Wine

Chicken Fusilli with Edamames and Shiitakes
By Ming Tsai

Tuesday, December 7, 2010
1 Comments   1 comments.

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Chicken Fusilli with Edamames and Shiitakes

This dish combines the wonderful and healthy flavors of edamames and shiitakes with chicken and fusilli pasta to make a delicious good-for-you dinner.

Ingredients
8 naturally raised chicken thighs, skin-on
v 2 onions, sliced
5 cloves of garlic, sliced
2 cups sliced shiitakes
4 stalks celery, 1/4-inch dice
2 cups peeled edamames
1 cup red wine
2 cups chicken stock
2 tablespoons naturally brewed soy sauce
1/2 pound cooked fusilli pasta
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Extra virgin olive oil to cook

Directions
Have a cast-iron skillet over medium heat. Season the thighs and sear in hot pan until both sides are nicely colored. Remove chicken thighs to a plate. Pour off 50% of the chicken fat and add 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil. Saute onions and garlic for 1 minute.

Add shiitakes, then celery and edamames. Deglaze with wine, reduce by 25%, add stock and naturally brewed soy sauce, check for flavor.

Add back chicken thighs and cook through, another 15-20 minutes.

Add pasta to heat through and drizzle with extra virgin olive oil before serving.

Serve in pasta bowls.

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chef ming tsaiMing Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming and chef/owner of Blue Ginger restaurant in Wellesley, Mass.

Braised Leeks
By Annie Copps

Wednesday, October 27, 2010
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lightly braised leeks in a dish

Braising is an easy way to soften up and draw a lot of flavor out of an ingredient. Usually we think of tough cuts of meat such as shoulders or shanks for braising, but how about some vegetables?

I am drawn to leeks, their mellow onion flavor is seductive and slow cooking them through braising coaxes out all the sweet beauty. This recipe goes well with roasted meats or a pasta dish.

Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients
12 medium leeks, trimmed and rinsed well
2 cups low-sodium chicken stock
1 cup white wine
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
Kosher or sea salt
Freshly ground white pepper
1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese
1/2 cup panko breadcrumb

Directions
Clean the leeks well, like all vegetables, they grow in soil, but leeks just don’t like to let go of their dirty beds. And one small grain of dirt will feel like a boulder in your mouth if you don’t get rid of it. Discard roots and all but 2 inches of the green part; then arrange the leeks in a single layer. Dot with some butter, add some chicken stock and cover tightly with foil. Add some parmesan and bread crumbs at the end.

Heat oven to 400°.

In a medium-size casserole, arrange leeks in one layer. Pour stock and wine over top. Scatter pats of butter over the leeks and season with salt and pepper.

Seal with foil and bake 30 minutes. Remove foil. Return to oven for 10 minutes longer.

In a small bowl, combine parmesan and breadcrumbs. Scatter over top of leeks and bake 5 to 8 minutes, or until well-browned.

Cranberry Red Roast Braised Pork Shoulder
By Ming Tsai

Thursday, August 12, 2010
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Ingredients
2 cups naturally brewed soy sauce
2 cups red wine
2 cups water, plus more if necessary
1 small ginger root, sliced into 5 thick slices
2 bunch scallions, 1 inch pieces
3 star anise
1 packed cup of brown sugar
1 cup fresh cranberries, plus 1/2 cup for garnish, halved
1 bone-out pork shoulder, fat cap on, scored diagonally
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Chinese steamed bread (you can buy these frozen in Chinatown)

Directions
In a stock pot over high heat, combine all liquids, ginger, scallions, star anise, sugar and cranberries and stir to combine. Bring to a simmer and add pork. Cook 4 hours until pork is fork tender, skimming periodically. When ready, using a spider, remove pork and transfer to large oval platter. Remove star anise and ginger and discard.

Reduce sauce by 25% and check for seasoning. Add remaining cranberries and heat for 5 minutes with steamer on top of stockpot to heat the white Chinese steam bread. Ladle sauce on pork, serve with steamed bread. To eat, slice pork and stuff inside steamed bread with a spoonful of the red roast sauce.

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Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the country.

Sauteed Fiddlehead Ferns
By Annie Copps

Tuesday, August 10, 2010
1 Comments   1 comments.

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This time of year is a transitional one for local ingredients, so we turned to Josh Ziskin, chef and owner of the Italian-inspired La Morra restaurant in Brookline. The end of winter through spring can be a challenging time to write a menu, so he sticks closely to what is locally available — and right now, that means fiddlehead ferns.

Total time: 30 minutes
Active time: 20 minutes

Ingredients
1 pound fiddlehead ferns, well rinsed and trimmed
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
4 shallots, thinly sliced
4 cloves garlic, minced
¼ cup white wine (optional)
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme (or the fresh herb of your choice: rosemary, basil, or oregano)
2 tablespoon unsalted butter
Kosher or sea salt

Directions
Bring a large sauce pot of generously salted water to boil. Blanch fiddleheads for 4 minutes; remove to ice water for 1 minute. Strain from water and dry well.

In a large saute pan over medium-high add oil and cook shallots and garlic until shallots are translucent. Add fiddleheads and saute for 2 minutes. Add wine (if using) and reduce until about 1 tablespoon of liquid remains. Add about 2 tablespoons of water and generously season with salt and pepper. Add thyme and butter and stir well.

Recipe courtesy of Josh Ziskin of La Morra.
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annie coppsAnnie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine's food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

Thai Curried Clams and Chorizo
By Ming Tsai

Monday, August 9, 2010
0 Comments   0 comments.

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Not only do I look to the East and the West for sources of inspiration, I also look to the past for great ingredients about which we may have forgotten…like buttermilk, which used to be a staple in American kitchens. It’s not only a lighter alternative to cream, but also to Asian coconut milk, as I’ll show you today with my Thai Curried Clams and Chorizo. It’s a great one-pot-meal that features a clams and sausage combo that’s well-loved in both the East and West.

Serves 4

Ingredients
1 1/2 cups 1/4-inch-dice chorizo or 1/4 pound ground sausage
2 large leeks, white part julienned
2 pounds cockles or small littleneck clams, purged overnight in water/cornmeal/pinch of salt solution
3 tablespoons red Thai curry paste
1 cup white wine
1/2 cup buttermilk
Juice of 2 limes
2 cups cooked orzo
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Canola oil

Directions
In a stock pot coated lightly with oil over medium-high heat, add chorizo, leeks, cockles (discard any open cockles), and curry paste, and sauté about 2 minutes, then season. Deglaze with wine and cover; cook for 6-8 minutes. Add buttermilk, lime juice, and orzo, stir to combine and check for seasoning. Serve, discarding any unopened cockles.

Drink recommendation
Chateau Villa Bel-Air Blanc, Bordeaux, France

Taste: Rich and complex with white fruit and caramel flavors.
Aroma: Honey mixed with smoky notes
60% Sauvignon Blanc, 40% Semillon

__________________________________________________________
Chef Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the nation.

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