Pasta

Soy-Braised Short Ribs
By Ming Tsai

Monday, August 9, 2010
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Who doesn't loooove ribs? Today east meets west — and goes south — with my Soy-Braised Short Ribs, a hearty main dish that is a great one-pot meal you can make either in your slow cooker or on your stovetop. I guarantee these ribs will be fall-off-the-bone delicious and will wow your barbecue guests with the flavor of kechap manis.

Serves 4

Ingredients
6 2×3 short ribs (about 4x3x2)
2 tablespoons coarse ground black pepper
Coarse ground sea salt
1 cup all-purpose flour
3 large carrots, peeled, roll cut
4 stalks celery, roll cut
2 yellow onions, 1 inch dice
5 slices of ginger
2 cups red wine
1 cup kechap manis
Water to cover
Rehydrated rice stick noodles, to serve
Canola oil to cook
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions
Place a stovetop-safe slow cooker insert over medium-high heat, coated lightly with oil. In a pie plate, combine pepper and flour. Season ribs well and coat with flour. Place short ribs in oil and sear until browned on both sides, about 12-15 minutes. Remove short ribs to a plate and wipe out pan. Add just enough oil to lightly coat and add carrots, celery, onions, and ginger. Season with salt and pepper and sweat until just softened. Deglaze with wine and allow to reduce by 25%. Add kechap manis and short ribs and pour in just enough water to almost cover. Check for flavor and season if necessary. Cook on high setting in slow cooker for 4-5 hours. Serve hot with rice stick noodles.

Ming’s wine suggestion
2004 Kangarilla Road McLaren Vale Shiraz, McLaren Vale, Australia

Flavor: Spicy, dark berry with nuances of dark plum
Aroma: Deeply aromatic, with notes of mulberry followed by black and red berry fruits
Finish: Soft tannins

—Aged in French and American oak
—Made up of grapes from 3 separate locations, each yielding slightly different aromas and flavor profiles, resulting in a complex, multifaceted wine. This is a great match with the Soy-Braised Short Ribs.


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ming tsai thumbnail holding lime
Chef Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the nation.

Roasted Chicken with Beer
By Lidia Bastianich

Friday, August 6, 2010
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Everyone likes a good beer now and then, and not only to drink. I like to cook with it. As much as Italians love their wine, a good beer is enjoyed every now and then, and it’s even used in cooking — so next time you’re roasting chicken, think of adding some beer to it.

Ingredients
Whole chicken
Carrots
Celery
Onion
Fresh garlic
Sage leaves
Beer
Salt

Directions
Find your favorite recipe for roasted chicken.

Set your chicken to rest in a baking casserole. Now add some carrots, celery, onion, fresh garlic and sage leaves.

Season all with salt. Pour in a bottle a beer such as a pale ale, some stock and roast.

Be sure to baste the chicken periodically and it will not only be honey golden but taste savory and delicious.

With a glass a beer, what a perfect meal!

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Lidia Matticchio Bastianich was born in Pola, Istria, on the northeastern coast of the Adriatic Sea. She is a cookbook author, restaurateur, and TV chef extraordinaire. Watch Lidia’s Italy Saturdays at 1:30pm on WGBH 2 or Sundays at 4pm on WGBX 44.

Baked Penne & Mushrooms
By Lidia Bastianich

Friday, August 6, 2010
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Pasticcio di Penne alla Valdostana

Serves 6

Ingredients
1 teaspoon kosher salt
8 ounces fontina from Valle d’Aosta
1 cup freshly grated Grana Padano or Parmigiano- Reggiano, plus more for passing
4 tablespoons soft butter
1 pound mixed fresh mushrooms (such as porcini, shiitake, cremini, and common
white mushrooms), cleaned and sliced
1 cup half and half
1 pound penne
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley

Directions
Arrange a rack in the middle of the oven and heat to 400º. Fill the pasta pot with 6 quarts water, add 1 tablespoon salt, and heat to the boil. Shred the fontina through the larger holes of a hand grater, and toss the shreds with ½ cup of the grana (grated Grana Padano or Parmigiano-Reggiano).

Put 3 tablespoons of the butter in the big skillet, and set it over medium- high heat. When the butter begins to bubble, drop in the mushroom slices, stir with the butter, season with the teaspoon salt, and spread the mushrooms out to cover the pan bottom. Let the mushrooms heat, without stirring, until they release their liquid and it comes to a boil.

Cook the mushrooms, stirring occasionally, as they shrivel and the liquid rapidly evaporates. When the skillet bottom is completely dry, stir the half and half into the mushrooms, stir, and bring the sauce to a boil. Cook it rapidly for a minute or two to thicken slightly, then keep it warm over very low heat.

Meanwhile, stir the penne into the boiling pasta water and cook until barely al dente (still somewhat undercooked to the bite). Ladle a cup of the pasta cooking water into the mushroom sauce and stir. Drain the pasta briefly, and drop into the cream-and-mushroom sauce. Toss the penne until all are nicely coated, then sprinkle over them the remaining ½ cup of grana (not mixed with fontina) and the chopped parsley. Toss to blend.

Coat the bottom and sides of the baking dish with the last tablespoon of butter. Empty the skillet into the dish, spreading the penne and sauce to fill the dish completely in a uniform layer. Smooth the top, and sprinkle the mixed fontina-grana evenly all over.

Set the dish in the oven, and bake 20 to 25 minutes, until the cheese topping is crusty and deep golden brown and the sauce is bubbling up at the edges. Set the hot baking dish on a trivet at the table, and serve family-style.

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Lidia Matticchio Bastianich was born in Pola, Istria, on the northeastern coast of the Adriatic Sea. She is a cookbook author, restaurateur, and TV chef extraordinaire. Watch Lidia’s Italy Saturdays at 1:30pm on WGBH 2 or Sundays at 4pm on WGBX 44."

Soba Noodle-Shrimp Pancakes By Ming Tsai

Monday, August 9, 2010
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You may think that pasta is only as flavorful as its sauce, but that would mean you haven’t tried Japanese soba noodles. Made of buckwheat, they have an earthy, nutty flavor that evokes the countryside, which is why I’ve paired them with an Italian ingredient that has the same effect, pancetta. And this east-west pair is going to be the platform for today’s all in one dish: my Soba Noodle Shrimp Pancakes.

Serves 4

Ingredients
2 eggs
1 pound shrimp
1/4 cup chopped parsley, plus some leaves for garnish
2 tablespoons yuzu or fresh lemon juice
1 cup diced, rendered pancetta, cooled
2 cups blanched soba noodles (leave a pinhole of rawness in center)
Chopped parsley, for garnish (optional)
Canola oil for frying
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions
In a food processor fitted with blade, add the eggs and shrimp and pulse until chopped into a chunky mousse. Season with salt and pepper. Have soba noodles in a large bowl and pour mousse over noodles. Fold in parsley, yuzu and pancetta. Check flavor by cooking a small portion and season if necessary. Spread noodle pancake mixture in an even layer in a sauté pan over high heat coated with oil. Shallow fry pancakes until golden, brown and delicious, both sides, about 6 minutes. Cut into wedges and garnish with parsley.

Drink pairings
Sapporo Beer
—From Japan

A lager, quite refreshing with a moderately light body. Pairs very nicely with the Soba Noodle-Shrimp Pancakes.

Jean Luc Colombo Rose
—Provence, France
Taste: Surprisingly complex, with intriguing notes of raspberry, cherry and black olive
Aroma: Subtle hints of peach, rose petals and pepper on the nose

Colombo is hailed as “the winemaking wizard of the Rhone” for introducing innovative methods in his vineyards and throughout the production process while making well-regarded, original wines. He believes good wine relies on 3 key elements: terroir, human endeavor and modern winemaking techniques.

—Enjoy on its own or with a wide range of appetizers, fish, poultry dishes and vegetarian fare. This wines pairs equally well with Michel Richard’s Beet Soba Bolognese and Ming’s Soba Noodle Carbonara.

—40% Syrah, 40% Mourvedre, 20% Counoise

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Chef Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the nation.

Quick skillet mac and Cheese -

By Susie Middleton   |   Monday, March 12, 2012
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Pasta E Fagioli By Annie Copps

Tuesday, April 19, 2011
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bowl of pasta e fagioli

When the stars make you drool, just like a pasta fazool, that's amore… Or so the big Dean Martin song goes. Once you try this recipe for pasta e fagioli, a hearty and delicious soup made from pasta and beans, I think you'll find some love in a bowl.

This take on the classic soup comes from by dear friend Anthony Giglio, who is a bit of a renaissance man with an encyclopedic knowledge of wine, story telling abilities of a bard, and the generosity of a saint. His recipe comes from his Neapolitan grandmothers who made this cucina povera staple when cranberry beans were fresh in the markets, or for Friday suppers that weren't during meatless Lent.

Yield: 8 servings

Ingredients
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil, plus extra for drizzling
1/2 medium red onion, diced
1 carrot, diced
1 rib celery, diced
4 pork spare ribs
1 cup crushed plum tomatoes (peeled and seeded)
2 8-oz cans cranberry or red kidney beans, drained and rinsed
4 cups beef broth (low sodium)
kosher or sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/2 pound tubettini or small shells pasta
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
2 tablespoons grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese, plus extra for garnish
Garnish

Directions
In a large soup or sauce pot over medium high heat, saute onion in olive oil until golden, then add carrot and celery, stirring to coat well. Cook 2 to 3 minutes.

Push vegetables to the edges of the pan and add pork chops, browning them gently on all sides, about 10 minutes. Add tomatoes and stir well, scraping up any stuck bits from the bottom of the pan.

Bring to boil, then lower heat to simmer and cook for 20 minutes. Add beans, stir well, and cook for 5 minutes. Add broth, bring to gentle simmer for 5 minutes.

Remove meat from bones, roughly chop, and return to soup.

Scoop out half the beans and pass through food mill over the pot, or pulse in blender and return to pot. Season with salt and pepper.

Before adding pasta to soup, make sure soup is liquid enough to handle the pasta (if somewhat thick, add a half cup of water, bring to boil), then add pasta and stir frequently to prevent sticking. (Soup will thicken as pasta absorbs the liquid). Remove from heat just before pasta is cooked through, al dente—about 6 minutes.

Add butter and cheese and stir well. Ladle soup in to warmed soup bowls and let rest at least five minutes; it will thicken more as it cools.

Swirl olive oil in a circle over each bowl and served with a pepper mill and bowl of cheese to pass at the table.
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annie coppsAnnie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine's food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

About the Author
Susie Middleton Susie Middleton
Susie Middleton is editor at large for Fine Cooking magazine and the author of veggie cookbooks Fast, Fresh & Green and The Fresh & Green Table.

Follow her on Twitter at @sixburnersue

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