Foodie Blog

Scallion Pancakes with Dipping Sauce
By Ming Tsai

Tuesday, August 10, 2010
4 Comments   4 comments.

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Makes 4 pancakes

Pot stickers, scallion cakes, dim sum… they all have one thing in common, the simplest dough in the universe: hot water dough. Add the great French ingredient, shallots, and you’ve got a combination that can morph into anything.

Hot Water Dough Ingredients
2 cups (16 ounces) all-purpose flour
8 ounces hot water

Directions
In a standing mixer fitted with a dough hook, gradually add water to flour. Once dough forms a ball and all the dry ingredients are incorporated, remove from mixer. Dough should not be sticky. If it is, add more flour, tablespoon by tablespoon. Very lightly flour a flat surface and bring dough together into a disk. Wrap tightly with plastic wrap and chill in fridge for up to 48 hours.

Scallion Pancake Ingredients
1 tablespoon sambal
1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
1/4 cup naturally brewed soy sauce
1 tablespoon Asian sesame oil
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 pound Hot Water Dough
2 cups scallions, white and green parts, cut diagonally, 1/16 inches thick
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 tablespoon grapeseed or canola oil

Directions
1. To make the dipping sauce, combine the sambal, vinegar, and soy sauce in a small bowl and mix. Set aside.

2. In a small bowl combine the sesame and olive oils and set aside.

3. Flour a work surface and on it roll the dough into a rectangle 1/8 inch thick. Brush the dough with the oil mixture, sprinkle with the scallions, and season with salt and pepper.

4. Starting with one long side nearest you, roll the dough jelly-roll fashion to make a tight log. Cut the log into 4 equal pieces.

5. Roll 1 piece with your palms to make a skinnier log about 12 inches in diameter. Twist each end of the log in opposite directions 4 or 5 times (this will make additional pancake layers), then wrap the log around itself to make a coil, tucking the outside end beneath the coil. With a rolling pin, flatten the coil to 1/4 inch thick. Repeat with the remaining dough to make 3 more pancakes.

6. Heat a large nonstick sauté pan over medium heat. Add the grapeseed oil and swirl to coat the pan. Depending on the pan’s size, add 1 to 2 pancakes and cook until brown and crispy on both sides, turning once, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Cook the remaining pancakes. Slice each pancake into 4 wedges.

Variation
For a savory pancake addition, mix 2 cups of finely chopped raw shrimp in a bowl with the scallions. Sprinkle the dough evenly with the mixture, and proceed with the recipe, frying the pancakes 3 to 4 minutes per side.

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ming tsai thumbnail holding limeChef Ming Tsai is a local restaurateur and host of Simply Ming.

Seared Haddock with Beans and Greens
By Annie Copps

Tuesday, August 10, 2010
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Not sure what to have for dinner tonight? I have a quick, easy, healthy and inexpensive meal that will put dinner on the table in 30 minutes. The main ingredients – local white fish and fresh field greens.

Serves 4

Ingredients
½ cup olive oil
3 cloves garlic
1 pound fresh, local white fish (cod, haddock, or whatever is on sale)
1 can of cannellini or garbanzo beans
4 cups of fresh field greens (spring mix, baby romaine, arugula)
Juice from ½ lemon
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions
Saute 2 cloves of very thinly sliced garlic in olive oil (about ½ cup—it’s a lot, but you can use the oil after for other things). Start with cold oil in the pan (it tends to burn if you start with hot oil) and let the garlic cook until just lightly golden brown — about 3 minutes, but keep your eye on it (dark brown or burned means bitter).

Drain the garlic onto paper towels. Pour all but 1 tablespoon of the oil into a bowl and set aside.

Cut the fish into portions, season with salt and pepper, and brown on both sides. Just put it in the pan and don’t move it for 2 minutes; then turn it and cook until it’s cooked through (depends on the fish and the thickness, but 3 minutes oughta do it).

Rinse well and drain 1 can of white beans (I used garbanzo, but cannellini or gigante are great for this, too). In a medium bowl, combine four cups of spring mix or baby romaine with beans, toasted garlic, the juice of half a lemon, and about 1 tablespoon of the cooled garlic oil. Season with salt and pepper. Divide onto four plates and place the fish on top.



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Annie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine’s food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

Deviled Eggs with Tuna and Black Olives
By Annie Copps

Friday, August 6, 2010
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Do you know Oleana  restaurant in Cambridge? Or Sofra in Watertown? My good friend Ana Sortun is the genius behind those excellent restaurants, and in her book Spice, she shares some of her secrets. One of my addictions are her Deviled Eggs with Tuna and Black Olives. I encourage you to serve these at your next party, be it a luncheon, a barbecue, or a fancy dinner. That is assuming you don’t eat them before your guests arrive.

Prep time: 20 mins
Cook: 10 mins
Ready in: 30 mins

Ingredients
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
1 cup minced fresh tuna (about 6 ounces)
1 scallion, minced
1/2 cup minced celery
Tiny pinch curry
Salt and pepper
8 hard-boiled eggs, split in half lengthwise, with yolks and whites separated
1 cup thick mayonnaise, preferably homemade
1 tablespoon chopped parsley
8 black olives, pitted and finely chopped
1 plum tomato, finely chopped

Directions
Heat oil in a medium saucepan over high heat.

Add the tuna, scallion, celery, curry and salt and pepper.

Cook until the tuna is just opaque, about 3 minutes. Cool and drain well.

In a small mixing bowl, mash the egg yolks with a fork. Stir in the mayonnaise, tuna, and
parsley. Season with salt and pepper.

Season the egg whites with salt and pepper and fill their centers with heaping spoonfuls of the tuna egg filling. Top each with a black olive and tomato.

(From Ana Sortum, Spice)


___________________________________________________________
annie coppsAnnie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine's food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

Corn and Tomato Tart
By Annie Copps

Friday, August 6, 2010
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I watch the fields grow all summer long, waiting for the first opportunity to get my hands on a couple ears of fresh corn. And what goes better with corn than its farm field cousin, tomatoes? One of the best places to get corn has to be Verrill Farm in Concord, MA and this corn and tomato tart recipe is their idea.

Total time: 60 minutes; active time: 30 minutes

Yield: 8 to 12 servings

Filling ingredients
3 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 cup chopped onion
1 clove garlic, chopped
5 ears corn, kernels cut off
kosher or sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
1/4 cup grated cheddar cheese
½ pint cherry tomatoes, cut in half
3 scallions, chopped
2 large eggs
1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup heavy cream
Baked pie crust (see recipe below)

Directions
Heat oven to 375°

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, sauté onions and garlic in olive oil until onions are translucent, 3 to 5 minutes. Add corn and cook about 8 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Put half of corn mixture in pre-baked pie crust. Layer cheese evenly on top. Add remaining corn mixture. Scatter cherry tomatoes and scallions on top.

In a small bowl, whisk eggs, milk, and cream; pour egg mixture over tart.

Bake 30 minutes until tart is golden brown.

Piecrust recipe
This recipe is for a 9-by-10-inch pie pan (a tart pan may also be used)

Ingredients
3/4 cups flour
6 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons cold water

Directions
Heat oven to 375 degrees.

In a food processor, pulse together flour, butter, and salt until mixture resembles corn kernels.

Add water and pulse just until the mixture forms a ball. Roll out dough and place in pie pan. Cover with parchment paper and a handful of dried beans or pie weights.

Bake 15 minutes. Let crust cool and add filling.

___________________________________________________________
Annie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine's food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

Miso-Parsley Poached Sole by Ming Tsai

Monday, August 2, 2010
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Miso-Parsley Poached Sole

As many cooks know, dashi is the fundamental Japanese stock. Easily made from a few simple ingredients, it's the basis of miso soup and an integral part of dishes including sukiyaki and shabu shabu. It is a very versatile ingredient and one that Western cooks really ought to use... and today we will use it in my Miso Parsley Poached Sole.

Serves 4

Ingredients
4 cups dashi, heating in pan
2 tablespoons shiro miso
2 bunches flat leaf parsley, picked, save 1 tablespoon freshly chopped leaves
3 tablespoons butter
4 sole fillets, Dover or grey, deboned by cutting a "v" in center of fillet
1 tablespoon yuzu juice
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Ingredients
In a low, wide saucepot, combine dashi and heat over medium-high. Whisk in miso using a strainer and discard granules left in strainer. Add the parsley and butter. Transfer mixture to a heat-proof pitcher and buzz with a handblender. Check seasoning. Add back to saucepot, bring to a simmer and add fish. Cover and turn heat off. Let sit for 5 minutes. Serve in soup plates, garnished with poaching broth and fresh chopped parsley mixed with yuzu juice.

Wine pairing:
Pride of the Village Sake
Junmai Ginjo. An elegant, super-premium sake from a brewery with an 850-year history. The brewery is considered to be Japan's oldest surviving sake brewer.

Taste: A refined and clear flavor, yet settled and deep. Semi-dry with a superbly clean finish -- A fantastic pairing with the Miso-Parsley Poached Sole.

Aroma: A pleasingly light and fruity nose, laced wth violets, strawberries, pear and grape.

Best Of Nantucket 2011

By Cathy Huyghe   |   Thursday, June 2, 2011
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We've said it before and we'll say it again. The Nantucket Wine Festival is THE place to kick off the summer season of wine. Now that it's come and gone, we can put on our hindsight-is-20-20 sunglasses and review the Festival's best highlights. Last weekend's highlights, fortunately, will be there all summer long. Consider this your hit list for the island.

meatloaf sandwich
The meatloaf sandwich pictured here can be had at American Seasons on Nantucket

KIDS MENU AT AMERICAN SEASONS. This secret is so hidden that it literally doesn't exist. American Seasons restaurant, with arguably the best chef on an island of very, very good chefs, does not have a kids' menu. But take some kids in there, and they will not be "cooked down to." No chicken fingers with French fries here. The kitchen will prepare anything from their menu in a plain-ish, kid-friendly style — Wild King salmon, say, but cooked all the way through and minimally seasoned — that wind up being so pure that they may just make the adults at the table jealous.

Website:
http://www.americanseasons.com/

FRANZ HILL VINEYARD WINE AT CURRENTVINTAGE. Price inflation is the immediate effect for most wines that receive a 90+ rating from uber-critic Robert Parker. Except if your wine is Zinfandel from Franz Hill Vineyard in Napa— despite a stellar score of 93 from Parker for their 2005 vintage, this Zin stays at a very earth-bound price of $30 a bottle. Production is extremely, extremely limited but currentVintage on Easy Street has a direct line to the producer. Find it there. Show it off. Whether you tell your guests what a bargain it is is completely up to you.

Websites:
http://www.currentvintage.com/
http://www.franzhillvineyard.com/index.html

BEST NANTUCKET STORY. The tagline for Donelan wines is "Wine is a Journey Not a Destination." For founder Joe Donelan, that journey's gone from college at Holy Cross in Worcester to supplying paper for LL Bean catalogs in Maine to trailing one of Nantucket's greatest sommeliers around the world. Donelan is old-school (he hand-writes some 3000 thank you notes every year) which, in addition to some incredible winemaking, add up to a super-high ratio of customer loyalty. Today Donelan splits his time between his vineyards in California and a kitted-out (for wine lovers, that is) home close to his roots on Nantucket. Look for his wines in shops and restaurants on the island and all over Massachusetts.

Website:
http://www.donelanwines.com/index2.html

BEST BOOKSTORE. There are two, actually— Nantucket Bookworks and Mitchell's Book Corner. Both are excellent because both are oozing with personality. These are not corporations. These are people. They have literally read the books and will gladly share their opinions. But even if you don't actually engage in conversation with anyone working in the shops, you'll feel invited to browse until you find Just The Right Book for your Nantucket getaway.

Websites:
http://www.mitchellsbookcorner.com
http://www.nantucketbookworks.com/

BEST GUEST SERVICE. It's the high season now and Nantucket's service in dustry has officially shifted into gear. The standard-bearer for guest service is, hands down, the White Elephant hotel and residences. Sure there are the things they offer every guest, like van service to the ferries or into town or to a partner restaurant. But come to them with a particular request or problem and they kick it into overdrive. They take it personal. Call it Humane Hospitality. Or just call it whatever it takes to get you one heck of a restful night's sleep.

Website:
http://www.whiteelephanthotel.com/

MUST-DO ACTIVITIES. Rent a bike, or bring your own. Take a Pilates workshop. Visit the Whaling Museum. Take a walking tour with the Nantucket Preservation Trust. Try ice cream flavors you've never had before. Cake batter, anyone?

Websites:
http://www.nantucketpreservation.org/index.html
http://www.easyridersbikerentals.com/
http://www.nha.org/sites/
http://nantucketicecream.com/

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