Wine

Taste of WGBH: 100 Years of Holiday Food and Drink

Wednesday, November 30, 2011
0 Comments   0 comments.


Wines Of Argentina

Tuesday, October 4, 2011
0 Comments   0 comments.


Sake-Black Pepper Mussels With Granny Smith Apples
By Ming Tsai

Wednesday, November 10, 2010
0 Comments   0 comments.

daily dish banner

Sake-Black Pepper Mussels With Granny Smith Apples

Apples may seem like a funny match for mussels, but believe-you-me the tartness and sweetness of apples play beautifully against the natural brininess of the mussels and a little bit of sake adds yet another element that makes this dish delicious.

Ingredients
1 tablespoon minced garlic
3 large shallots, sliced
1 tablespoon coarsely ground black pepper
2 pounds PEI mussels, scrubbed, bearded
1 cup sake
1/4 cup ponzu
1 large green apple, peeled, julienned
2 tablespoons butter
Togarashi for garnish
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Canola oil for cooking

Directions
In a wok over high heat coated lightly with oil, stir-fry garlic, shallots, and black pepper; add mussels and season. Deglaze with sake and cover to open mussels.

When mussels are starting to open, add ponzu, green apple and butter.

Cover for about 30 seconds to allow flavors to meld.

Serve in a large bowl and garnish with togarashi.

Grilled Marinated Flank Steak By Annie Copps

Monday, December 13, 2010
1 Comments   1 comments.

daily dish banner

shrimp dumplings

If you are a coupon clipper or circular reader, flank steak goes on sale quite often. It's a little tougher than some cuts, but we love the flavor and its forgiving nature when it comes to rare or well-done.

We keep our grill going all year, but you can use your broiler indoors to whip up this fast and flavorful steak dish.

Into a large zip-top bag, place a 2-pound flank steak, some red wine, a chopped onion, a few cloves of garlic, a few sprigs of thyme and a bit of sugar. Mix well to coat the steak and pop in the fridge for a few hours—you can do this before you head out to work in the morning or up to 3 days. Sometimes I buy this on sale, mix it in the bag, label and freeze for a few weeks. But if you are ready to cook it now, fire up the grill or broiler and cook the steak 3 to 4 minutes per side. Let it rest, then you are ready to slice into a flavorful steak.

Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients
1 2-pound flank or skirt steak, trimmed
1/2 cup dry white or red wine
1/2 red or yellow onion, sliced
4 to 5 sprigs fresh thyme
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 to 3 cloves garlic, roughly chopped
1 tablespoon sugar
Kosher or sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions
Place all ingredients through sugar in a large zip-top plastic bag. Toss to coat well. Refrigerate two hours or up to 3 days if you prefer.

Prepare grill or broiler to medium-high. Remove steak from marinade and shake off excess. Place on grill or under broiler about 4 minutes per side (for medium rare). Remove from heat and season with salt and pepper. Let rest 5 minutes before slicing.

Soy-Braised Short Ribs
By Ming Tsai

Monday, August 9, 2010
0 Comments   0 comments.

daily dish banner



Who doesn't loooove ribs? Today east meets west — and goes south — with my Soy-Braised Short Ribs, a hearty main dish that is a great one-pot meal you can make either in your slow cooker or on your stovetop. I guarantee these ribs will be fall-off-the-bone delicious and will wow your barbecue guests with the flavor of kechap manis.

Serves 4

Ingredients
6 2×3 short ribs (about 4x3x2)
2 tablespoons coarse ground black pepper
Coarse ground sea salt
1 cup all-purpose flour
3 large carrots, peeled, roll cut
4 stalks celery, roll cut
2 yellow onions, 1 inch dice
5 slices of ginger
2 cups red wine
1 cup kechap manis
Water to cover
Rehydrated rice stick noodles, to serve
Canola oil to cook
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Directions
Place a stovetop-safe slow cooker insert over medium-high heat, coated lightly with oil. In a pie plate, combine pepper and flour. Season ribs well and coat with flour. Place short ribs in oil and sear until browned on both sides, about 12-15 minutes. Remove short ribs to a plate and wipe out pan. Add just enough oil to lightly coat and add carrots, celery, onions, and ginger. Season with salt and pepper and sweat until just softened. Deglaze with wine and allow to reduce by 25%. Add kechap manis and short ribs and pour in just enough water to almost cover. Check for flavor and season if necessary. Cook on high setting in slow cooker for 4-5 hours. Serve hot with rice stick noodles.

Ming’s wine suggestion
2004 Kangarilla Road McLaren Vale Shiraz, McLaren Vale, Australia

Flavor: Spicy, dark berry with nuances of dark plum
Aroma: Deeply aromatic, with notes of mulberry followed by black and red berry fruits
Finish: Soft tannins

—Aged in French and American oak
—Made up of grapes from 3 separate locations, each yielding slightly different aromas and flavor profiles, resulting in a complex, multifaceted wine. This is a great match with the Soy-Braised Short Ribs.


________________________________________________________________
ming tsai thumbnail holding lime
Chef Ming Tsai is the host and executive producer of public television series Simply Ming. Each week, Simply Ming brings mouthwatering recipes inspired by the combination of East and West into homes across the nation.

Creamy Parsnip and Potato Chowder With Parsnip Croutons By Annie Copps

Thursday, March 10, 2011
0 Comments   0 comments.

daily dish banner

Creamy Parsnip and Potato Chowder with Parsnip Croutons

I fully understand that it is potentially blasphemous for me, as a proud New Englander, to suggest chowder be made without seafood. But this really lovely recipe for a parsnip chowder—it does have potatoes—does that count?

Okay even though no clams or other seafood ar ein this recipe, but I really love this chowder—it is too thick and rich to be a soup. That richness comes from potatoes and parsnips and just a bit of cream, so all this deliciousness doesn't come with a health advisory!

Ingredients
1 1/2 pounds parsnips, peeled
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
3 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 small onion, coarsely chopped
1 celery stalk, coarsely chopped
1 small Russet potato, peeled and coarsely chopped
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme, plus 1 tablespoon for garnish
3/4 teaspoon ground coriander (optional)
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup dry white wine or dry white vermouth
6 cups chicken stock
1 cup light cream or whole milk, as needed
Fresh lemon juice Pinch sugar


Directions
Set aside 1 large or 2 small parsnips for the "croutons." Coarsely chop the remaining parsnips.

Heat the olive oil and 1 tablespoon of the butter in a soup pot or large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the onion and celery and sautê until tender and translucent, 8 to 10 minutes. Add the chopped parsnips, potato, thyme, coriander, and salt and pepper to taste. Sautê, stirring a few times, until heated through, about 5 minutes. Add the wine or vermouth, bring to a boil and reduce by half, about 4 minutes. Add the stock, cover partway, bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer. Continue to simmer until the parsnips and potatoes are tender enough to mash easily against the side of the pot with a large spoon, about 40 minutes.

Let the soup cool, uncovered, for at least 10 minutes (this makes it a little safer to blend). Filling a blender no more than two-thirds full, puree the soup in batches. Rinse out the soup pot and return the pureed soup to it. The soup may be made ahead up to this point and kept refrigerated (well-covered) for up to 2 days.

Meanwhile, make the parsnip “croutons:" cut the reserved parsnip(s) into 1/4-inch dice. Heat the remaining 3 tablespoons butter in a medium skillet over medium-high heat. When the butter stops foaming, add the diced parsnips. Season with salt and pepper and a large pinch of sugar. Sautê, stirring and shaking the pan often, until the parsnips are nicely browned. Transfer to paper towel to drain. Set aside until ready to serve. The croutons may also be made ahead and refrigerated in a single layer for up to 1 day.

To serve, gently reheat the soup, adding the cream or milk until you achieve the consistency you're after. Taste for salt and pepper. Just before serving, add a squeeze or fresh lemon juice (from about 1/2 lemon), to taste. Ladle into soup bowl, garnish with parsnip "croutons" and remaining fresh thyme.

(Courtesy: Yankee Magazine)

___________________________________________________________
annie coppsAnnie B. Copps is a senior editor at Yankee Magazine. Annie oversees the magazine's food coverage, both as an editor and as a contributor of feature stories and columns.

About the Author

RSS   RSS

To You It's general-donate-adlob


Vehicle donation (June 2012) 89.7

Topics

 
You are on page 1 of 6   |