Condoleezza Rice Resents Cheney's 'Attack On My Integrity'
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Mark Memmott
Thursday, September 1, 2011 at 9:00 AM
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She also disputes his account of her crying during one meeting. "I don't remember coming to the vice president tearfully about anything in the entire eight years that I knew him," Rice tells Reuters.

Top officials from President George W. Bush's administration continue to fire back at former Vice President Dick Cheney for things he says in his new memoir.

First it was former Secretary of State Colin Powell who accused Cheney of taking "cheap shots" with some of his criticisms of former colleagues.

Then Powell's former chief of staff, Col. Lawrence Wilkerson, said Cheney "fears being tried as a war criminal" and is seeking "vindication" for his views on the war with Iraq and other issues.

Now Bush's other secretary of state, Condoleezza Rice, has told Reuters that "I don't appreciate the attack on my integrity" that she feels Cheney makes in the book. Reuters says that:

"Rice rejected Cheney's contention that she misled President George W. Bush about nuclear diplomacy with North Korea. 'I kept the president fully and completely informed about every in and out of the negotiations with the North Koreans,' " she said.

She also disputed Cheney's account of her crying as she conceded he had been right to say the administration shouldn't have apologize for claims it made about Iraq's supposed nuclear weapons program.

"It certainly doesn't sound like me, now, does it?" Rice told Reuters. "I would never — I don't remember coming to the vice president tearfully about anything in the entire eight years that I knew him."

Cheney, as we've reported, says he tells things as he remembers them having happened. [Copyright 2011 National Public Radio]



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