Foodie Blog

Asian Pistou Dumplings in Lime Broth By Ming Tsai

Friday, August 6, 2010
0 Comments   0 comments.

daily dish banner



Some of China’s smallest treasures are also its tastiest — dim sum — those savory little dumplings filled with meat, seafood, and vegetables. And they translate well to Western cuisine because they make great hors d’oeuvres. Today, however, we serve up a vegetarian soup version in my Asian Pistou Dumplings in Lime Broth. Let’s get cooking.

Yield: 10 dumplings

Ingredients
1 bunch scallions, sliced thinly, white and green separated
4 cups vegetarian broth
Juice of 2 limes
1 tablespoon Wanjashan low-sodium tamari
1/2 cup packed parsley
1/2 cup packed Thai basil
4 cloves garlic
1/2 cup edamame
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
10-12 thin wonton wrappers
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions
In a saucepot coated lightly with extra virgin olive oil, sweat the scallion whites and add broth. Reduce by 25%. Season and add lime juice and tamari. Meanwhile, using mortar and pestle, blend with a pinch of salt the parsley, basil, and garlic.

Fold in edamame and extra virgin olive oil and check for seasoning. Alternatively, using a food processor, pulse together salt, parsley, basil and garlic. Remove mixture to a bowl and fold in edamame and whisk in olive oil.

Make wontons with Asian pistou filling. Boil in broth and serve.

Garnish with scallions greens.

__________________________________________________________
Chef Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the country."

Soba Noodle-Shrimp Pancakes By Ming Tsai

Monday, August 9, 2010
0 Comments   0 comments.

daily dish banner



You may think that pasta is only as flavorful as its sauce, but that would mean you haven’t tried Japanese soba noodles. Made of buckwheat, they have an earthy, nutty flavor that evokes the countryside, which is why I’ve paired them with an Italian ingredient that has the same effect, pancetta. And this east-west pair is going to be the platform for today’s all in one dish: my Soba Noodle Shrimp Pancakes.

Serves 4

Ingredients
2 eggs
1 pound shrimp
1/4 cup chopped parsley, plus some leaves for garnish
2 tablespoons yuzu or fresh lemon juice
1 cup diced, rendered pancetta, cooled
2 cups blanched soba noodles (leave a pinhole of rawness in center)
Chopped parsley, for garnish (optional)
Canola oil for frying
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions
In a food processor fitted with blade, add the eggs and shrimp and pulse until chopped into a chunky mousse. Season with salt and pepper. Have soba noodles in a large bowl and pour mousse over noodles. Fold in parsley, yuzu and pancetta. Check flavor by cooking a small portion and season if necessary. Spread noodle pancake mixture in an even layer in a sauté pan over high heat coated with oil. Shallow fry pancakes until golden, brown and delicious, both sides, about 6 minutes. Cut into wedges and garnish with parsley.

Drink pairings
Sapporo Beer
—From Japan

A lager, quite refreshing with a moderately light body. Pairs very nicely with the Soba Noodle-Shrimp Pancakes.

Jean Luc Colombo Rose
—Provence, France
Taste: Surprisingly complex, with intriguing notes of raspberry, cherry and black olive
Aroma: Subtle hints of peach, rose petals and pepper on the nose

Colombo is hailed as “the winemaking wizard of the Rhone” for introducing innovative methods in his vineyards and throughout the production process while making well-regarded, original wines. He believes good wine relies on 3 key elements: terroir, human endeavor and modern winemaking techniques.

—Enjoy on its own or with a wide range of appetizers, fish, poultry dishes and vegetarian fare. This wines pairs equally well with Michel Richard’s Beet Soba Bolognese and Ming’s Soba Noodle Carbonara.

—40% Syrah, 40% Mourvedre, 20% Counoise

__________________________________________________________
Chef Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the nation.

Black Lychee Tea Granita
By Ming Tsai

Wednesday, October 13, 2010
0 Comments   0 comments.

daily dish banner

Black Lychee Tea Granita

Here's a great dessert that comes to us from Sicily by way of Asia. It's a homeade sorbet-like dessert without the usual frozen dessert hassle.

Ingredients
2 3/4 cups water
1/4 cup black lychee tea
3/4 packed dark brown sugar
2 tablespoons lemon juice
Kosher salt, to taste (optional)

Directions
In a large saucepan, bring 2 cups water to a boil. Turn off heat and pour in tea. Let steep for 1 hour and strain well (using cheesecloth or a fine mesh strainer).

Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, combine brown sugar and 3/4 cup water, stir to dissolve and bring to a boil. Combine the strained tea with 1 cup brown sugar mixture, add lemon juice, a pinch of salt (if using), and stir to combine.

Pour into a freezer-safe baking dish and freeze overnight, stirring 2 or 3 times to achieve a lighter consistency.

To serve, scrape frozen tea mixture with the back of a fork, spoon into dishes, and enjoy. ________________________________________________________________

ming tsai thumbnail holding limeChef Ming Tsai is a local restaurateur and host of Simply Ming.

Chicken Scarpariello
By Lidia Bastianich

Monday, August 9, 2010
0 Comments   0 comments.

daily dish banner



Makes 6 servings

Ingredients
2 small broiler chickens (about 2 ½ pounds each and preferably free-range)
Freshly ground pepper
¼ cup olive oil
½ pound sweet Italian sausage (preferably without fennel seeds) cut into 1-inch pieces
10 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped fine
4 pickled cherry peppers, cut in half and stemmed
¼ cup red wine vinegar
½ cup dry white wine
1 cup chicken stock or canned reduced-sodium chicken broth
¼ cup chopped fresh Italian parsley
Salt

Directions
Cut each chicken into 12 pieces. Wash and pat the chicken pieces dry, then season them generously with salt and pepper. Preheat oven to 475F.

Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a large skillet. Add as many pieces of chicken, skin side down and starting with the leg, thigh and wing pieces, to the skillet as fit without touching. Cook the chicken, turning as necessary, until golden brown on all sides, about 8 minutes.

Remove the chicken pieces as they brown and drain them briefly on paper towels. Place the drained chicken pieces in a roasting pan large enough to hold all of them in a single layer. Repeat with the remaining chicken, adding more oil to the pan as necessary and adjusting the heat to prevent the bits that stick to the pan from overbrowning. As room becomes available in the skillet after all the chicken has been added, tuck in pieces of sausage and cook, turning until browned on all sides.

Remove all chicken and sausage from the pan, add the garlic and cook until golden, being careful not to burn it. Scatter the cherry peppers into the skillet, season with salt and pepper and stir for a minute. Pour in the vinegar and bring to boil, scraping the browned bits that stick to the skillet into the liquid and cook until the vinegar is reduced by half. Add the white wine, bring to a boil and boil until reduced by half, about 3 minutes.

Pour in the stock and bring to a boil. Pour the sauce over the chicken in the roasting pan and stir to coat. Place the chicken in the oven and roast, stirring occasionally, until the sauce is thick and sticky, like molasses, about 10 minutes. If the sauce is still too thin, place the roasting pan directly over medium-high heat on the stovetop and cook, stirring, until it is reduced, about a minute or two. Once the sauce is thickened, toss in parsley and serve.
___________________________________________________________
Lidia Matticchio Bastianich was born in Pola, Istria, on the northeastern coast of the Adriatic Sea. She is a cookbook author, restaurateur, and TV chef extraordinaire. Watch Lidia’s Italy Saturdays at 1:30pm on WGBH 2 or Sundays at 4pm on WGBX 44.

Examining The Science Of Taste

Friday, February 11, 2011
0 Comments   0 comments.

Zesty Applesauce
By Lidia Bastianich

Thursday, October 7, 2010
0 Comments   0 comments.

daily dish banner

apples

Everyone loves a good applesauce. So why don't you try the zesty version straight from Northern Italy? I know that once you have tasted this dish, a recipe found in my cookbook, Lidia Cooks from the Heart of Italy, you will never go back to the plain applesauce.

Directions
Set the applesauce in a pan. Make your own or pick some up at the store.

Add a squeeze of fresh lemon juice, some freshly grated horseradish…and yes horseradish root is available at most grocery stores. It resembles a carrot and like a carrot you can peel it and shred it.

Let the apple, lemon and shredded horseradish cook together.

Once it is perking add ½ a cup of heavy cream.

Stir well to allow all of the flavors to combine.

Serve this delightfully tangy applesauce warm along side a luscious ham, turkey, chicken or roast beef.
___________________________________________________________
lidia bastianichLidia Matticchio Bastianich was born in Pola, Istria, on the northeastern coast of the Adriatic Sea. She is a cookbook author, restaurateur, and TV chef extraordinaire. Watch Lidia's Italy Saturdays at 1:30pm on WGBH 2 or Sundays at 4pm on WGBX 44.

About the Author

RSS   RSS

Food & Wine Festival 2014 Adlob-all pages


Vehicle donation (June 2012) 89.7

Topics

 
You are on page 4 of 41   |