Snacks

Fruit Roll Ups By Annie Copps

Tuesday, August 24, 2010
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Kids are crazy for fruit roll-ups and you won't believe how incredibly easy they are to make. Kids love them, and they're perfect to pack along on any movable feast. I have found that peaches, mangos, and most berries work best (avoid bananas, melons, or citrus). They are, of course, best in the season that the fruit is growing in, but frozen fruits work well, too.

Yield: about 5 pieces

Ingredients
2 cups pureed fruit
1 to 2 tablespoons honey

Directions
Heat oven to 200.°

In a small mixing bowl, stir ingredients well to combine. Line a baking sheet with waxed paper or a Silpat mat. Ladle puree onto baking sheet and spread into a very thin (about 1/8 inch) circle, about 8 inches in diameter. Repeat with remaining puree. Place in oven 5 to 6 hours or until dried but still flexible. Cool and wrap in plastic.

(Courtesy: Yankee Magazine)
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annie coppsAnnie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine's food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

Irish Soda Bread By Annie Copps

Monday, March 14, 2011
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sliced irish soda bread

Any leprechaun of note will tell you that the key to good soda bread is not to get yourself or the dough overworked in the process. Kind of like a giant biscuit, soda bread is easy and quick to make, but if not made properly it can be dry and tough, or undercooked in the middle. The line between a pleasant pastry fit for a smear of butter and jam and a leaden block of cooked flour fit for the garbage bin, can be a fine one.

Like any dough or batter, gluten, the protein in flour (activated by water) gives baked goods their structure. In the case of traditional bread, the gluten needs to be worked into long strands, via kneading, so that hot air can get in between those strands and puff it up. In the case of cakes, muffins, and “quick” breads it is important to mix the ingredients together, just until they are combined and holding together so things don’t get too tough inside.

Traditional Irish soda bread is made from only four ingredients: flour, baking soda, salt, and milk, for this recipe I added some baking powder, to really keep things light. Whisk together some flour, sugar, baking powder and baking soda. Add in melted butter, caraway seeds, and some golden raisins. In a separate bowl combine some buttermilk and egg and combined JUST until incorporated—remember, don’t overwork things. Form into a round and make an “X” on top. Bake and you’ve got yourself a pot of gold waiting to come out of the oven.

Yield: One loaf
Total time: 1 hour 15 minutes; active time: 30 minutes

Ingredients
3 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup sugar
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 tablespoon baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
4 tablespoons unsalted butter (1/2 stick), melted
2 tablespoons caraway seeds, optional
1 cup golden raisins
1 cup buttermilk
1 egg

Directions
Heat oven to 350 degrees.

In a standing mixer with a paddle attachment, bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking powder, soda, and salt. Add butter, caraway (if using) and raisins; combine just until incorporated.

In a small bowl, whisk together buttermilk and egg; add to dough and mix just until incorporated. Turn dough onto a lightly floured work surface and fold it over onto itself 2 or 3 times, shaping it into a round, 8-inch loaf. Transfer loaf to a parchment or silpat lined baking sheet. Score an “X” on the top of the dough. Bake 45 minutes until well-browned and a toothpick plunged into the center emerges clean.

Remove to a wire rack to cool completely before slicing. Serve with butter and your favorite jam or preserves.

Baking Soda and Baking Powder
Both baking soda and baking powder are variations on sodium bicarbonate which produces carbon dioxide, which gives baked goods a bit of rise.

Baking Soda
Baking soda is pure sodium bicarbonate. And is a quick to cause bubbles when combined with moisture, especially when heated.

Baking Powder
Baking powder contains sodium bicarbonate, as well as cream of tartar (an acidic) and cornstarch (which keeps things dry). Baking powder has a bit more staying power without as much acidity.

(Courtesy: Yankee Magazine)

___________________________________________________________
annie coppsAnnie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine's food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

Homemade Granola
By Annie Copps

Friday, August 6, 2010
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Monday through Friday, I eat breakfast on the go—usually a cup of coffee and a bowl of yogurt with granola. Store bought granola can have some hidden ingredients, too much salt, and sugar as well as extra calories that may not be the best way for you to start the day.

Preparation Time: 20 minutes
Start to Finish Time: 1.5 hours
Yield: about 5 cups

Ingredients
3 cups rolled oats
1 cup whole almonds
3/4 cup shredded coconut
1/3 cup plus 2 tablespoons dark brown sugar
1/3 cup plus 2 tablespoons maple syrup
1/4 cup vegetable oil
3/4 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
1 cup raisins or chopped dried cherries

Directions
Heat oven to 250.° In a large bowl, combine all ingredients except raisins (or cherries); make sure oats, almonds, and coconut are well coated with sugar, syrup, and oil. Spread out on one large baking sheet (or two small sheets). Bake 1 hour, stirring every 15 minutes for even browning.

Remove the sheet from the oven and let cool on wire racks. Scoop or pour granola into a large bowl, add raisins or cherries, and mix well. Store in well-sealed containers at room temperature up to two weeks.

(Courtesy: Yankee Magazine)
___________________________________________________________
annie coppsAnnie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine's food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

Sesame Butter Brittle
By Ming Tsai

Thursday, October 14, 2010
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sesame butter brittle

Ingredients
4 ounces (1 stick) unsalted butter
1 cup sugar
3/4 cup white sesame seeds, toasted
1 teaspoon sea salt (Hawaiian or white)

Directions
In a medium saucepot over high heat, melt butter and sugar and stir to combine. Without stirring, cook until mixture becomes a light to medium caramel color, about 3-5 minutes, then add sesame seeds and stir in.

Pour mixture onto a * silpat and spread into an even, thin layer, about 1/8 to /4-inch thick, with wooden spoon. (Don't worry if shape is irregular.) Immediately sprinkle sea salt over top of mixture and lightly press into caramel using spoon. Allow to set-up for about 10-15 minutes. When brittle has hardened and cooled, break into pieces and enjoy. Store in an air-tight container.

*If not using a silpat* use a 1/2 sheet pan with parchment sprayed generously with cooking spray or wax paper.

Zesty Applesauce
By Lidia Bastianich

Thursday, October 7, 2010
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apples

Everyone loves a good applesauce. So why don't you try the zesty version straight from Northern Italy? I know that once you have tasted this dish, a recipe found in my cookbook, Lidia Cooks from the Heart of Italy, you will never go back to the plain applesauce.

Directions
Set the applesauce in a pan. Make your own or pick some up at the store.

Add a squeeze of fresh lemon juice, some freshly grated horseradish…and yes horseradish root is available at most grocery stores. It resembles a carrot and like a carrot you can peel it and shred it.

Let the apple, lemon and shredded horseradish cook together.

Once it is perking add ½ a cup of heavy cream.

Stir well to allow all of the flavors to combine.

Serve this delightfully tangy applesauce warm along side a luscious ham, turkey, chicken or roast beef.
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lidia bastianichLidia Matticchio Bastianich was born in Pola, Istria, on the northeastern coast of the Adriatic Sea. She is a cookbook author, restaurateur, and TV chef extraordinaire. Watch Lidia's Italy Saturdays at 1:30pm on WGBH 2 or Sundays at 4pm on WGBX 44.

Wine Loves Chocolate, Chocolate Loves Wine

Wednesday, January 9, 2013
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