Potatoes

Shredded Potato Cake with Leeks and Cheese
By Annie Copps

Monday, August 9, 2010
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Who doesn't love a potato? Who doesn’t love cheese? So how about potatoes and cheese in a crispy pancake? I snagged this recipe for a Shredded Potato Cake with Leeks and Cheese from the good people of Shelburne Farms. Right on Lake Champlain in central Vermont, this special place is a working farm, cheese maker, inn, and great restaurant.

Ingredients
6 tablespoons olive oil, divided
2 small leeks, white and light-green parts only, cut in half lengthwise, thinly sliced
1-1/2 pounds russet or Yukon Gold potatoes
3/4 cup grated Alpine-style cheese (such as Gruyère)
Freshly ground black pepper
Kosher or sea salt

Directions
In a medium-size cast-iron frying pan, heat 2 tablespoons olive oil over medium-low heat. Add leeks and a big pinch of salt. Cook, stirring often, until leeks are silky and lightly browned, about 20 minutes. Remove to a plate. Wipe frying pan clean.

Rinse potatoes well, but don’t peel. Shred on a box grater. Place shredded potatoes on a clean dish towel and sprinkle with another generous pinch of salt and a few grinds of pepper. Toss potatoes with your hands to season. Gather towel corners together and twist (over a bowl or sink) to remove as much moisture as possible.

In the still-warm frying pan, heat 2 tablespoons olive oil over medium heat. Add half of the shredded potatoes in an even layer; press them into the pan. Add leeks and cheese in even layers. Add remaining potatoes, pressing them into the pan.

Cover the pan and cook until potatoes are golden brown on the bottom (peek with a spatula), 8 to 10 minutes. Turn a plate (larger than the pan) over on top of the potatoes. Place your hand firmly on top of the plate and carefully flip the pan so the potato cake is on the plate.

Heat remaining oil until shimmering. Slide potato cake back into pan, raw side down; cover, and cook 8 to 10 minutes. Slide from pan and let rest 3 to 5 minutes before serving.

Recipe adapted from Cooking with Shelburne Farms: Food and Stories from Vermont by Melissa Pasanen with Rick Gencarelli.

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Annie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine's food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

Creamy Parsnip and Potato Chowder With Parsnip Croutons By Annie Copps

Thursday, March 10, 2011
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Creamy Parsnip and Potato Chowder with Parsnip Croutons

I fully understand that it is potentially blasphemous for me, as a proud New Englander, to suggest chowder be made without seafood. But this really lovely recipe for a parsnip chowder—it does have potatoes—does that count?

Okay even though no clams or other seafood ar ein this recipe, but I really love this chowder—it is too thick and rich to be a soup. That richness comes from potatoes and parsnips and just a bit of cream, so all this deliciousness doesn't come with a health advisory!

Ingredients
1 1/2 pounds parsnips, peeled
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
3 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 small onion, coarsely chopped
1 celery stalk, coarsely chopped
1 small Russet potato, peeled and coarsely chopped
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme, plus 1 tablespoon for garnish
3/4 teaspoon ground coriander (optional)
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup dry white wine or dry white vermouth
6 cups chicken stock
1 cup light cream or whole milk, as needed
Fresh lemon juice Pinch sugar


Directions
Set aside 1 large or 2 small parsnips for the "croutons." Coarsely chop the remaining parsnips.

Heat the olive oil and 1 tablespoon of the butter in a soup pot or large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the onion and celery and sautê until tender and translucent, 8 to 10 minutes. Add the chopped parsnips, potato, thyme, coriander, and salt and pepper to taste. Sautê, stirring a few times, until heated through, about 5 minutes. Add the wine or vermouth, bring to a boil and reduce by half, about 4 minutes. Add the stock, cover partway, bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer. Continue to simmer until the parsnips and potatoes are tender enough to mash easily against the side of the pot with a large spoon, about 40 minutes.

Let the soup cool, uncovered, for at least 10 minutes (this makes it a little safer to blend). Filling a blender no more than two-thirds full, puree the soup in batches. Rinse out the soup pot and return the pureed soup to it. The soup may be made ahead up to this point and kept refrigerated (well-covered) for up to 2 days.

Meanwhile, make the parsnip “croutons:" cut the reserved parsnip(s) into 1/4-inch dice. Heat the remaining 3 tablespoons butter in a medium skillet over medium-high heat. When the butter stops foaming, add the diced parsnips. Season with salt and pepper and a large pinch of sugar. Sautê, stirring and shaking the pan often, until the parsnips are nicely browned. Transfer to paper towel to drain. Set aside until ready to serve. The croutons may also be made ahead and refrigerated in a single layer for up to 1 day.

To serve, gently reheat the soup, adding the cream or milk until you achieve the consistency you're after. Taste for salt and pepper. Just before serving, add a squeeze or fresh lemon juice (from about 1/2 lemon), to taste. Ladle into soup bowl, garnish with parsnip "croutons" and remaining fresh thyme.

(Courtesy: Yankee Magazine)

___________________________________________________________
annie coppsAnnie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine's food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

Smoky Rib-Eye Steaks with Loaded Mashed Potatoes

By Susie Middleton   |   Friday, May 4, 2012
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spicy red beans

All the ingredients in a loaded baked potato—bacon, scallions, cheese, and sour cream—are added to mashed potatoes in this hearty meal.

Serves four.

Ingredients.

2 lb. Yukon Gold potatoes, scrubbed and cut into 1-inch chunks
4 slices thick-cut bacon
2 boneless beef rib-eye steaks (about 2 lb. total)
1-1/2 tsp. sweet smoked paprika
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup whole milk
2 Tbs. unsalted butter
3 oz. grated sharp Cheddar (3/4 cup)
1/2 cup sour cream
2 medium scallions, thinly sliced

Directions:

Arrange a steamer basket in a large pot with 1 inch of water in the bottom. Spread the potatoes in the basket in an even layer, cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium low and steam until the potatoes are tender, about 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, cook the bacon in a large cast-iron skillet over medium heat, turning once, until crisp, 7 to 8 minutes total. Transfer the bacon to a paper-towel-lined plate; discard all but 1 Tbs. of the fat from the skillet.

Season the steaks all over with the paprika, 1-1/2 tsp. salt, and 1/2 tsp. pepper. Heat the skillet with the reserved bacon fat over medium-high heat. Arrange the steaks in the skillet in a single layer. Cook, flipping once, until deep golden-brown outside and medium rare inside, 10 to 12 minutes total. Transfer the steaks to a cutting board and let rest for 5 minutes.

Meanwhile, transfer the hot potatoes to a large bowl. Stir in the milk and butter and mash with a potato masher until just combined. Stir in the cheese, sour cream, scallions, and salt and pepper to taste.

Slice the steaks across the grain and transfer to dinner plates. Serve the potatoes on the side with the bacon crumbled on top.

Serving suggestions

Serve with a salad or Quick-Sautéed Collard Ribbons.

Nutrition information (per serving):

Calories (kcal): 870; Fat (g): 52; Fat Calories (kcal): 470; Saturated Fat (g): 25; Protein (g): 59; Monounsaturated Fat (g): 19; Carbohydrates (g): 41; Polyunsaturated Fat (g): 2; Sodium (mg): 910; Cholesterol (mg): 170; Fiber (g): 4;

 

Susie Middleton is editor at large for Fine Cooking magazine.

Corned Beef And Cabbage By Annie Copps

Monday, March 14, 2011
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corned beef and cabbage plated

Sure it's a Saint Patrick's Day tradition, but why wait for the beer to turn green to have corned beef and cabbage? And have I got a great recipe for you.

You can buy a piece of beef at the market which has been corned for you, but have looksee at the label—if you can pronounce all the ingredients without sounding like Colin Firth in The Kings Speech, I'll wash your car. Fear not, all "corning" is, is a week long salt and herb spice for beef.

Combine water, salt, sugar, coriander and mustard seeds, peppercorns, bay leaves, thyme, red pepper flakes, and garlic—then submerge a 6 pound beef brisket for refrigerate it for a week. Then simmer it with some onions and carrots for a few hours and you, my friends, have yourself a delicious homemade corned beef.

To accompany it, instead of boiled cabbage, how about a platter of roasted vegetables—such as cabbage, of course, carrots, turnips, potatoes, and beets. Oh and I am not very good at washing cars, you should see my own.

Yield: 10 servings

For the brine
1 gallon water
11/2 cups kosher salt
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon coriander seeds, crushed
1 tablespoon mustard seeds
1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
4 dried bay leaves, crushed
8 stems thyme
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
8 cloves garlic, crushed
5 to 6 pound "flat cut" beef brisket

In a large pot, stir together salt and water until salt dissolves. Stir in sugar, coriander, mustard, peppercorns, bay leaves, thyme, pepper flakes, and garlic. Add beef and submerge. Place a small plate on top of the beef to keep it underwater.

Cover pot and refrigerate 7 days.

For the corned beef
1 medium onion, halved
1 medium celery stalk, halved
1 medium carrot, peeled, halved
1 medium head cabbage, cut into 8 wedges, core intact so leaves don't fall off
1 pound baby carrots
3 or 4 turnips, peeled and quartered
½ pound Brussels sprouts, trimmed and cut in half
1 pound small red potatoes, quartered
About ¼ cup olive oil
kosher or sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
Dijon mustard, for serving

Directions
Rinse brisket; discard brine. Place in a large pot. Add enough water to cover by 2 inches. Add onion, celery, and halved carrot, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer until very tender, 3 to 3 1/2 hours.

Transfer corned beef to a cutting board. Tent with foil, and let rest for 30 minutes.

Heat oven to 400 degrees.
v Discard remaining solids from broth and strain. Discard all but ½ cup of broth.

In a large bowl, add cabbage and drizzle with olive oil to lightly coat.

Arrange in a single layer on a foil-lined baking sheet and place in oven. Add carrots and potatoes to the bowl, drizzle with oil and season with salt and pepper.

Arrange in a single layer on a foil-lined baking sheet and place in oven. Add Brussels sprouts to the bowl, drizzle with oil and season with salt and pepper.

Arrange in a single layer on a foil-lined baking sheet and place in oven. Add potatoes to the bowl, drizzle with oil and season with salt and pepper.

Arrange in a single layer on a foil-lined baking sheet and place in oven.

Turn vegetables every 15 minutes or so until well-browned.

Remove to a platter once they are cooked and tent with foil.

Trim excess fat from beef. Slice thinly against grain, and transfer to platter. Serve with broth and mustard.

(Courtesy: Yankee Magazine)

___________________________________________________________
annie coppsAnnie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine's food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

Creamy Parsnip and Potato Chowder with Parsnip Croutons By Annie Copps

Thursday, March 3, 2011
1 Comments   1 comments.

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Creamy Parsnip and Potato Chowder with Parsnip Croutons

I fully understand that it is potentially blasphemous for me, as a proud New Englander, to suggest chowder be made without seafood. But this realllllly lovely recipe for a parsnip chowder—it does have potatoes—does that count?

Okay even though no clams or other seafood ar ein this recipe, but I really love this chowder—it is too thick and rich to be a soup. That richness comes from potatoes and parsnips and just a bit of cream, so all this deliciousness doesn't come with a health advisory!

Ingredients
1 1/2 pounds parsnips, peeled
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
3 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 small onion, coarsely chopped
1 celery stalk, coarsely chopped
1 small Russet potato, peeled and coarsely chopped
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme, plus 1 tablespoon for garnish
3/4 teaspoon ground coriander (optional)
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup dry white wine or dry white vermouth
6 cups chicken stock
1 cup light cream or whole milk, as needed
Fresh lemon juice Pinch sugar

Directions
Set aside 1 large or 2 small parsnips for the "croutons." Coarsely chop the remaining parsnips.

Heat the olive oil and 1 tablespoon of the butter in a soup pot or large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the onion and celery and sautê until tender and translucent, 8 to 10 minutes. Add the chopped parsnips, potato, thyme, coriander, and salt and pepper to taste. Sautê, stirring a few times, until heated through, about 5 minutes. Add the wine or vermouth, bring to a boil and reduce by half, about 4 minutes. Add the stock, cover partway, bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer. Continue to simmer until the parsnips and potatoes are tender enough to mash easily against the side of the pot with a large spoon, about 40 minutes.

Let the soup cool, uncovered, for at least 10 minutes (this makes it a little safer to blend). Filling a blender no more than two-thirds full, puree the soup in batches. Rinse out the soup pot and return the pureed soup to it. The soup may be made ahead up to this point and kept refrigerated (well-covered) for up to 2 days.

Meanwhile, make the parsnip “croutons:" cut the reserved parsnip(s) into 1/4-inch dice. Heat the remaining 3 tablespoons butter in a medium skillet over medium-high heat. When the butter stops foaming, add the diced parsnips. Season with salt and pepper and a large pinch of sugar. Sautê, stirring and shaking the pan often, until the parsnips are nicely browned. Transfer to paper towel to drain. Set aside until ready to serve. The croutons may also be made ahead and refrigerated in a single layer for up to 1 day.

To serve, gently reheat the soup, adding the cream or milk until you achieve the consistency you're after. Taste for salt and pepper. Just before serving, add a squeeze or fresh lemon juice (from about 1/2 lemon), to taste. Ladle into soup bowl, garnish with parsnip "croutons" and remaining fresh thyme.

(Courtesy: Yankee Magazine)

___________________________________________________________

annie coppsAnnie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine's food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

About the Author
Susie Middleton Susie Middleton
Susie Middleton is editor at large for Fine Cooking magazine and the author of veggie cookbooks Fast, Fresh & Green and The Fresh & Green Table.

Follow her on Twitter at @sixburnersue

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