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YOUR HEALTH
Can you fight fat with a spoonful of these?

Black Pepper May Give You A Kick, But Don't Count On It For Weight Loss

Black pepper and other spicy foods are often touted as weight loss aides, thanks to ingredients like capsaicin, but saying no to the freshly-grated Parmesan is more likely to help you lose weight.
YOUR HEALTH
Researchers say our brains are probably wired from an evolutionary sense to encourage running and high aerobic activities. Above, a man runs past the Sydney Harbour Bridge on April 22.

'Wired To Run': Runner's High May Have Been Evolutionary Advantage

Endurance athletes sometimes say they're "addicted" to exercise, and research suggests that may not be an overstatement. "Our brains have been sort of rewired from an evolutionary sense to encourage these running and high aerobic activity behaviors," one researcher says.
 

'Life, Interrupted' By Cancer Diagnosis At 22

Months after moving to Paris to start her first full-time job, Suleika Jaouad was diagnosed with leukemia. Now, she is coping with relying on her parents for care while dealing with adult issues of mortality, infertility and disease. She writes about her experience for the New York Times Well blog.

'Life, Interrupted' By Cancer Diagnosis At 22

Months after moving to Paris to start her first full-time job, Suleika Jaouad was diagnosed with leukemia. Now, she is coping with relying on her parents for care while dealing with adult issues of mortality, infertility and disease. She writes about her experience for the New York Times Well blog.

Buyers Of Hyped Skechers 'Toning Shoes' Can Get Refunds

Skechers has agreed to pay $40 million to settle claims that it deceived buyers of Shape-ups shoes.

Breasts: Bigger And More Vulnerable To Toxins

Science writer Florence Williams' new book examines how breasts are changing.

FDA Delays Sunscreen Label Redo

To avert summer shortages, the agency has delayed changes to sunscreen labels.

Poll: Americans Support Compensation For Organ Donors

About 60 percent of Americans support health care credits as compensation for organ donors.

Also in Your Health

You May Be Among The Things That Go Bump In The Night

Some 3.6 percent of adults engaged in "nocturnal wandering," as the researchers put it, in the year before they answered questions during an interview for a study. One percent reported having two or more episodes of sleepwalking a month. - READ MORE

Cost Of Cancer Pills Can Be Hard For Medicare Patients To Swallow

How some insurers pay for treatments means that cancer pills can wind up costing a patient more than an IV. Some states have passed laws to make sure that patients don't have to pay more to take pills. But those laws don't apply to Medicare. - READ MORE

Jetlagged By Your Social Calendar? Better Check Your Waistline

The disconnect between our social calendars and our biological clocks is creating 'social jet lag,' according to a key researchers. And that's taking a toll on our weight because the body stores fat when it's not getting enough sleep. - READ MORE

Pounding Away At America's Obesity Epidemic

One third of Americans today are obese, and another third are overweight. Nearly one-third of our children are obese. The dramatic growth of obesity in the U.S is the subject of a new HBO documentary series called The Weight of the Nation. - READ MORE

Wearing Helmets In Tornadoes Gains Momentum

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says there's not yet enough scientific evidence to fully endorse the idea, but the agency is warming up to people donning helmets when severe weather threatens. - READ MORE

Use Of Tanning Beds Common, Despite Cancer Risks

But the most likely adult users, as you might have guessed, are women between 18 and 25. Around 30 percent of white women in that age group had used an indoor tanning machine of some sort in 2010. - READ MORE

Feds Join Fight Against Whooping Cough In Washington

About 1 in 5 infants who get whooping cough will get pneumonia, and in some cases die. In Washington state, where confirmed cases are 10 times as high as they were last year, officials hope federal investigators will help them trace the source of the current outbreak. - READ MORE

What Our Gut Microbes Say About Us

While U.S. adults have relatively uniform microbe colonies in their guts, adults in Malawi and Amazonia have much more diverse populations. Scientists are still struggling with why that is and what it means. - READ MORE

Stand Up, Walk Around, Even Just For '20 Minutes'

New York Times "Phys Ed" columnist Gretchen Reynolds has some simple advice for staying healthy: Stand up. Move around. In her new book, The First 20 Minutes, she explains the hazards a sedentary lifestyle, and details some of the surprisingly simple ways to stay fit. - READ MORE

Shopping Bags Can Also Carry Stomach Flu Virus

Norovirus particles can fly through the air, land on things like plastic bags and survive there for weeks, according to an investigation of a stomach flu outbreak in Oregon. The researchers say this proves you don't have to have direct contact with someone to get sick. - READ MORE