Appetizers

Black Pepper Teriyaki Chicken and Pineapple
By Ming Tsai

Tuesday, August 24, 2010
0 Comments   0 comments.

daily dish banner



I used to make my own soy syrup, but it was very delicate and had a tendency to break like an aioli. But one day my Indonesian sous chef Budi introduced me to Kechap Manis, a great sweet soy syrup from his country. I said, "Wow, Budi, you just saved me a lot of steps!" And now I use Kechap Manis all the time as a base for glazes and sauces... like my Black Pepper-Teriyaki Chicken and Pineapple Satays, a terrific grilled appetizer you can serve any time you're looking for tasty finger food. Serves 4 as an appetizer

Ingredients
3 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into 1-inch cubes
1 small pineapple, cut into 1-inch cubes
2/3 cup kechap manis
2 oranges, zested and juiced, minced zest for garnish
1 tablespoon minced ginger
1 tablespoon coarse ground black pepper
1 bunch scallions sliced thinly, separate white and green
Bamboo skewers, soaked in water for at least 1 hour
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Cooking spray

Directions
Assemble satays by alternating chicken and pineapple. In a large bowl, combine kechap manis, orange juice, ginger, black pepper and scallion whites. Add satays and marinate for 15 minutes.

Prepare a hot grill, sprayed slick. Remove satays from marinade, reserving marinade. Grill satays until chicken is cooked through, about 3-4 minutes per side.

Meanwhile, boil marinade for a dipping sauce and use some of it to brush onto satays while cooking.

Serve in bamboo satay plate with dipping sauce garnished with scallion greens.

Garnish satays with orange zest and scallion greens.

__________________________________________________________

Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming.

Swordfish-Bacon Kebabs with Cilantro Gremolata
By Ming Tsai

Wednesday, December 22, 2010
0 Comments   0 comments.

daily dish banner

Swordfish-Bacon Kebabs with Cilantro Gremolata

Ingredients
1 cup chopped cilantro
3 lemons, zested and juiced
1 tablespoon minced garlic
2 stalks lemongrass, white part only, finely minced
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
12 slices of bacon
1 pint cherry tomatoes
1 1/2 pounds center-cut swordfish, cut into 1x1-inch cubes
4-8 long satay skewers, soaked in water
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Cooking spray

Directions
Prepare a hot grill, sprayed slick.

In a bowl, combine the cilantro, lemon zest and juice, garlic, lemongrass and extra virgin olive oil. Season with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste.

Assemble the kebabs by first skewering one end of the bacon and following with swordfish cube.

Weave the bacon in between the swordfish and tomato as you thread each onto the skewer.

Lay the kebabs in a dish and take 1/3 of the gremolata and rub all over kebabs. Let marinate for at least 20 minutes.

Season the kebabs with salt and pepper and grill until bacon is cooked through, about 8 minutes.

Plate using a satay plate and serve with remaining gremolata in dipping bowl.

__________________________________________________________
chef ming tsai
Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming and chef/owner of Blue Ginger restaurant in Wellesley, Mass.

Anadama Bread By Annie Copps

Tuesday, August 3, 2010
1 Comments   1 comments.

daily dish banner

anadama breadThis is definitely a New England recipe. Anadama bread is one of the most popular breads here, and for good reason—it's absolutely delicious. Try smearing a mixture of butter and local honey on it and, you'll be hooked. This is my friend and mentor chef Jasper White's recipe, Jasper uses a bit more corn meal and less molasses than most recipes, so it serves dual roles as a breakfast bread or alongside hearty chowders.

Preparation Time: 30 minutes
Start to Finish Time: 1.5 hours
Yield: 2 loaves

Ingredients
1 package active dry yeast
1 tablespoon sugar
1-1/4 cups (approx.) warm water (105-115 degrees), divided
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted, cooled to room temperature
2 tablespoons dark molasses
2 teaspoons salt
3-1/2 cups bread flour, plus extra for work surface
1 cup yellow cornmeal
Vegetable oil or butter
1 large egg, beaten with 2 tablespoons water (egg wash)

Directions
In a medium-size bowl (or the bowl of a standing mixer with hook attachment), combine yeast, sugar, and 1/4 cup warm water; mix well. Add melted butter, molasses, salt, flour, and cornmeal. Slowly add up to 1 cup more warm water; mix to form a soft, but not sticky, dough. Add more water if necessary. Knead by machine about 10 minutes, or by hand about 15 minutes, until dough is smooth and elastic.

Oil (or butter) a large bowl lightly. Shape dough into a ball and place in the bowl; turn it once so it's lightly greased all over. Cover with plastic wrap or a damp cloth and place in a warm, draft-free spot. Let dough rise until volume doubles, about 1 hour.

Grease two 9-1/2x5-inch loaf pans. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Cut in half and shape each half into a loaf. Place each loaf in a pan, return to a warm spot, and let rise until volume doubles, about 20 to 30 minutes.

Heat your oven to 350 degrees. Brush the tops of the loaves with egg wash and bake 1 hour, or until deep golden brown. To test for doneness, remove one hot loaf from its pan and tap the bottom of the bread; you'll hear a hollow sound if it's done. If it's not done, return it to the oven for 5 to 10 minutes. When loaves are done, turn them out of their pans and cool on a rack for at least 20 minutes.

(Adapted from 50 Chowders: One-Pot Meals—Clam, Corn & Beyond by Jasper White)

Easy Breadsticks
By Annie Copps

Friday, August 6, 2010
0 Comments   0 comments.

daily dish banner



I love throwing dinner parties. I am always trying to think of fun and tasty snacks to have as appetizers: not too fancy or fussy, things you can pick up with your hands, and something I can make myself. I was recently at a cocktail party where breadsticks were served — store-bought — and they were okay, but I figured they can’t be too hard to make and I can add any flavors I like.

Ingredients
Pizza dough (homemade or store bought)

Any toppings you prefer. (we suggest black and white sesame seeds, fennel and coriander seeds, poppy seeds, chile powder, finely grated Parmesan cheese, za’atar spice mix, or freshly ground black pepper)

About 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
Coarse salt

Directions
Heat oven to 400 degrees.

Line 1 or 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Roll out your favorite pizza dough (store-bought or homemade) to about 1/3 inch thick.

Using a large knife or pizza cutter, cut the dough into 3/4-inch-wide strips.

Brush lightly with water and sprinkle with any mix of seeds, spices, and cheese. One by one lift the ends of the strip and twist. Arranged the twisted strips onto baking sheets.

Bake until nicely browned and crisp, about 15 minutes. Drizzle with extra virgin olive oil and sprinkle with coarse salt.

Let cool, then serve or store up to 1 day in an airtight container.

annie copps with appleAnnie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine's food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

Potato Puffballs By Annie Copps

Wednesday, October 27, 2010
0 Comments   0 comments.

daily dish banner

finished potato puffs

Potatoes are plentiful and I don't care what anyone from Idaho says… Maine potatoes are the best!

While working on our Yankee Magazine cookbook—The Best New England recipes, I came across this gem from 1937.

Boil 6 MAINE potatoes until tender. When they are cool enough to pick up, pass them through a ricer or food mill. Add some milk and parmesan cheese. Form them into ping pong sized balls and roll them in bread crumbs then bake 10 minutes. I dare you to eat just one of the browned and crisp wonders. Perfect on their own or next to a big, thick, juicy steak... either way, get yourself to some local Maine potatoes and try 'em.

Just try to eat one—we dare you.

Total time: 1 ½ hours (1 hour 15 minutes if pan-fried)
Prep time: 40 minutes

Yield: 6 dozen pieces

Ingredients
6 medium Russet potatoes (preferably Maine)
2 ½ tablespoons unsalted butter
1 cup hot whole milk
½ cup grated sharp cheese (or blue cheese)
Pinch kosher or sea salt
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
5 large eggs
4 cups unseasoned bread crumbs

Directions
Heat oven to 400 degrees.

Peel and cut potatoes into 2-inch chunks. Place in a pan with enough water to cover. Bring to a boil and cook until tender, about 20 minutes. Drain well. When cool enough to handle, but still hot, pass through a potato ricer or food mill into a medium bowl. By hand, stir in 1 cup hot milk and grated cheese. Season with salt and pepper. Be careful not to over mix.

Beat eggs and place in a shallow dish or pie pan. Place bread crumbs in shallow pie dish. Generously oil a rimmed baking sheet. Form potato mixture into golf ball-sized rounds. Roll each in the eggs, then bread crumbs. Working quickly place on baking sheet 1 inch apart from each other.

Bake 10 minutes and flip, until well-browned and crisped. Season with salt. Serve hot.

Asian Pistou Dumplings in Lime Broth By Ming Tsai

Friday, August 6, 2010
0 Comments   0 comments.

daily dish banner



Some of China’s smallest treasures are also its tastiest — dim sum — those savory little dumplings filled with meat, seafood, and vegetables. And they translate well to Western cuisine because they make great hors d’oeuvres. Today, however, we serve up a vegetarian soup version in my Asian Pistou Dumplings in Lime Broth. Let’s get cooking.

Yield: 10 dumplings

Ingredients
1 bunch scallions, sliced thinly, white and green separated
4 cups vegetarian broth
Juice of 2 limes
1 tablespoon Wanjashan low-sodium tamari
1/2 cup packed parsley
1/2 cup packed Thai basil
4 cloves garlic
1/2 cup edamame
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
10-12 thin wonton wrappers
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions
In a saucepot coated lightly with extra virgin olive oil, sweat the scallion whites and add broth. Reduce by 25%. Season and add lime juice and tamari. Meanwhile, using mortar and pestle, blend with a pinch of salt the parsley, basil, and garlic.

Fold in edamame and extra virgin olive oil and check for seasoning. Alternatively, using a food processor, pulse together salt, parsley, basil and garlic. Remove mixture to a bowl and fold in edamame and whisk in olive oil.

Make wontons with Asian pistou filling. Boil in broth and serve.

Garnish with scallions greens.

__________________________________________________________
Chef Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the country."

About the Author

RSS   RSS

Vehicle donation


Vehicle donation (June 2012) 89.7

Topics

 
You are on page 2 of 5   |