John Talabot: From Sleek Grooves, A Fluid Sound
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Anthony Fantano
Monday, May 14, 2012 at 7:03 AM
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"Destiny" presents an aesthetic that would work well in heavy rotation at the world's most extravagant fashion shows: The tempo ought to fall perfectly in sync with the bolt strut of a highly paid runway model.

   
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Grooves are important to John Talabot — they're pivotal. That's the case with most dance-music producers, but there's something especially sleek about the Spanish producer's debut album, ƒIN.

"Destiny" presents an aesthetic that would work well in heavy rotation at the world's most extravagant fashion shows: The tempo ought to fall perfectly in sync with the bolt strut of a highly paid runway model. It could just be subconscious catering to the world of couture, but nothing about the music Talbot produces seems likely to go out of style.

The vocal contributions from fellow Spaniard Pional shine confidently through the reverb as Talabot's beats sidestep overtly electronic textures, focusing instead on a wide array of timbres that carry more natural tones. The rhythm here is built on subtle clicks, acoustic drums, warm bass and atmospheric synths with a sharp, metallic quality to them. With its rich textures, "Destiny" sounds more performed than produced. Like contemporaries such as Caribou or Nicolas Jaar, Talabot makes meticulous and detailed tracks feel fluid. [Copyright 2012 National Public Radio]



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