Massive Solar Storm Causes Planes To Be Rerouted
News > Space
Eyder Peralta
Tuesday, January 24, 2012 at 3:47 PM
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Delta rerouted at least six planes to avoid the potentially dangerous solar storm. The planes avoided the North Pole and took a more southern route.

   
This January 23, 2012 image provided by NASA, captured by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, shows an M9-class solar flare erupting on the Sun's northeastern hemisphere.
This January 23, 2012 image provided by NASA, captured by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, shows an M9-class solar flare erupting on the Sun's northeastern hemisphere.
AFP/Getty Images

You might have heard about a major solar storm that is hitting Earth right now. It's the biggest to hit us since 2005. You've also probably heard a few pople say, "I didn't feel anything."

As our friends at 13.7 explained earlier today, the storms have the ability to disrupt sensitive electronics and even the power grid. Usually none of those things happen. But, today's solar storm did cause a bit of disruption.

As Fox Business reports, Delta Air Lines rerouted at least six planes that were supposed to cross the North Pole. Fox explains:

"There is no risk to people on Earth, Doug Biesecker of the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center told FoxNews.com.

"But as a rare precaution, some polar flights were re-routed to avoid communication lapses and exposing pilots and passengers to excessive radiation.

"'We know that some airlines did not fly the polar routes yesterday,' Biesecker told FoxNews.com. Delta is one of them, rerouting flights between Hong Kong and the U.S. that usually fly over the pole."

Besides the rerouting, the solar storm also produced some spectacular northern lights. MSNBC's Photoblog has some images of the auroras. [Copyright 2012 National Public Radio]



This article is filed in: Space, News, Science

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