Google Glasses: Frightening Or Fantastic?
News > News
Mark Memmott
Thursday, February 23, 2012 at 10:05 AM
Font size: A | A | A | A |

The buzz is building about the news that there soon may be "Google glasses" that can put information right in front of your eyes. But is that necessarily a good thing?

The buzz is building about the news that, as The New York Times has reported, there soon may be "Google glasses" that can "stream information to the wearer's eyeballs in real time."

Yes, by the end of the year Google may be selling spectacles that come with a small screen that in theory will allow users to get information about nearby locations, the weather, friends who might be close by and other things. They're reportedly going to cost between $250 and $600.

Sounds cool, right?

Well, PCWorld's Damon Brown calls the glasses a "prescription for disaster." He's worried about how what might happen if someone tries to drive while wearing them, and about how much more information they'll be transmitting to Google about where you are, what you do and what you see.

The Atlantic's Rebecca J. Rosen raises the issue of how those of us who aren't wearing such glasses will be able to rest easy that we're not being recorded by those who are.

Still, since so many of us carry around devices that already let us connect to the Web from almost anywhere, is having something that brings the information right to your eyes that much different?

Or, is it just one more step toward a Terminator-type world?

Here's a question:

(Note: As we say, that's a question. It's not a scientific survey of public opinion.) [Copyright 2012 National Public Radio]



This article is filed in: News, Digital Life, Technology, Home Page Top Stories

Also in News  
Thank The Patron Saint Of Bakers For This Cake Today
The French honor the patron saint of baking with cream-filled cake topped with caramelized sugar.

Bloomberg: Facebook's Saverin May Save $67 Million By Renouncing Citizenship
News that Eduardo Saverin renounced his U.S. citizenship ignited controversy about tax dodging.

Town's Effort To Link Fracking And Illness Falls Short
Despite residents' fears, scientists say they can't link health woes to gas wells in Dish, Texas.

Chipping In To Your Office Lottery Pool? Read This First
A dispute in Chicago over $118 million underscores why it's important to write things down.

Latino Voters: Seen, But Will They Be Heard, In 2012?
Now the fastest growing voting group, Latinos could play a key role in battleground states.

Comments  
Post a Comment