Rice and Grains

Anadama Bread By Annie Copps

Tuesday, August 3, 2010
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anadama breadThis is definitely a New England recipe. Anadama bread is one of the most popular breads here, and for good reason—it's absolutely delicious. Try smearing a mixture of butter and local honey on it and, you'll be hooked. This is my friend and mentor chef Jasper White's recipe, Jasper uses a bit more corn meal and less molasses than most recipes, so it serves dual roles as a breakfast bread or alongside hearty chowders.

Preparation Time: 30 minutes
Start to Finish Time: 1.5 hours
Yield: 2 loaves

Ingredients
1 package active dry yeast
1 tablespoon sugar
1-1/4 cups (approx.) warm water (105-115 degrees), divided
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted, cooled to room temperature
2 tablespoons dark molasses
2 teaspoons salt
3-1/2 cups bread flour, plus extra for work surface
1 cup yellow cornmeal
Vegetable oil or butter
1 large egg, beaten with 2 tablespoons water (egg wash)

Directions
In a medium-size bowl (or the bowl of a standing mixer with hook attachment), combine yeast, sugar, and 1/4 cup warm water; mix well. Add melted butter, molasses, salt, flour, and cornmeal. Slowly add up to 1 cup more warm water; mix to form a soft, but not sticky, dough. Add more water if necessary. Knead by machine about 10 minutes, or by hand about 15 minutes, until dough is smooth and elastic.

Oil (or butter) a large bowl lightly. Shape dough into a ball and place in the bowl; turn it once so it's lightly greased all over. Cover with plastic wrap or a damp cloth and place in a warm, draft-free spot. Let dough rise until volume doubles, about 1 hour.

Grease two 9-1/2x5-inch loaf pans. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Cut in half and shape each half into a loaf. Place each loaf in a pan, return to a warm spot, and let rise until volume doubles, about 20 to 30 minutes.

Heat your oven to 350 degrees. Brush the tops of the loaves with egg wash and bake 1 hour, or until deep golden brown. To test for doneness, remove one hot loaf from its pan and tap the bottom of the bread; you'll hear a hollow sound if it's done. If it's not done, return it to the oven for 5 to 10 minutes. When loaves are done, turn them out of their pans and cool on a rack for at least 20 minutes.

(Adapted from 50 Chowders: One-Pot Meals—Clam, Corn & Beyond by Jasper White)

Soy-Braised Short Ribs
By Ming Tsai

Monday, August 9, 2010
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Who doesn't loooove ribs? Today east meets west — and goes south — with my Soy-Braised Short Ribs, a hearty main dish that is a great one-pot meal you can make either in your slow cooker or on your stovetop. I guarantee these ribs will be fall-off-the-bone delicious and will wow your barbecue guests with the flavor of kechap manis.

Serves 4

Ingredients
6 2×3 short ribs (about 4x3x2)
2 tablespoons coarse ground black pepper
Coarse ground sea salt
1 cup all-purpose flour
3 large carrots, peeled, roll cut
4 stalks celery, roll cut
2 yellow onions, 1 inch dice
5 slices of ginger
2 cups red wine
1 cup kechap manis
Water to cover
Rehydrated rice stick noodles, to serve
Canola oil to cook
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions
Place a stovetop-safe slow cooker insert over medium-high heat, coated lightly with oil. In a pie plate, combine pepper and flour. Season ribs well and coat with flour. Place short ribs in oil and sear until browned on both sides, about 12-15 minutes. Remove short ribs to a plate and wipe out pan. Add just enough oil to lightly coat and add carrots, celery, onions, and ginger. Season with salt and pepper and sweat until just softened. Deglaze with wine and allow to reduce by 25%. Add kechap manis and short ribs and pour in just enough water to almost cover. Check for flavor and season if necessary. Cook on high setting in slow cooker for 4-5 hours. Serve hot with rice stick noodles.

Ming’s wine suggestion
2004 Kangarilla Road McLaren Vale Shiraz, McLaren Vale, Australia

Flavor: Spicy, dark berry with nuances of dark plum
Aroma: Deeply aromatic, with notes of mulberry followed by black and red berry fruits
Finish: Soft tannins

—Aged in French and American oak
—Made up of grapes from 3 separate locations, each yielding slightly different aromas and flavor profiles, resulting in a complex, multifaceted wine. This is a great match with the Soy-Braised Short Ribs.


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ming tsai thumbnail holding lime
Chef Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the nation.

Creamy Risotto with Baby Shrimp and Bok Choy
By Ming Tsai

Thursday, August 12, 2010
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Serves 4

Ingredients
1 tablespoon minced garlic
2 minced shallots
2 tablespoons minced lemongrass
2 cups koshi hikari or similar sushi rice (or Arborio rice)
1 cup white wine
2-3 cups chicken stock, hot
1 pound baby Contessa shrimp
3 heads baby bok choy, shredded
4 tablespoons room temperature cream cheese
Minced chives, for garnish
Olive oil to cook
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions
Coat a skillet over medium heat lightly with olive oil and saute the garlic, shallots, and lemongrass for about 2 minutes. Add the rice, stir to coat with oil and season. Deglaze with white wine and reduce by 75%. Slowly add stock a ladle at a time, stirring rice until each ladle of liquid is absorbed. When just beyond al dente, add the shrimp and bok choy to heat through. Add cream cheese to melt, check again for flavor and garnish with chives. Serve.

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ming tsai thumbnail holding limeChef Ming Tsai is a local restaurateur and host of Simply Ming.

Farro Salad By Annie Copps

Tuesday, August 10, 2010
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The key to this hearty salad is the ancient Italian grain farro. You could substitute with brown rice, spelt, or even barley, but farro is pretty easy to find and it is more flavorful. Now that I know about it, I cook up a batch and add it to salads all the time.

Ingredients
3 cups cooked farro (substitute with barley or spelt)
4 to 5 sun- or oven-dried tomatoes, roughly chopped
1/3 cup crumbled feta cheese
6 to 8 basil leaves, roughly chopped
2 to 3 scallions, finely chopped
1/4 cup olive oil
1 tablespoon red-wine or balsamic vinegar

Directions
In a medium bowl or zip-top bag, combine ingredients until well mixed.

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annie coppsAnnie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine's food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

Coconut-Cranberry Chicken Curry
By Ming Tsai

Thursday, September 9, 2010
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Coconut-Cranberry Chicken Curry

What happens when you take coconut milk from the East and combine it cranberries from the west? Well, you get today's dish: a quick Coconut-Cranberry Chicken Curry that introduces India to Cape Cod.

Ingredients
6-8 chicken thighs, skin on, bone in, seasoned for 10 minutes before cooking
2 red onions, sliced
2 sweet potatoes, peeled, 1/2-inch dice
1 tablespoon minced ginger
1 heaping tablespoon minced jalapeno
heaping 1/2 cup Craisins
2 tablespoon Madras curry powder
1 13.5 ounce can of coconut milk
1 cup water
Canola oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Steamed Brown Rice

Directions
In a cast iron skillet or stockpot coated very lightly with oil on medium-high heat, sear the chicken, skin-side down, and completely render the fat.

Flip and brown meat-side. Remove chicken. Wipe out excess fat and saute the onions, potatoes, ginger, jalapeno, Craisins and curry powder and season. Add coconut milk and water, check for seasoning, then add chicken back. Bring to a simmer and cook chicken through, about 45 minutes. Serve family style on rice.

Beverage pairing
Jean-Luc Colombo La Violette Viognier From Pays d'Oc, Southern France. The aroma is intensely violet, which is where it gets its name, with nuances of licorice, lychee, apricot and peach. Well-structured, finishes with elegance and opulent fruit. 100% Viognier

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ming tsai thumbnail holding limeChef Ming Tsai is a local restaurateur and host of Simply Ming.

Baked Penne & Mushrooms
By Lidia Bastianich

Friday, August 6, 2010
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Pasticcio di Penne alla Valdostana

Serves 6

Ingredients
1 teaspoon kosher salt
8 ounces fontina from Valle d’Aosta
1 cup freshly grated Grana Padano or Parmigiano- Reggiano, plus more for passing
4 tablespoons soft butter
1 pound mixed fresh mushrooms (such as porcini, shiitake, cremini, and common
white mushrooms), cleaned and sliced
1 cup half and half
1 pound penne
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley

Directions
Arrange a rack in the middle of the oven and heat to 400º. Fill the pasta pot with 6 quarts water, add 1 tablespoon salt, and heat to the boil. Shred the fontina through the larger holes of a hand grater, and toss the shreds with ½ cup of the grana (grated Grana Padano or Parmigiano-Reggiano).

Put 3 tablespoons of the butter in the big skillet, and set it over medium- high heat. When the butter begins to bubble, drop in the mushroom slices, stir with the butter, season with the teaspoon salt, and spread the mushrooms out to cover the pan bottom. Let the mushrooms heat, without stirring, until they release their liquid and it comes to a boil.

Cook the mushrooms, stirring occasionally, as they shrivel and the liquid rapidly evaporates. When the skillet bottom is completely dry, stir the half and half into the mushrooms, stir, and bring the sauce to a boil. Cook it rapidly for a minute or two to thicken slightly, then keep it warm over very low heat.

Meanwhile, stir the penne into the boiling pasta water and cook until barely al dente (still somewhat undercooked to the bite). Ladle a cup of the pasta cooking water into the mushroom sauce and stir. Drain the pasta briefly, and drop into the cream-and-mushroom sauce. Toss the penne until all are nicely coated, then sprinkle over them the remaining ½ cup of grana (not mixed with fontina) and the chopped parsley. Toss to blend.

Coat the bottom and sides of the baking dish with the last tablespoon of butter. Empty the skillet into the dish, spreading the penne and sauce to fill the dish completely in a uniform layer. Smooth the top, and sprinkle the mixed fontina-grana evenly all over.

Set the dish in the oven, and bake 20 to 25 minutes, until the cheese topping is crusty and deep golden brown and the sauce is bubbling up at the edges. Set the hot baking dish on a trivet at the table, and serve family-style.

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Lidia Matticchio Bastianich was born in Pola, Istria, on the northeastern coast of the Adriatic Sea. She is a cookbook author, restaurateur, and TV chef extraordinaire. Watch Lidia’s Italy Saturdays at 1:30pm on WGBH 2 or Sundays at 4pm on WGBX 44."

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