The Daily Dish

Herbs
By Lidia Bastianich

0 Comments   0 comments.

daily dish banner



Wake up and smell the herbs!

Herbs are one of the quickest and healthiest ways to impart flavor to any dish. They release their fresh flavor when cooked in a dish and then help to reinforce that flavor when added to a dish.

Don’t be afraid to use herbs during cooking or as a way to finish any dish, and if you have any herbs left over, here is a great tip that I also share in my cookbook, Lidia’s Family Table. It will allow you to keep your herbs fresh and usable all year long.

—Divide the fresh herbs in an ice cube trays with deep cubicles.

—Pour cold water to cover the herbs and put in the freezer to freeze.

—The herbs and their flavors will remain embedded in the ice and great for plopping into any drink, or perking up any sauce or soup!

—You now have cubed your herbs for year round use!

To keep these herb “rocks” fresh all year long, seal them in a plastic storage bag and keep them in the freezer.
___________________________________________________________
Lidia Matticchio Bastianich was born in Pola, Istria, on the northeastern coast of the Adriatic Sea. She is a cookbook author, restaurateur, and TV chef extraordinaire. Watch Lidia’s Italy Saturdays at 1:30pm on WGBH 2 or Sundays at 4pm on WGBX 44."

Asian BBQ Chicken Wings
By Ming Tsai

0 Comments   0 comments.

daily dish banner

If you’re like most people, your first encounter with hoisin sauce involved the Chinese dish mu shu pork, in which the sauce serves as a dipper for meat- enclosed pancakes. Today I bring you the flavor of hoisin along with one of my favorite finger foods- WINGS.

Serves 4

Ingredients
2 red onions, rough chopped
2 cups whole San Marzano tomatoes (canned or super ripe)
1 tablespoon sambal
1 cup hoisin sauce
1 cup naturally brewed rice vinegar
3 pounds chicken wings, washed, dried
Canola oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Jicama sticks, for serving

Directions
In a sauce pan coated lightly with oil over medium-high heat, saute onions for about 2 minutes. Add tomatoes, sambal, hoisin and naturally brewed rice vinegar. Bring to a simmer and cook for about 10 minutes. Add kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste.

Using an immersion blender, buzz sauce and check seasoning. Season wings with salt and toss wings in sauce. Marinate as long as you can, up to 24 hours, ideally.
Preheat oven to 475 degrees standard or 450 degrees convection.

Line a rimmed sheet pan with foil and place wings in a single layer in pan. Bake wings for 10-12 minutes or until cooked through and crispy. You could also grill these wings. Serve with jicama sticks.

Drink pairing
Rocca delle Macie Chianti Classico
—Chianti Classico DOCG, Tuscany, Italy

Taste: Rich, well-structured, berry fruit flavors, pairs exceptionally with the Turkey-Tomato Loaf and Michela Larsen’s Hoisin-Glazed Salmon with Heirloom Tomato Salad.

Aroma: Intense, mature fruit aromas

—Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Guarantita, or “controlled and guaranteed designation of origin,” an Italian wine classification for wines with more strict regulations than DOCs, including a specific bottle size, lower allowed yield, required tasting checks and in-depth chemical analyses.

—95% Sangiovese, 5% Merlot

—Produced with grapes from estates situated in the heart of the historical zone of Chianti Classico



Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming.

Italian-Style Corn
Lidia Bastianich

0 Comments   0 comments.

daily dish banner



America loves and is obsessed with corn, and I happen to have an Italian-American love affair with corn! When it’s in season, we do wild things with it on the menu at Felidia, my flagship restaurant in New York City.

I know you grill it, in and out of the husk, or boil it and simply dress with butter and salt.

But for an alternative, when a delicious pot of tomato sauce is perking on your stove, try plopping in some sweet ears of corn. The sauce will be sweeter and the ear of corn, tangier.

Directions
Just shuck the corn
Remove all the silk and rinse the ears
Drop them in the pot of tomato sauce
It’s in and out — 2 minutes will do

And what you’ve got is a delicious new way of eating corn, Italian style!

___________________________________________________________
Lidia Matticchio Bastianich was born in Pola, Istria, on the northeastern coast of the Adriatic Sea. She is a cookbook author, restaurateur, and TV chef extraordinaire. Watch Lidia’s Italy Saturdays at 1:30pm on WGBH 2 or Sundays at 4pm on WGBX 44.

Grilled Peppers
By Lidia Bastianich

0 Comments   0 comments.

daily dish banner



Peter Piper picked a peck of…delicious peppers!

When you go shopping at your local reputable market, get yourself some peppers especially when they are in season. They are delicious, colorful, plentiful, nutritious, and usually inexpensive in the summertime! So what do I do with them, you ask me? It’s simple!

Directions
Grill whole peppers over an open flame, turning periodically until all of the skin blisters.

Set them in a bowl, covered with plastic wrap and let cool.

Peel and scrape off all of the skin under gently running water. Remove the stems and seeds.

Take these delicious morsels and put them in a casserole dish with sliced garlic, olive oil, salt, and fresh or dry oregano. Let steep for half an hour, and when you are ready to serve, add a drizzle of vinegar.

Serve these delicious peppers like we do at my Lidia’s restaurants, as an appetizer, side dish, or sandwich stuffer. Now go pick your peppers!

___________________________________________________________
Lidia Matticchio Bastianich was born in Pola, Istria, on the northeastern coast of the Adriatic Sea. She is a cookbook author, restaurateur, and TV chef extraordinaire. Watch Lidia’s Italy Saturdays at 1:30pm on WGBH 2 or Sundays at 4pm on WGBX 44.

Tips for Grating Cheese
By Lidia Bastianich

0 Comments   0 comments.

daily dish banner

triangle of cheese

Grate that cheese please.

Here are my favorite grating tips for three wonderful Italian cheeses. Whether it's Grana Padano, Parmeggiano Reggiano or Pecorino Romano, I always buy my fresh cheese in a chunk at the store rather than already grated. I like to grate my cheese as close as possible to when I plan on serving my dish.

I add freshly grated cheese to the pot of the fire right before serving. And when I have grated all I can I always save the rinds and plop them into my soups and sauces. This imparts a delicious depth of flavor.

For more tips, check out my latest cookbook, Lidia Cooks from the Heart of Italy.

About the Author

More Recipes from Festival Chefs


Jody Adams' Lentils, Sausages & Grapes
David Blessing's Short Rib Tacos
Chris Coombs Cider Braised Duck Leg
Jose Duarte's Lobster Causa
Jeff Fournier's Cherry Tomato Puttanesca
Rich Garcia's Trash Fish Minestrone
Will Gilson's Smoked Bluefish
Will Gilson's Stuffies
Deborah Hughes & Mary-Catherine Deibel's Red Pepper Soup
Frank McClelland's Pot-au-Feu of Poussin
Brendan Pelley's Seared Scallops
Robert Sisca's Monkfish

 

 

RSS   RSS



Support for WGBH is provided by:
Become a WGBH sponsor

Topics

 
You are on page 34 of 35   |  

myWGBH