Ahmed Kathrada
Ahmed Kathrada served twenty-six years of a life sentence on the notorious Robben Island for his activism against apartheid in South Africa. He later became a cabinet member in President Nelson Mandela's administration. line john mcwhorter WatchAuthor John McWhorter
Author and intellectual John McWhorter asserts his thoughts on how black America can understand and solve its cultural dilemmas and what he thinks it means to be "authentically black." line michelle singletary and howard manlyWatchAuthor Michelle Singletary: Money Matters
Financial advisor Michelle Singletary writes about business and personal finance. Her Washington Post column, "The Color of Money" is syndicated across the country. In this interview Singletary discusses her book, Your Money and Your Man, in which she notes, "Money may not be able to buy you love, but conflicts about it can certainly bankrupt your relationship." line wole soyinkaWatch Author Wole Soyinka
Nigerian Nobel laureate and activist Wole Soyinka writes to illuminate the human condition and protest social injustice. In this interview Soyinka talks about his memoir, You Must Set Forth At Dawn. line Ngugi wa Thiong'o watchAuthor Ngugi wa Thiong' o
Writer Ngugi wa Thiong'o fled his native Kenya under threats of harassment and imprisonment for speaking against the government. But his writing flourishes even while he is in exile. Ngugi wa Thiong' o talks about his novel, The Wizard and the Crow. line patricia williamsWatchScholar Patricia Williams
Patricia Williams is a professor of law at Columbia University. She received a MacArthur "Genius" Award in 2000. Williams's writings explore the connections between power, race and gender; her column, "Diary of A Mad Law Professor," appears regularly in The Nation.


line HEALTH line

Gary Daffin and Nancy NormanWatchAIDS: 25 Years in the Black Community
AIDS is becoming a leading cause of death for African Americans. According to the Centers For Disease Control & Prevention, African Americans, who are only 13 percent of the population, accounted for almost half of the AIDS cases diagnosed in 2004. Boston-area health professionals discuss the causes of, and possible remedies for, this public health crisis. line judyann bigby WatchHealth Check-Up with Mass. Secretary of Health
The state Department of Public Health recently released a report covering a broad spectrum of health issues. In this episode Dr. JudyAnn Bigby, Secretary of the Executive Office of Health and Human Services discusses her department's findings. line dionne bennett WatchScholar Dionne Bennett: Emotional Racism
Social interactions between Blacks and whites are often plagued not only by the American history of slavery, but also by stereotyping and how we think and feel about one another even now, in the twenty-first century. Former Harvard University Du Bois Institute Fellow Dionne Bennett explores the emotional effects of racism both inside black communities and between blacks and whites. line David Bositis and Wilbur Rich WatchSuper Tuesday and the Black Vote
Wilbur Rich, professor of political science at Wellesley College, and David Bositis, political analyst for the Joint Center for Poltical and Economic Studies in Washington, D.C., analyze the results from Super Tuesday. line John Mugane, Karimi Gituma, Paul Waithaka WatchKenya: Working Towards Peace
Kenya erupted in violence and chaos after its presidential election in late December 2007. Three members of Boston's Kenyan community discuss the reasons and possible remedies for the African nation's violent backlash. line Geoff Ward WatchYoung Black Justice
Geoff Ward, an assistant professor at the Institute on Race & Justice at Northeastern University, weighs in on the historical foundation of the juvenile justice system and how, over the last few decades, it was transformed from a method of rehabilitation to a system of punishment, especially of black youth. line Rosa Smith WatchYoung, Black, Male, and at Risk
Black boys are more likely than any other group of children to be expelled or suspended from school. They are more often assigned to special education classes and frequently classified as mentally retarded. Rosa Smith, former President of the Schott Foundation for Public Education, provides insight into the causes and solutions for this alarming trend. line Deborah Prothrow-Stith WatchDeborah Prothrow-Stith: Youth Violence
Dr. Deborah Prothrow-Stith believes that youth violence should be treated as a public health issue. She is the co-author of Murder Is No Accident.



line TECHNOLOGY & EDUCATION line

WatchBlack Communities and New Technologies
How are African Americans engaging in new technologies? Guests include Linda Grisham (shown), associate professor and director of the Science in Education program at Lesley University; Patricia Hill Collins, professor of sociology at the University of Maryland; and Hiawatha Bray, technology reporter for the Boston Globe. line Paul Reville WatchEye on Education 2008
In this Eye on Education episode of Basic Black, host Kim McLarin speaks with Paul Reville the state's newly appointed Secretary of Education. Reville discusses the state's Readiness Project, the achievement gap, and preparing Massachusetts' students to compete in the global arena. line Phil Haddix & Mariama White-HammondWatchHip Hop Culture & Social Justice
Can hip hop culture catalyze a generation toward positive social change? Basic Black explores that question with Mariama White Hammond, director of Project Hip Hop, based in Roxbury, and Phil Haddix, coordinator of the Career Connection and Summer Program for Just A Start, based in Cambridge, Mass. line basic black guestsWatchTools of Engagement
On this episode of Basic Black, guest host Howard Manly talks with educators about the usefulness of rewards and how educators can best engage black students in the learning process. line J. Keith Motley WatchKeith Motley: The Urban University
Dr. Keith Motley explains why he thinks urban universities, such as UMass Boston where he worked , have a responsibility to the larger surrounding community. line deborah prothrow-stithWatchDeborah Prothrow-Stith: Youth Violence
Dr. Deborah Prothrow-Stith believes that youth violence should be treated as a public health issue. She is the co-author of Murder Is No Accident. line stephanie wilsonWatchAstronaut Stephanie Wilson
After 13 days and 5 million miles, Astronaut Stephanie Wilson made history in July 2006 when she became the second African American woman to go on a space mission. Wilson, a Massachusetts native, discusses her life in science and the importance of space exploration. line Rosa Smith WatchYoung, Black, Male, and at Risk
Black boys are more likely than any other group of children to be expelled or suspended from school. They are more often assigned to special education classes and frequently classified as mentally retarded. Rosa Smith, former President of the Schott Foundation for Public Education, provides insight into the causes and solutions for this alarming trend. line
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