In Haiti, Where Does Art Fit In?
News > Fine Art
NPR Staff
Thursday, January 12, 2012 at 10:00 AM
Font size: A | A | A | A |

A painting by a Haitian artist is on display in Washington, D.C.
A painting by a Haitian artist is on display in Washington, D.C.
Doriane Raiman | NPR

With tens of thousands of Haitians still displaced and living in tent cities, some might consider art a luxury few can afford.

There's no doubt that art can help us cope with troubled times. It's a way to process the inexplicable, express the unutterable.

But with tens of thousands of Haitians still displaced and living in tent cities, some might consider art a luxury few can afford. Diane Ford Dessables, though, founder of Ayitian Arts Project, says that in addition to the obvious emotional benefits, there are real economic reasons for supporting Haiti's arts.

"What we're doing here is focusing on art and using art as a means of spurring community development," she tells NPR's Michel Martin.

She's the person behind 3 Pent Ayisyen (Three Haitian Painters), a small exhibition at a Washington, D.C., restaurant that focuses on the works of artists who live and work around the Haitian capital of Port-au-Prince.

"We're actually trying to increase the income artists receive — and that residual income permeates throughout the Haitian economy," Dessables says.

While small in scope, the aim behind the exhibit is to generate enough funds through the sale of paintings to repair an arts school in Jacmel that was left damaged by the earthquake that devastated the country two years ago.

The exhibition features works by artists Augustin Mona, Michelet "Najee" Calice and Henry Robert Derazin. It will be on display at Washington's Busboys and Poets restaurant through Feb. 17. [Copyright 2012 National Public Radio]



This article is filed in: Fine Art, Arts & Living, World News, Home Page Top Stories

Also in Fine Art  
Even Under Threat, Syrian Artists Paint In Protest
A Beirut gallery recently featured art smuggled out of Syria, much of it inspired by the uprisings.

Art In A Neon Cage: Welcome To The Havana Biennial
Havana's hulking La Cabana fortress is home to one of Latin America's most important art events.

The Serious Comic Art Of Daniel Clowes
Comics enter the world of fine art with a new exhibition featuring the work of Daniel Clowes.

Keith Haring: A Return To His Radiant Roots
A new exhibition in Brooklyn showcases some of his rare early drawings.

I Shall 'Scream' At Such A Price Tag
One of four versions Edvard Munch made of his masterpiece, The Scream, one of the most recognizable works of art in the world, was auctioned at Sotheby's this week for a record-setting price: $119 million.

Comments  
Post a Comment