Eggs

Corn and Tomato Tart
By Annie Copps

Friday, August 6, 2010
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I watch the fields grow all summer long, waiting for the first opportunity to get my hands on a couple ears of fresh corn. And what goes better with corn than its farm field cousin, tomatoes? One of the best places to get corn has to be Verrill Farm in Concord, MA and this corn and tomato tart recipe is their idea.

Total time: 60 minutes; active time: 30 minutes

Yield: 8 to 12 servings

Filling ingredients
3 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 cup chopped onion
1 clove garlic, chopped
5 ears corn, kernels cut off
kosher or sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
1/4 cup grated cheddar cheese
½ pint cherry tomatoes, cut in half
3 scallions, chopped
2 large eggs
1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup heavy cream
Baked pie crust (see recipe below)

Directions
Heat oven to 375°

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, sauté onions and garlic in olive oil until onions are translucent, 3 to 5 minutes. Add corn and cook about 8 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Put half of corn mixture in pre-baked pie crust. Layer cheese evenly on top. Add remaining corn mixture. Scatter cherry tomatoes and scallions on top.

In a small bowl, whisk eggs, milk, and cream; pour egg mixture over tart.

Bake 30 minutes until tart is golden brown.

Piecrust recipe
This recipe is for a 9-by-10-inch pie pan (a tart pan may also be used)

Ingredients
3/4 cups flour
6 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons cold water

Directions
Heat oven to 375 degrees.

In a food processor, pulse together flour, butter, and salt until mixture resembles corn kernels.

Add water and pulse just until the mixture forms a ball. Roll out dough and place in pie pan. Cover with parchment paper and a handful of dried beans or pie weights.

Bake 15 minutes. Let crust cool and add filling.

___________________________________________________________
Annie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine's food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

My Mom's Meatloaf
By Annie Copps

Monday, January 24, 2011
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meatloaf

For some people, meatloaf is the food they ate when there was nothing left in the house. For me, the meatloaf was so good, I had to beg my mother to make it. My Mom, also a terrific cook, had a "thing" about meatloaf, I think she thinks of it as a little de classe. Occasionally she would succumb, but she couldn’t understand why we liked it so much. Now she confesses to making and enjoying it—no wonder, wait until you try this recipe, it is more dense than most meatloaves and it tastes great the next day in a sandwich with sautéed onions and ketchup.

Preparation Time: 30 minutes
Start to Finish Time: 90 minutes
Yield: about 9 pieces

Ingredients
3 slices white bread, crust removed
1 cup milk
1 pound ground beef
1/2 pound ground pork
1/2 pound raw chorizo sausage, casing removed
1 cup finely chopped onion
3 large eggs, lightly beaten
1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt (approximately)
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
1 tablespoon dried sage
2 teaspoons dried thyme
2 teaspoons dried rosemary
1 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 cup ketchup
3 bacon strips, uncooked

Directions
Heat oven to 350 degrees. Place bread in a small bowl. Pour milk over it and let the bread soak up as much liquid as it will hold.

In a large bowl, knead together beef, pork, and chorizo. Add bread, any milk left in the bowl, onion, eggs, salt, herbs, nutmeg, and ketchup. With super-clean hands, knead until ingredients are uniformly distributed.

Line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil. On the lined sheet, mold the meat into a loaf shape, about 9 inches long. Lay bacon strips lengthwise on top. Bake 1 hour. Remove and let rest 20 minutes on a cooling rack. Transfer to a cutting board; slice and serve.

(Courtesy: Yankee Magazine)

___________________________________________________________
annie coppsAnnie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine's food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

Marmalade Tart By Annie Copps

Friday, August 6, 2010
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I confess that I am not such a good baker but I am trying! My good friend, food writer, and cookbook author Molly Stevens is a great cook and she shared a super easy recipe that works anytime of the year. So Molly’s marmalade tart has a tender and crunchy pastry that has extra texture flavor from just a few tablespoons of cornmeal. In a food processor you simply pulse together flour, cornmeal, sugar, salt, and butter—plus an egg yolk. That’s your pastry.

Preparation Time: 25 minutes
Start to Finish Time: 2 hours
Yield: one 8-inch tart

Grating a bit of the pastry onto the top of the tart before baking will add a nice crunch. Award-winning cookbook author Molly Stevens shared this recipe with Yankee Magazine.

Dough ingredients
1-1/4 cups all-purpose flour, plus extra for dusting surfaces
2 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons yellow cornmeal, preferably stone-ground
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
6 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces and chilled
1 large egg yolk
2 to 3 tablespoons cold milk, cream, or water

Dough directions
In the bowl of a food processor, combine flour, sugar, cornmeal, and salt. Pulse to combine. Add butter, tossing with a wooden spoon to coat the butter cubes in flour, then pulse several times until the mixture resembles coarse oatmeal. Add egg yolk and 2 tablespoons milk, cream, or water, then pulse until the dough begins to come together in a ball. Add the additional tablespoon of liquid if it’s needed to bring the dough together. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface and knead it briefly, then shape it into a disk about 5 inches across. Wrap in plastic and refrigerate at least 1 hour or overnight.

Using a lightly floured rolling pin, roll the dough into a shape about 1/2 inch wider than the tart pan you are using. Transfer the dough to the pan (loosely fold the dough in half so it doesn’t sag) and line the pan with it, being careful not to stretch the dough. Trim any excess dough from the rim of the pan, leaving a blunt, neat edge. Gather the trimmings into a ball (it should be about the size of a table tennis ball). Wrap the tart and the small ball of dough in plastic and refrigerate 1 hour or up to 2 days.

Filling ingredients
1 heaping cup of your favorite marmalade or jam
1/3 cup sliced almonds
Confectioners’ sugar, for dusting

Filling directions
Preheat the oven to 375°. Remove the tart pan from the refrigerator and spread marmalade evenly over the crust. Grate the chilled ball of pastry onto the marmalade, then sprinkle almonds over the top. Bake on a rack in the center of the oven until the pastry is golden, the filling is bubbly, and the almonds are toasted, about 40 to 50 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack to cool. When the tart is completely cool, dust with confectioners’ sugar. Serve at room temperature.

___________________________________________________________
annie coppsAnnie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine's food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

Anadama Bread By Annie Copps

Tuesday, August 3, 2010
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anadama breadThis is definitely a New England recipe. Anadama bread is one of the most popular breads here, and for good reason—it's absolutely delicious. Try smearing a mixture of butter and local honey on it and, you'll be hooked. This is my friend and mentor chef Jasper White's recipe, Jasper uses a bit more corn meal and less molasses than most recipes, so it serves dual roles as a breakfast bread or alongside hearty chowders.

Preparation Time: 30 minutes
Start to Finish Time: 1.5 hours
Yield: 2 loaves

Ingredients
1 package active dry yeast
1 tablespoon sugar
1-1/4 cups (approx.) warm water (105-115 degrees), divided
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted, cooled to room temperature
2 tablespoons dark molasses
2 teaspoons salt
3-1/2 cups bread flour, plus extra for work surface
1 cup yellow cornmeal
Vegetable oil or butter
1 large egg, beaten with 2 tablespoons water (egg wash)

Directions
In a medium-size bowl (or the bowl of a standing mixer with hook attachment), combine yeast, sugar, and 1/4 cup warm water; mix well. Add melted butter, molasses, salt, flour, and cornmeal. Slowly add up to 1 cup more warm water; mix to form a soft, but not sticky, dough. Add more water if necessary. Knead by machine about 10 minutes, or by hand about 15 minutes, until dough is smooth and elastic.

Oil (or butter) a large bowl lightly. Shape dough into a ball and place in the bowl; turn it once so it's lightly greased all over. Cover with plastic wrap or a damp cloth and place in a warm, draft-free spot. Let dough rise until volume doubles, about 1 hour.

Grease two 9-1/2x5-inch loaf pans. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Cut in half and shape each half into a loaf. Place each loaf in a pan, return to a warm spot, and let rise until volume doubles, about 20 to 30 minutes.

Heat your oven to 350 degrees. Brush the tops of the loaves with egg wash and bake 1 hour, or until deep golden brown. To test for doneness, remove one hot loaf from its pan and tap the bottom of the bread; you'll hear a hollow sound if it's done. If it's not done, return it to the oven for 5 to 10 minutes. When loaves are done, turn them out of their pans and cool on a rack for at least 20 minutes.

(Adapted from 50 Chowders: One-Pot Meals—Clam, Corn & Beyond by Jasper White)

Potato Puffballs By Annie Copps

Wednesday, October 27, 2010
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finished potato puffs

Potatoes are plentiful and I don't care what anyone from Idaho says… Maine potatoes are the best!

While working on our Yankee Magazine cookbook—The Best New England recipes, I came across this gem from 1937.

Boil 6 MAINE potatoes until tender. When they are cool enough to pick up, pass them through a ricer or food mill. Add some milk and parmesan cheese. Form them into ping pong sized balls and roll them in bread crumbs then bake 10 minutes. I dare you to eat just one of the browned and crisp wonders. Perfect on their own or next to a big, thick, juicy steak... either way, get yourself to some local Maine potatoes and try 'em.

Just try to eat one—we dare you.

Total time: 1 ½ hours (1 hour 15 minutes if pan-fried)
Prep time: 40 minutes

Yield: 6 dozen pieces

Ingredients
6 medium Russet potatoes (preferably Maine)
2 ½ tablespoons unsalted butter
1 cup hot whole milk
½ cup grated sharp cheese (or blue cheese)
Pinch kosher or sea salt
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
5 large eggs
4 cups unseasoned bread crumbs

Directions
Heat oven to 400 degrees.

Peel and cut potatoes into 2-inch chunks. Place in a pan with enough water to cover. Bring to a boil and cook until tender, about 20 minutes. Drain well. When cool enough to handle, but still hot, pass through a potato ricer or food mill into a medium bowl. By hand, stir in 1 cup hot milk and grated cheese. Season with salt and pepper. Be careful not to over mix.

Beat eggs and place in a shallow dish or pie pan. Place bread crumbs in shallow pie dish. Generously oil a rimmed baking sheet. Form potato mixture into golf ball-sized rounds. Roll each in the eggs, then bread crumbs. Working quickly place on baking sheet 1 inch apart from each other.

Bake 10 minutes and flip, until well-browned and crisped. Season with salt. Serve hot.

Lemongrass Cheesecake By Ming Tsai

Wednesday, December 22, 2010
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lemongrass cheesecake

If you were to tell me that you don't like cheesecake, well, I'd have to call you a liar. Why? Well, how can anyone not be a fan of this creamy, indulgent dessert?

Ingredients
20 shortbread cookies, like Lorna Doone
2 tablespoons melted butter
2 pounds cream cheese
pinch of kosher salt
10 ounces sugar
4 stalks lemongrass, white parts only, minced
4 extra large eggs
Juice of 2 lemons
5 ounces cream

Directions
Preheat oven to 325 degrees convection.

In a bowl, combine crushed shortbread cookies and melted butter. Press cookie mixture into bottom and sides of 8-inch cake pan; a springform pan is recommended.

Bake in middle of oven for about 10 minutes. Remove to a rack and let cool.

Turn oven down to 300 degrees. In a stand mixer, cream together cream cheese, salt, sugar and lemongrass. Add eggs one at a time, alternating with the lemon juice, allowing each egg to be fully incorporated into the mixture before adding the next, scraping the bowl constantly.

Add cream. Spoon mixture into baked crust and place in a water bath. (You'll need to foil the edges of your springform pan to prevent leakage.)

Bake cheesecake in middle of oven for about 60 minutes, until edges become browned and cake is set in the center.

Remove from water bath, remove foil and place on a rack to let cool, then refrigerate until chilled and serve.

__________________________________________________________
chef ming tsaiMing Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming and chef/owner of Blue Ginger restaurant in Wellesley, Mass.

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