Seafood

Seared Haddock with Beans and Greens
By Annie Copps

Tuesday, August 10, 2010
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Not sure what to have for dinner tonight? I have a quick, easy, healthy and inexpensive meal that will put dinner on the table in 30 minutes. The main ingredients – local white fish and fresh field greens.

Serves 4

Ingredients
½ cup olive oil
3 cloves garlic
1 pound fresh, local white fish (cod, haddock, or whatever is on sale)
1 can of cannellini or garbanzo beans
4 cups of fresh field greens (spring mix, baby romaine, arugula)
Juice from ½ lemon
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions
Saute 2 cloves of very thinly sliced garlic in olive oil (about ½ cup—it’s a lot, but you can use the oil after for other things). Start with cold oil in the pan (it tends to burn if you start with hot oil) and let the garlic cook until just lightly golden brown — about 3 minutes, but keep your eye on it (dark brown or burned means bitter).

Drain the garlic onto paper towels. Pour all but 1 tablespoon of the oil into a bowl and set aside.

Cut the fish into portions, season with salt and pepper, and brown on both sides. Just put it in the pan and don’t move it for 2 minutes; then turn it and cook until it’s cooked through (depends on the fish and the thickness, but 3 minutes oughta do it).

Rinse well and drain 1 can of white beans (I used garbanzo, but cannellini or gigante are great for this, too). In a medium bowl, combine four cups of spring mix or baby romaine with beans, toasted garlic, the juice of half a lemon, and about 1 tablespoon of the cooled garlic oil. Season with salt and pepper. Divide onto four plates and place the fish on top.



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Annie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine’s food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

Lobster Nachos By Annie Copps

Monday, April 11, 2011
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lobster nacho with lime

Yield: 2 dozen pieces

Nachos, made with lobster. What is this nonsense you say? C'mon, why not? I am not talking about corn chips smothered in oddly colored cheese at the baseball game (not that they don't have a spot in my culinary heart). I am talking about a slightly elevated hors d'oeuvre that you'll have trouble walking away from.

Instead of a salsa with all kinds of spices and gobs of other toppings, these nachos are quick and easy appetizer with just a few top notch ingredients that really sing. The delicious fun begins by mashing a ripe avocado and mixing in chopped cilantro and a bit of lime juice. Arrange corn chips onto a serving platter—if you can find blue corn chips, this will be even more beautiful. Spoon the avocado mixture on tip of the chips then dot the chips with chopped fresh lobster—you won't need much, about a quarter pound. Sprinkle the top with a bit more cilantro and your work is done—I say OLE to that.

Ingredients
1 large ripe avocado
1 ½ tablespoons fresh chopped cilantro, plus extra for garnish
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice
kosher or sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
4 ounces lobster meat, roughly chopped
8 ounces blue corn chips

Directions
In a small bowl, mash avocado; add cilantro and lime juice.

Season to taste with salt and pepper to taste.

Place 1 teaspoon avocado mixture onto individual corn chips, top with 1 teaspoon lobster and sprinkle with cilantro.

Serve immediately.

(Courtesy: Yankee Magazine)
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annie coppsAnnie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine's food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

Union Oyster House Turns 185

By Adam Reilly   |   Wednesday, August 3, 2011
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Aug. 3, 2011



BOSTON — After nearly two centuries of existence, Union Oyster House has its own unique body of lore: From JFK’s favorite booth to a plaque honoring Boston’s first female waitress. And as the restaurant celebrates its 185th anniversary Wednesday, business remains brisk.

Danny Martinez is a teacher visiting from San Diego. During Tuesday’s lunch hour, he enjoyed oysters, cherrystones and a beer. 

Mussels are served at the Union Oyster House. (avhell via Flickr)

“I did my homework because I’m a teacher,” said Martinez. “I did a lot of yelping, go to Yelp.com, and this definitely came up as one of the top one to two (seafood restaurants) in the Boston area.”
 
Sitting a few yards away, Joe King of County Galway, Ireland was wrapping up a meal of his own — his first since arriving in Boston earlier today. King gives the Union Oyster House’s namesake specialties his stamp of approval, but adds that the legendary oysters from his hometown are even better.
 
“Well, they’re good here,” King said. “But I think we have better oysters in Clarinbridge.”
 
With customers from as far away as the West Coast and Europe, it’s no wonder the Union Oyster House has a bit of a reputation as a tourist magnet. Its amply stocked gift shop indicates the restaurant is happy to play the part.

Still, after 185 years in business, there are a few regulars with strong local ties.
 
“I’m from Charlestown, Mass., originally,” said Tom Roche, as he sat at the Union Oyster House’s legenday U-shaped oyster bar. “I live in California now. Came here for the oysters clams and scallops today... I come back here every year, and this is the place I come to.”
 
On August 3, the Union Oyster House will celebrate its 185th year of existence with a special menu featuring thirty dollars worth of food for just $1.85. That price is only good from 11 AM to 3 PM, but if you miss it,  take heart. This isn’t the Union Oyster House’s first anniversary special, and chances are it won’t be its last. 

Sake-Black Pepper Mussels With Granny Smith Apples
By Ming Tsai

Wednesday, November 10, 2010
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Sake-Black Pepper Mussels With Granny Smith Apples

Apples may seem like a funny match for mussels, but believe-you-me the tartness and sweetness of apples play beautifully against the natural brininess of the mussels and a little bit of sake adds yet another element that makes this dish delicious.

Ingredients
1 tablespoon minced garlic
3 large shallots, sliced
1 tablespoon coarsely ground black pepper
2 pounds PEI mussels, scrubbed, bearded
1 cup sake
1/4 cup ponzu
1 large green apple, peeled, julienned
2 tablespoons butter
Togarashi for garnish
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Canola oil for cooking

Directions
In a wok over high heat coated lightly with oil, stir-fry garlic, shallots, and black pepper; add mussels and season. Deglaze with sake and cover to open mussels.

When mussels are starting to open, add ponzu, green apple and butter.

Cover for about 30 seconds to allow flavors to meld.

Serve in a large bowl and garnish with togarashi.

Swordfish-Bacon Kebabs with Cilantro Gremolata
By Ming Tsai

Wednesday, December 22, 2010
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Swordfish-Bacon Kebabs with Cilantro Gremolata

Ingredients
1 cup chopped cilantro
3 lemons, zested and juiced
1 tablespoon minced garlic
2 stalks lemongrass, white part only, finely minced
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
12 slices of bacon
1 pint cherry tomatoes
1 1/2 pounds center-cut swordfish, cut into 1x1-inch cubes
4-8 long satay skewers, soaked in water
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Cooking spray

Directions
Prepare a hot grill, sprayed slick.

In a bowl, combine the cilantro, lemon zest and juice, garlic, lemongrass and extra virgin olive oil. Season with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste.

Assemble the kebabs by first skewering one end of the bacon and following with swordfish cube.

Weave the bacon in between the swordfish and tomato as you thread each onto the skewer.

Lay the kebabs in a dish and take 1/3 of the gremolata and rub all over kebabs. Let marinate for at least 20 minutes.

Season the kebabs with salt and pepper and grill until bacon is cooked through, about 8 minutes.

Plate using a satay plate and serve with remaining gremolata in dipping bowl.

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chef ming tsai
Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming and chef/owner of Blue Ginger restaurant in Wellesley, Mass.

Clam Chowder
By Annie Copps

Thursday, November 4, 2010
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bowl of chowder

I'm a New Englander through and through and ergo, I enjoy clam chowder. But with apologies to my mother, I'm offerng my own recipe for this comfort food classic. This recipe includes all the traditional ingredients of true New England clam chowder: It's rich and thick without being glunky because we've all had that bad bowl of glue.

Ingredients
7 pounds cherrystone clams, well-scrubbed and rinsed
3 cups water
4 strips bacon, finely chopped
1 medium Spanish onion, diced small
2 tablespoons flour
3 large red potatoes, cut into 1/2-inch dice
1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
1 cup heavy cream

Directions
In a large soup pot over high heat, add clams to 3 cups water. Bring to a boil and cook just until clams open, about 10 minutes. Remove clams from broth and set aside. (Discard any clams that don't open.) Strain broth through a sieve lined with a coffee filter and set aside.

Clean your soup pot; then over medium-high heat, sauté bacon until it's browned and fat is rendered. Using a slotted spoon, remove bacon to a paper towel. Discard all but 2 tablespoons of bacon fat.

Add diced onion to the pot and sautê until translucent. Stir in flour and cook 1 minute, being careful not to brown. Whisk in reserved clam broth. Add potatoes and thyme, and simmer 10 minutes.

Remove clams from shells, reserving liquid, and chop roughly. Strain liquid; then add clams and liquid to the pot. Stir in parsley and cream and cook just long enough to heat clams through, about 3 minutes.

(Courtesy: Yankee Magazine)

___________________________________________________________
annie coppsAnnie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine's food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

About the Author
Adam Reilly Adam Reilly
Adam Reilly is a political reporter and associate producer for WGBH's Greater Boston.

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