Classical Music with Laura Carlo

Mr. President: A Choral Tribute

By Brian McCreath   |   Sunday, February 20, 2011
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Feb. 25

Earlier this week, on Presidents Day, we offered a new set of choral pieces that pay tribute to several US Presidents through the words they spoke or wrote.  They were from a project dreamed up by Judith Clurman, conductor of Essential Voices USA, who was inspired to commission the series as a result of her commitment to music, to politics, and to education.

As we talked through this project here at 99.5 All Classical, I couldn't help but be struck by the dichotomy of the character of these pieces and the character of our current political climate.  The words Clurman found and the music they inspired are reminders that, in the midst of bitter political battles playing out in Washington, D.C, Madison, Wisconsin, Indianapolis, Indiana, and many other places around the country, there are and have been extraordinary people who have approached politics as a way to improve lives and create a better society.

I was also reminded of a few amazing resources about specific presidents that I've found valuable in making their impact and legacy more tangible.  I've listed them below, along with five of the pieces that you can listen to on demand.  See what you think, and feel free to add your own comments and suggestions for learning more about presidents.

And to hear all 16 of the pieces included in the project, on demand, along with interviews with Clurman and several of the composers, visit NPR Music's Deceptive Cadence.


George Washington - “I had rather be on my farm than be emperor of the world.”
1st President: 1789-1797
Washington Round, by Michael Gilberston




John Adams - “I pray heaven to bestow the best of blessings on this house and all that shall hereafter inhabit it. May none but the wise men ever rule under this roof.”
2nd President: 1797–1801
John Adams’ Prayer, by Jake Heggie



John Adams, David McCullough's Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of Massachusetts's own John Adams, an incredible work in its own right, inspired HBO to create an equally incredible television biography of this vastly underrated president.  The series not only includes vivid portrayals of Adams and his wife Abigail by, respectively, Paul Giamatti and Laura Linney, it also gives you a sometimes difficult to watch picture of life in colonial America.  For more info, visit HBO's John Adams.


Abraham Lincoln - “The ballot is stronger than the bullet.”
16th President: 1861-1865
The ballet is stronger than the bullet, by Jason Robert Brown



Garry Wills's 1992 book, Lincoln at Gettysburg:  The Words That Remade America, is invaluable in many ways.  The 272-word Gettysburg Address is so ubiquitous as an item of history that it may occasionally lose its power, but this illuminating book reinforces the staggering work of genius the speech is by weaving in philosophy, history, and cultural practices of the time.  The number of words written about Lincoln over the decades is practically infinite, but for me, this one book is all that's needed to confirm him as our greatest president.


Dwight David Eisenhower - “History does not long entrust the care of freedom to the weak or the timid.”
33rd President: 1953-1961
Eisenhower Round, by Paul Moravec



A recent issue of The Atlantic featured an article entitled "The Tyranny of Defence Inc.," written by Andrew J. Bacevich, in which a sobering portrait is drawn of a Dwight D. Eisenhower as he left office.  More prophetic than even he himself knew, Eisenhower comes across as a man at once responsible for much of the dangerous state of our current geo-political situation, and wise enough to recognize that danger.  Ultimately, it's a complexity not often credited to Ike.


John Fitzgerald Kennedy - “The best road to progress is freedom’s road.”
35th President: 1961-1963
Freedom’s Road, by Robert Beaser


Music You Love, As It Happened

Friday, February 18, 2011
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Thank you!  For the week of Valentine's Day, we asked you for the music you love most, and hundreds of people responded.  Time constraints prevented us from accomodating all of your submissions on the air during the week. 

But please continue to listen, as those pieces we didn't have a chance to offer at this time will be featured in the coming weeks as part of our Four O'Clock Request, heard each weekday afternoon.

And thank you as well for making our three-day community campaign a huge success!  Your generous contributions will enable 99.5 All Classical to continue to thrive and grow as a vital cultural resource for Boston, New England, and beyond.

And now, for those pieces you love most, here they are, as they appeared on the radio...



Friday February 18th
8pm
Dvorak: Symphony No. 9, "From the New World"

7pm
Holst: The Planets

6pm
Orff: Carmina Burana: O Fortuna

5pm
Strauss: Radetsky March

4pm
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise

3pm
Saint-Saëns: Symphony No. 3, "Organ"

2pm
Bach: "Sheep May Safely Graze," from Cantata No. 208

1pm
Elgar: Salut d'Amour

noon
Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 21:  II. Andante

11am
Ravel: Bolero

10am
Vaughn Williams: Fantasia on Greensleeves

9am
Debussy: Claire de Lune

8am
Puccini: Turandot:  "Nessun Dorma"

7am
Addinsell: Warsaw Concerto

6am
Vivaldi: "Winter," from The Four Seasons

Thursday February 17th
7pm
Rachmaninoff: Cello Sonata

6pm
Bach: Partita No. 2 for Solo Violin

5pm
Beethoven: Für Elise

4pm
Fauré: Requiem:  In Paradisum

3pm
Mozart: Rondo Alla Turca

2pm
Grieg: Peer Gynt Suite No. 1

1pm
Mozart: Clarinet Quintet

noon
Copland: Appalachian Spring

11am
Beethoven: Symphony No. 9, "Choral":  Ode to Joy

10am
Schubert Impromptus, Op. 90:  Nos. 3 & 4

9am
Randall Thompson: Alleluia

8am
Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue

7am
Rossini: William Tell Overture

6am
Vivaldi: "Fall," from The Four Seasons

Wednesday, February 16th
7pm
Debussy: Images, Book 1

6pm
Bach: Goldberg Variations: Aria

5pm
Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake

4pm
Debussy: Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun

3pm
Mahler: Symphony No. 5:  IV. Adagietto

2pm
Vaughn Williams: The Lark Ascending

1pm
Beethoven: Cello Sonata in C, Op. 102 No. 1

noon
Beethoven: Symphony No. 5:  I. Allegro con brio

11am
Shostakovich: Piano Concerto No. 2

10am
Chopin: Fantasy Impromptu in C-sharp minor, Op. 66

9am
Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 2

8am
Mozar:  Eine Keine Nachtmusik (selection from the Hathaway School, New Bedford, MA)

7am
Barber: Adagio for Strings

6am
Wagner: Overture to Tannhäuser

Tuesday February 15th
7pm
Chaminade: Concertino for Flute and Piano

6pm
Mozart: Ave Verum Corpus

5pm
Smetana: The Moldau
Beethoven: Leonore Overture No. 3

4pm
Vivaldi: Mandolin Concerto

3pm
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No.5, "Emperor"

2pm
Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 5

1pm
Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique

noon
Schubert: Quartet No. 14, "Death and the Maiden"

11am
Beethoven: Symphony No. 7

10am
Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto No. 2

9am
Tárrega: Recuerdos de la Alhambra

8am
Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier

7am
Vivaldi: "Summer," from The Four Seasons

6am
Villa Lobos: Bachianas Brasileiras No. 5

Monday, February 14th
7pm
Rachmaninoff: Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini

6pm
Beethoven: Sonata No. 14, "Moonlight"

5pm
Mozart: Symphony No. 41, "Jupiter"

4pm
Stravinsky: Suite from The Firebird

3pm
Mozart: Flute Concerto in D, K. 314

2pm
Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1

1pm
Ravel: String Quartet

noon
Beethoven: Romance No. 2 for Violin & Orchestra

11am
Giorgio Mainerio: Schiarazula Marazula (selected by the Conservatory Lab Charter School, Brighton, MA)

Bach: Solo Cello Suite No. 1

10am
Beethoven: Symphony No. 6, "Pastoral"

9am
Amy Beach: Piano Concerto

8am
Vivaldi: "Spring," from The Four Seasons

7am
Massenet: Meditation from Thaïs

6am
Pachelbel: Canon in D

Ben Roe Named Managing Director of Classical Services

Thursday, February 17, 2011
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Veteran public radio producer and manager Benjamin K. Roe has been named Managing Director of WGBH’s Classical Services. In this role, Roe will guide the overall strategy for 99.5 All Classical services, including programming, live performances and special events.

Roe joins WGBH after serving as the general manager of WDAV Radio in Davidson, North Carolina, since 2008, and his extensive experience with NPR dates back to 1982 with WUMB and WBUR in Boston, where he was one of the early producers of Car Talk. From there, he moved into NPR’s Cultural Programming division, serving in a variety of roles including Director of Music and Music Initiatives from 2002 to 2007.

Marita Rivero, WGBH Vice President and General Manager for Radio and Television said, “When we acquired 99.5 more than a year ago, our mission was to preserve and develop classical music in this region.  Ben will certainly be an asset to WGBH, as we strive to provide the best possible classical services and continue to enhance the listener experience.”

An accomplished producer, Roe earned a Grammy Award in 1998 for a recording of Benjamin Britten’s War Requiem by the Washington Chorus and is also a recipient of the Chairman’s Medal from the National Endowment for the Arts, a George Foster Peabody and ASCAP-Deems Taylor Award for NPR’s Performance Today and the National Medal of the Arts for NPR Cultural Programming.

Arts leaders around Boston applauded the appointment of Roe, including Marie-Hélène Bernard, Executive Director and CEO of the Handel and Haydn Society, who said, “Ben Roe brings a wealth of experience in radio broadcasting, true intelligence to programming and a passion for classical music.”

Rob Hayes, Assistant Vice President for External Affairs at the Berklee College of Music, said, "Ben Roe is one of the most astute broadcasters in the United States. He has a true, 20,000-foot view of the relationships between music, radio, and the web -- probably as good as there is -- and a legacy of seminal public radio programs he's helped to create. A city of smart people, with best-of-category producers of culture, just got a new friend and champion. I am thrilled that Ben is coming to WGBH.”

Gerald Slavet and Jennifer Hurley-Wales, co-CEOs of From the Top, said, “We have known Ben for years and are thrilled to see him come back to Boston. We worked closely with him when he was at NPR and his insight and advice have been most valuable over the years. We look forward to collaborating with him in his new capacity at 99.5, as we work together to keep the classical music scene vibrant here in Boston.”

And Mark Volpe, Boston Symphony Orchestra Managing Director, said, “WGBH is incredibly fortunate to have Ben Roe join the team at 99.5 All Classical. Many of us at the BSO have enjoyed working closely with Ben on such NPR broadcasts as the opening of Ozawa Hall at Tanglewood, the Symphony Hall Centennial Celebration, and a James Levine-led performance of Mahler’s Symphony of a Thousand - the maestro’s first concert as BSO music director. Ben’s creative spirit and unquestionable professionalism, along with his uncanny ability to find workable solutions to tough challenges, are just a few of his impressive qualities. We look forward to collaborating with Ben on the BSO’s broadcast presence on 99.5.”

Valentine's Week Picks

By Music You Love, By The Hour   |   Wednesday, February 16, 2011
0 Comments   0 comments.

For the week of Valentine's Day, we asked our listeners to tell us what classical music they love most.  And each hour, from 6am to 8pm, you can hear what those favorites are!  Be sure to stay tuned and check here for the latest selections. 


Wednesday, Feb. 16

7pm
Debussy: Images, Book 1

  • Larry Thompson, Hampstead NH – “The beauty of the picture one gets hearing the music.”


6pm
Bach: Aria from the Goldberg Variations

  • Robert Waldner – “Its hard to say anything but wow-------I can feel my heart pounding at the end.”
  • Dean Diggins, Kittery ME – “The Dimitri Sitkovetky arrangement for string trio is remarkable.”
  • Peter Kniaz, Hopkinton, MA – “I love this piece because it is so beautiful. It always improves my morale.”
  • Moon Chul Jung – “I was very depressed with many things last year. I happened to see this music on the 'in-flight' music selections. I began to listen to it. Later I found myself relieved after repeatedly listening to this music throughout the 14-hour flight.”
  • Huw Powell, Lee NH – “I used to leave this playing on CD for days, weeks on end.”

5pm
Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake

  • Dr. Phil McLaren, Quincy MA – “We were courting in Chicago in 1960. At Christmas my parents in Germany, I went home with my sweetie for Christmas. Meanwhile, Sadler's Wells Ballet was coming. I brought the last two tickets together. She still wears my ring.”
  • Anne MacPherson, Toronto, ON – “I have heard and played classical music all my life, but wasn't hooked until I qualified to play (second violin) in a high school orchestra, a life-altering social experience.
  • Trisha MacIntyre, Dedham, MA – “I love the ballet.”


4pm
Debussy: Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun

  • Deborah Kellogg, Wallingford, CT – “In seventh grade my general music teacher played this piece for us and I thought it was the most beautiful thing I had ever heard ... it made me a lifetime classical music fan.”
  • Elaine Henriksen, Stoughton, MA – “This piece is a picture of peace in the world of nature, captured by Debussy in the beauty of music.”
  • Gregory Leschishin, Waltham, MA – “I used to listen to this piece to calm my nerves after a long day teaching third graders!”

3pm
Mahler: Adagietto, from Symphony No. 5

  • Earnest Wu, Chelmsford MA
  • Mike Bassett, Easton, MA – “Romance of course!”
  • Phil Schwarz, Framingham, MA – “The ultimate love song. If you play it, consider allowing the Finale to follow the Adagietto. The Adagietto is night-music and the transition to the morning-music of the Finale is one of my favorite musical sunrises.”
  • Peter Carney, Warwick, RI – “It says it all. Period. In Sept 1990 I heard the BSO and Ozawa perform and record it, then went to Fenway for the final home stand against the Jays where the Sox took 2 of 3. My seat was 11 rows directly behind home plate. It was a perfect day.”


2pm
Vaughn Williams: The Lark Ascending

  • Marc Lane, Escondido, CA – “Ralph Vaughn Williams captured the essence of nature at its beauty and calming effect on humanity.”
  • Joan Dillon, Andover, MA – “Wish I could play violin with such passion. The tune is like the journey that ends well!”
  • Ginny Kingsbury, Worcester, MA
  • Elaine Henriksen, Stoughton, MA - "As a lover of flora and fauna, and a believer in peace, I find this piece by Vaughn Williams a beautiful musical replication of peace on earth and in the heavens."
  • Sharon Cores, North Reading, MA – “More than almost any other piece I can think of, Vaughn Williams has painted a vivid picture ... the lark on a summer morning ... playing on the wind ... soaring and free ... no matter how many times I hear it I am always deeply touched.”
  • Kirk Companion, Acton, MA – “So English … so thoughts of English Gardens floating in my head when I hear it.”
  • Mark Exley, Brookline, MA – “Hard to choose one of his short sweet masterpieces, but this for me hits the heights even over Theme from Tallis. Greensleeves, while gorgeous, has been overexposed. By the way, can we have 10 choices next time, I was just warming up!”
  • Daniel Kocsis – “I love the joy of the piece, the freedom being released.”
  • Donna Wysokenski – “I'm a birder and this piece evokes for me the peace and tranquility I experience when I go outdoors and listen.”
  • Leslie Drawbaugh, Bozeman, MT – “The soulfulness, the sadness, the deeply moving of my heart to its melody. I really do not know. It is just a piece of music that resonates within my being. I can relate to it.”
  • Cynthia Xenakis, Wayland, MA – “It contains the most beautiful violin solo I have ever heard. You can almost see the lark ascending.”
  • Joann Frankhouser, Kenskington, NH – “Its lyricism makes me feel that I take flight right along with the lark.”


1pm
Beethoven: Cello Sonata in C, Op. 102 No. 1

  • Roger Falcon, Medford, MA – “The photo in the EMI booklet of Daniel Barenboim and Jacqueline Dupre together has to show one of the most in love couples I have ever seen. In fact, anything performed by Du Pre would be among my all time favorites.”


noon
Beethoven: Symphony No. 5, movement I, Allegro con brio

  • Erik S., Providence RI – “It's the first piece I can remember hearing as a child. I rarely hear it in its entirety, but when I do, it's such a treat. Each movement is so evocative in its own way.”
  • Mark Levine, St. Robert, MO – “My father gave me my first classical record when I was about 7. It was the Book-of-the-Month Club Music Appreciation Recording of Beethoven's 5th. I've listened to that piece hundreds of times and never tire of it!”
  • Rod Hardesty, Kansas City, MO – “It's exciting it keeps you the edge of your chair. It was hard to choose between Beethoven and Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique. But Beethoven 5th is equally good on your radio station, but Berlioz, it is best to be heard live!!”

11am
Shostakovich: Piano Concerto No. 2

  • Sally Seaver, Concord, MA – “First piano concerto I loved the first time out”
  • Diane Frazzette, Arlington, MA – “Soulful, romantic, dramatic and moving.
  • Marion Wollmeringer – “Just so much fun to listen to.”


10am
Chopin: Fantasy Impromptu in C-sharp minor, Op. 66

  • Doris Horgan, Shrewsbury, MA – “The music unrevised and complete is still compelling and amazing to me, but seems to have been forgotten by many.”
  • Anne Mesgar, Manchester, MA – “He is my favorite composer! A true romantic in style and execution. His work is so unique.”
  • Daniel Wiedenheft, Merrimack, NH – “I heard this piece on the radio when I was in junior high and didn't know what it was called. I spent the next two decades searching for it. Then during my commute to work a few years ago, WCRB played the piece and I finally found out what it was.”


9am
Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 2

  • Roger St. Laurent, Northwood, NH – “My all-time favorite classical piece - the trumpet part is so bright, standing out over the other instruments. I love Bach's brilliant use of it, and the extreme contrast of the two outer movements with the quiet middle one with no trumpets at all.”
  • Richard Schneider, Boston, MA – “Do I have to choose one? OK, #2.”



8:45am
Mozart: Eine Keine Nachtmusik

  • Hathaway School, New Bedford, MA – Requested by the 5th graders, with Mr. Correia, Mrs. Pierce and Ms. Murphy. The students like it because "the intro gets our attention for the music to come.” This music reminded the students of a dinner party or somewhere fancy.


7am
Barber: Adagio for Strings

  • Dr. John Dieter, Vilseck Germany – “The most heart wrenching yet angelic piece ever. This Adagio was not composed but gleaned from the ethos.”
  • Karen Aalto, Groveland, MA – “It took us a lot of years & doctors to get pregnant with my son. I first REALLY listened to the piece when I was finally pregnant with him, and it embodied the longing and love I felt for him - before he was even conceived.”
  • Guy Colonna, Halifax, MA – “It's a very moving piece and when Laura Carlo played it at the 1st anniversary of 9/11 it really captured the solemnity of the occasion.”
  • Joseph Massey, Exeter, NH – “the whole piece is quite introspective, as well as soothing!”
  • Timothy Daley, Clinton, MA – “It's soothing to listen to.”
  • Katheryn Faria, Acton, MA – “Beautiful, melodic, sorrowful, and joyful all at once.”
  • Michael Long, Newmarket, NH – “Just keeps going and going - a lovely piece.”
  • Cynthia Konda, Shrewsbury, MA – “It is fragile, achingly emotional. Pure catharsis.”
  • Mildred Cacicio – “It's just so beautiful, and sends your mind to another place.”
  • Joseph Su, Lexington MA – “The song helps me to look inward and to create a serene state of mind.”


6am
Wagner: Overture to Tannhäuser

  • Christopher Paul, Manchester NH – “This is one of those pieces that makes me crank the stereo! I just can't help it! The grace of redemption pours through with every note!”

Tuesday, Feb. 15


7pm
Chaminade: Concertino for Flute and Piano

  • Daniel Wiedenheft, Merrimack, NH - “The trills and virtuosity of the piece bring a tear to my eye every time I hear it.”


6pm
Mozart: Ave Verum Corpus

  • Kay Scholzman, Brookline MA - “I once heard an NPR interview with children's-book author, Maurice Sendak, in which he said that he imagined that, in heaven, the angels sing the ‘Ave Verum Corpus.’”


5pm
Smetana: The Moldau

  • Bill Gresho, Dracut, MA - “I am of Slovak / German descent. Is that not enough. As I grew up I was not aware of the musical heritage from Czechoslovakia. I was led to believe that Slovaks had no class -- Listening to the beauty of the flowing music reaffirms my heritage.”
  • Lois Hutchings, Maynard, MA - “Two streams of flute & clarinet meld into the pulsing current of the full orchestra. Bohemian cultural vignettes of a peasant wedding, the hunt, perilous rapids, dreams, and a nationally revered fortress sweep me away.”
  • Christine Burdette - “Must be my Slavic roots that cause me to be moved by the almost visual beauty of this music.”
  • Sandra Hurd, Merrimack, NH - “I have been to the Moldau River and it is very beautiful.”


Beethoven: Leonore Overture No. 3

  • Mary Beaudry, Burlington, MA


4pm
Vivaldi: Mandolin Concerto

  • Frank Schepps - “Happy and upbeat.”


3pm
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No.5 "Emperor"

  • Hinda Blum, Brookline, MA - “The melodies and interwoven chords are beautifully lyrical and highly memorable.”
  • John Citron, Haverhill, MA - “Beethoven has always been a favorite of mine. In particular his Emperor Concerto is right up there in the upper echelons of music greatness. I get goose pimples when I think about the music and hear it in my head!”
  • Barry Pease, Melrose, MA - “At a time long ago this piece sustained me on a stormed tossed night when I was moving from my home and my cat got outside not to reappear until a week later, by the grace of God.”
  • Peter McGurk, Randolph, MA - “Love the second movement”
  • Linda Strecker, Ridge, NY - “I love the 2nd slow movement’s gorgeous melodies and then the way it connects to the final movement with this sense of joyous celebration! It makes one want to jump for joy perhaps when the Patriots would emerge victorious at a Superbowl!”
  • Patricia Zoda, Wakefield, MA - “Nothing else compares to this concerto. It exudes the genius that Beethoven was.”


2pm
Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 5

  • Pamela Liu, Lynn, MA - “In high school, I played violin in the orchestra and these were 2 of the conductor's favorites and now mine. The music is upbeat and uplifting.”
  • William Sullivan, Dover, MA - “Pure joy!”


1pm
Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique

  • Louisa Damiano, Sterling, MA - “I love the Berlioz for its rich colors and vivid description of the story line, and all the wonderful brass and woodwind writing.”
  • Paul Loefstedt, Bedford, NH - “Incredibly innovative and emotionally evocative. Considering this was written in 1830, it is decades ahead of its time.”
  • Steven Praeger, Everett, MA - “My wife's favorite.”
  • Bill Gresho, Dracut, MA - "A love tale in music and my introduction to programme music.”


noon
Schubert: Quartet No. 14 "Death and the Maiden"

  • Jack Wisdom, Arlington, MA - “I just never get tired of listening to it.”
  • Virgil Vickers, Newton, MA


11am
Beethoven: Symphony No. 7

  • Susan Livingtson - “I studied it at Smith College in the Music Appreciation course.”
  • Richard Dillon - “Beautiful Second Movement.”
  • Carmella McCormack - “There is a very gradual crescendo over the entire length of the movement, starting out very quietly and growing to the final, booming conclusion. Each section of the orchestra adds another layer of complexity when they join in.”
  • Nadine Obermiller, Amherst, MA - “Inspiring.”
  • Fred Stewart and Suzie De Mulder of Stratham NH - “Exciting.”
  • Mark Ellis, Petersham, MA - “A tour de force that takes you through life's stages, from adolescence, to the struggle of mid-life, to the beginnings of success, and to final triumph. The 7th has it all.”
  • Eva Adams, Arlington, MA - “I especially love the way Beethoven repeats the theme in the slow movement. He constantly makes you see something new in the theme and weaves it throughout the entire orchestra.”


10am
Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto No. 2

  • Victoria and George Nawn - “Lush and melodic. Rachmaninoff is a wonderful throwback to the romantics.”
  • Susan Leavy - “This piece seems to me to embody all of the elements of pure love: passion, power, beauty and sadness.”
  • David Zeitlin, Stonington, CT - “It is beautiful, the second movement never fails to bring me to tears.”
  • Denise Kwok, Arlington, MA - “A very moving piece”
  • Linda Anderson, Reno, NV - “It's a very romantic piece of music - very passionate.”
  • Marianne Klepser, Wayland, MA - “I don't know, I just do! I find it ineffably beautiful.”
  • Rebecca Henry, Strafford, NH - “In college I played this at night to go to sleep by.”
  • Ann Jones, Groveland, MA - “After a few years of basic piano lessons, a new teacher thrilled/terrified me, challenging me with themes from this concerto -simplified, yes, but REAL music that continues to validate my love ever since.”
  • Susan Russell, Clinton, MA - “One of the first classical records I ever bought. Practically wore it out.”
  • Mary Cassidy, Swampscott, MA - “Brings back memories of my Great Aunt Katie who was a concert pianist and played this often. Although a popular piece for concerts, it seems always to be new.”
  • Jane Eccles, East Orleans, MA - “I heard Jon Nakamatsu perform this concerto with the Cape Cod Symphony. Fabulous!”
  • Don Gage, Framingham, MA - “It was my mother's favorite, and I always love listening to it.”
  • Hoyt Bowman, Ayer, MA - “The romantic Rachmaninoff striking a tenderly receptive chord. One of the first classical pieces I heard, and so was instrumental in forming my solid liking of classical music.”
  • Jim Malo, Northbridge, MA - “Through all 3 movements, this piece exhibits real drama without the video. But leaving it to our imagination makes it all the more enjoyable. This is a piece to savor. Sit back, close your eyes, turn it up to "live" volume, and enjoy!”
  • Mike Hachey, Billerica, MA - “I just like it.”
  • Rod Hardesty, Kansas City, MO
  • Ray Lampe, Templeton, MA
  • Kathleen Barlow, Jaffrey, NH


9am
Tárrega: Recuerdos de la Alhambra

  • Kerry Burak, Winchendon, MA - “It is such a moving piece of music. I can hear the joy and sadness in it and imagine the story it tries to tell.”
  • Ambrose, Laing, Wilmington, MA - “It is a very beautiful little piece -- while it is technically difficult to play well, the musical 'big picture' is sweet and packed with charm.”
  • Maribel Pintado - “The most exquisite narrative of love. This piece moves every layer of memory... and takes you there.”


8am (Keith's Classical Corner Feature!)
Richard Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier

  • R. Spencer Wright, Somerville, MA - “My favorite opera - the characters are so well-drawn, and the music is as rich as Viennese Sachertorte.”


7am
Vivaldi: The Four Seasons - "Summer"

  • Janetlee Norris - “This piece I could listen to over and over again...my 7 and 5 year olds both love it too! It is so powerful and just overall incredible. I love all of the 4 Seasons, but this is my favorite...the music encompasses all emotions!“
  • Joan Dillon, Andover, MA - “I love the speed and the bright cheerful sound of Vivaldi's music. It transcends you.”
  • Diane Tripp, Milford, NH - “I love the way the passion is heard in the music. I have a special CD & DVD edition that I got after I heard this on your station, the violinist Federico Agostini would make Vivaldi proud.”


6am
Villa Lobos: Bachianas Brasileiras No. 5

  • Sue Feldman, Framingham, MA - “Bachianas Brasileiras no. 5 is a gem--haunting and elegant. The piece needs to be played as originally written, for 8 celli and soprano. Bidu Sayao sang it perfectly, humming the last part.”
  • Maribel Pintado - “It has everything. Love, nostalgia, redemption, joi de vivre... Cello and voice in the most exquisite combination.”
  • Elena Lebedev, Natick, MA


Monday, Feb. 14 


7pm
Rachmaninoff: Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini

  • Kathleen Barlow, Jaffrey NH
  • Ruth-Ellen Mason, Hampstead, NH


6pm
Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 14 "Moonlight"

  • Huw Powell, Lee, NH
  • Sandra Hurd, Merrimack, NH - "Because of its free flowing beauty."


5pm
Mozart: Symphony No. 41 "Jupiter"

  • Gary Bush, Beverly, MA - "Listening to Mozart's Symphony #41 saves money spent on airline tickets. it is as close to soaring as classical music can move me. "


4pm
Stravinsky: Firebird Suite

  • Laurie Shaw-Smith, Ann Arbor, MI - "Played in orchestra years ago and fell in love with it. It's peaceful, exciting and mysterious all at once."
  • Jim Fitzgerald, Westford, MA - "Incredible dynamics, my wife likes it and it's got a 'little' bit of a Valentine connection. Tough to choose only 3. Thanks for the opportunity."
  • Elias Coulouras Beverly, MA - "It moves my heart and soul."
  • James Gleason, Boston, MA - "The slowly building crescendo of this piece and it's final resolution is chillingly beautiful."


3pm
Mozart: Flute Concerto in D K. 314

  • Molly M., Mendon, MA - "This is my current Flute piece. I love it so much even though it is very challenging! I have been playing for four years and this my audition piece for several youth wind ensembles and youth symphonies in the greater Boston area. Let's hope I make it!"


2pm
Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1

  • Louis, Winchester Community Music School - "My name is Louis and I am 9 years old. I play violin at Winchester Community Music School. I like the chords in the begining and the concerto makes me happy."
  • Daniel Wiedenheft, Merrimack, NH - "A balance of power and beauty between the strong piano chords and the tremulous violin - I once had a dream that I was playing this piece before a packed auditorium in Europe."


1pm
Ravel: String Quartet

  • Betsy Shackelford - "This was the first piece of chamber music I saw and heard performed live, in a very intimate space, and it utterly enchanted me, and still does."


noon
Beethoven: Romance No. 2 for Violin & Orchestra

  • James Stratton, Bedford, NH - "Simply the most breathtaking piece ever composed in my humble opinion."
  • Christopher Paul, Manchester, NH - "Beethoven did not err in naming this a romance! To me it evokes all the sentiments of true love - beauty, longing, single-minded devotion, selflessness, joy!"


11am SPECIAL ENTRY FROM CONSERVATORY LAB CHARTER SCHOOL
Giorgio Mainerio: Schiarazula Marazula
and
JS Bach: Solo Cello Suite No. 1

Requested by Ms. Rachel Cates and the 5th grade Listening Project Class at the Conservatory Lab Charter School in Brighton, MA  - "We chose Schiarazula Marazula because it is fun and you can dance to it. When we first listened to it, we didn’t think it was classical musical because it is so lively. It opened our minds to a different kind of classical music. We also liked learning about the medieval instruments. At first the instruments looked strange, but we could see their kinship with the instruments we play today and how instruments have evolved over time."

"We chose Bach Solo Cello Suite #1 (performed by Yo-Yo Ma) because four of us play cello in our El Sistema school orchestra. It inspires us to get to this level of playing on the cello."

Conservatory Lab is K-1 to 5 elementary Boston charter school with a unique music focus. It is the first elementary school in the country to totally incorporate the El Sistema model into the daily school schedule. El Sistema is a network of youth orchestras, begun in Venezuela, that uses ensemble music as a vehicle for social change. Every day, students are immersed in instrumental, choir, music literacy and world percussion classes, as well as string orchestra and wind ensemble. For more information, visit our website at www.conservatorylab.org.

10am
Beethoven: Symphony No. 6, "Pastoral"

  • Harvey Hansen, Arlington, MA - "Peaceful, relaxing (except maybe for the thunderstorm)"
  • Tom Breton, Walpole, MA - "It's is full of sunny themes that seemingly did not fit in the tempestuous 5th (written at the same time)."
  • Jennifer Dewar, Billerica, NH - "Love that it really suggests being out in nature with musical representations of birds, flowing water etc. Makes me smile. Also in awe of all Beethoven accomplished as a composer while deaf."
  • Shirley Jenkins, Duxbury, MA - "It makes me feel like summer!!"
  • Christine Burdette - "Just so very beautiful...impossible not be involved and touched while listening...envisioning being in a pastoral setting."
  • Sally Sepka, Danville, NH
  • Deborah Hamilton, Pepperell, MA - "There is so much music that I love,but this comes directly from the first Disney Fantasia movie. Over the years the grandeur of the piece has grown for me, but I still see the Pegasus, Centaurs, and other animation when I hear it!"


9am
Amy Beach: Piano Concerto

  • James Hodson, Dover, NH - "It's big, Romantic, American, waiting to be discovered by audiences and performers alike -- perfect for Valentine's Day"


8am
Vivaldi: Four Seasons "Spring"

  • Diane Place, Marlborough, MA - "Its sound evokes "Spring" as an awakening, signifying new birth, new beginnings, memories of other "springs" and a general sense of expectation. It will help us deal with what's left of winter, to realize it's not too distant."
  • Janetlee Norris - "This piece I could listen to over and over again...my 7 and 5 year olds both love it too! It is so powerful and just overall incredible. I love all of the 4 Seasons, but this is my favorite...the music encompasses all emotions!"
  • Joan Dillon, Andover, MA - "I love the speed and the bright cheerful sound of Vivaldi's music. It transcends you."
  • Diane Tripp Milford, NH - "I love the way the passion is heard in the music. I have a special CD & DVD edition that I got after I heard this on your station, the violinist Federico Agostini would make Vivaldi proud."
  • Julie Wolkoff Wellesley, MA - "Long time favorite."
  •  

7am
Massenet: "Meditation" from Thaïs

  • Marlene Cote, Chelmsford, MA - "It made me fall in love with opera. The feeling is so rich with yearning."
  • Ku-chuan Hsiao, Tyngsboro, MA - "This is, to me, the most romatic piece of classical music ever written. It brings back lots of fond memories."
  • Diane Frazzette, Arlington, MA - "Very soothing and peaceful. I listen to it frequently during the workday to de-stress."
  • Pat Baker, Hampton, NH - "It's just so very beautiful!"


6am
Pachelbel: Canon in D

  • Kerry Burak, Winchendon, MA - "This is the very first piece of music I heard the first time I listened to your station. It's been my absolute favorite ever since."
  • Maureen Dwyer, Watertown, MA - "It always relaxes me!"
  • Lorie Mikulis - "Hearing Canon in D Major lets me escape the hectic world in which we live, if only for a short time. Music is my sanctuary and Canon in D Major opens the door to my special place."
  • Leslie Cheadle - "love"
  • Bridget Mahood, Ashland, MA - "I find it very moving."
  • Hoyt Bowman, Ayer, MA - "Its beauty and grace seem like the

The Music You Love, By The Hour

Wednesday, February 16, 2011
0 Comments   0 comments.

For the week of Valentine's Day, we asked our listeners to tell us what classical music they love most.  And each hour, from 6am to 8pm, you can hear what those favorites are!  Be sure to stay tuned and check here for the latest selections aired on Wednesday, Feb. 16, Thursday, Feb. 17, and Friday, Feb. 18.  For selections aired on Monday, Feb. 14, and Tuesday, Feb. 15, see Part 1.


Friday, Feb. 18


8pm
Dvorak: Symphony No. 9, "From the New World"

  • Vincent Castellon, Boston, MA – "Rousing and epic piece."
  • Marion Muskiewicz, Hudson, NH – "I first heard this piece on static-y radio as young teen from small town, who had just discovered a classical music station. Loved it from first hearing and always will."
  • Jeffrey Clark, Chestnut Hill, MA – "It began my love of classical music. It creates a wide variety of moods and paints many wonderful pictures, transporting one from misty fog over the lake in early morning to sunset over the majestic mountains and then the stars of early evening."
  • Madeline Cotugno, South Weymouth, MA – "Heard it many years ago as a youngster and loved it from my first hearing."
  • TC Mattocks, Uxbridge, MA – "The second movement, with its absolutely heart-stopping beauty, always moves me to 'hum along' in my basso profundo."
  • Pamela Liu, Lynn, MA – "First heard it in college on the radio and fell in love with it. It was my first classical album I ever bought. It soothes and calms me."
  • Peter Meyer, Bedford, MA
  • Jay O'Neill, Shirley, MA – "It was the first piece we studied extensively in my Introduction to Music course at Rutgers University. This began my lifelong love of classical music and subsequent collection of LPs, tapes and CDs representing all periods and types of music."


7pm
Holst: The Planets

  • Peter McGurk, Randolph MA
  • Janis Higgins, Medford MA – "It is hauntingly beautiful and surrounds the listener with its mysticism."


6pm
Orff: Carmina Burana:  O Fortuna
Betty Miller, W.Newton, MA – "It just sweeps me away - especially when seeing it performed (but hearing it is good, too)."
Gary Bush, Beverly, MA – "Listening to Carmina Burana brings me back to Symphony Hall in the early 50's when I was dating my future wife. At the conclusion I was speechless and felt transformed. After 56 years of marriage, I still enjoy that special memory."
Patricia Lane, Framingham, MA – "First heard it when Boston Ballet did a production back in the '80's. Passionate, exciting choral music that's not religious - fabulous!"
Brenda Pukas, Hope Valley, RI – "There is nothing in the world like listening to this amazing music."

5pm
Strauss: Radetsky March

  • Amy Demicco, Brookline, MA – "This piece is one of the most upbeat and engaging themes I've ever heard. Although repetitive, the Radetzky March makes for a perfect dance piece."


4pm
Rachmaninoff:  Vocalise

  • William Sullivan, Dover, MA


3pm
Saint-Saëns: Symphony No. 3, “Organ”

  • Joy Brett, Brookline, NH – "The first time I heard this piece of music was at a concert with my young children, where my sister was playing violin and suddenly we were amazed to hear a wonderful theme from the movie Babe, a real favorite, and we had trouble not giggling!"
  • Marion Muskiewicz, Hudson, NH – "I still get chills when they start that last movement with the organ chords."
  • Brenda Kinnunen, Salinas CA – "A glorious piece with one of the most magnificent endings that I can think of. Just makes me want to stand up and cheer."
  • Lawrence McLaughlin – "Every movement can stand on its own as a classical piece."


2pm
Bach: “Sheep May Safely Graze,” from Cantata No. 208

  • Patricia Zoda, Wakefield, MA – "It instantly reminds me of a beautiful deceased loved one."
  • Susan Russell, Clinton, MA – "It's about peace. Lordy knows we need lots of that right now."


1pm
Elgar: Salut d'Amour

  • Galeb Daouk, Belmont, MA – "Beautifully romantic and 'made for Valentines.'"
  • Leslie Taylor — "Beautiful, very melodic, romantic."


noon
Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 21, II. Andante (sometimes referred to as “Elvira Madigan”)

  • Jim Fitzgerald, Westford MA – "It helped get me into classical music and Mozart in particular. I never get tired of it."
  • Brad Greeley, New Castle NH – "Nobody can balance the piano and orchestra with the beauty of Mozart."
  • Larry Thompson, Hampstead, NH – "I love the softness between the piano and orchestra."
  • Nick Loy, Amherst, MA – "Elvia Madigan ... very, very romantic and in recent years seldom heard."


11am
Ravel: Bolero

  • Ellie Risley, Nashua NH
  • Kathleen Purcell, Carson City, NV – "I wore out a record of it when I was a few years older."
  • Larry Poulin, Rehoboth, MA – "It seems to be common knowledge among musicians that Ravel's Bolero is perfect for the bedroom. Everyone should try this aphrodisiac at least once in their lives."
  • Ruth Licata, Windham, NH – "I love it when parents and girls come up and say - What is that music; it's beautiful; is it new? 'Oh no,' I tell them, 'It's been around for years.' My team has a gymnastic warm-up to this piece."
  • Galeb Daouk, Belmont, MA – "Tried and truly romantic.. Even without the movie Ten, though brings Bo Derek's image to mind. This dates me I guess :-) "
  • Jean Whiting, No. Chelmsford, MA – "That relentless beat, the music that imprints itself on one's brain, the addition of instruments, building to a discordant climax, where I picture everyone falling into a heap on the floor!"


10am
Vaughan Williams: Fantasia on “Greensleeves”

  • Vincent Castellon, Boston, MA – "Song that originally got me into the genre, absolutely beautiful, noble piece."
  • Robert O'Day, Braintree, MA – "A mythical evocation of a world long gone and yet reawakened each time its spell is musically recast."


9am
Debussy: Claire de Lune

  • Nora Costa, Dedham, MA – "Just reminds me of spring and the hope of new love."
  • Deborah Hamilton, Pepperell MA – "Actually [I love] all of Debussy's piano music. 'Claire de Lune' because I used to be able to play it well (a long time ago)."


8am
Puccini: “Nessun Dorma,” from Turandot

  • Donna Campbell, Winchester, MA – "Chills! No matter how many times I hear it, I always get chills. It's a magnificent combination of gorgeous music and stupendous voice that, to my ear, surpasses all others."
  • Robert D'Amico, Nahant MA – "It give me the chills."
  • Bradford Clay, Harvard, MA – "When this piece gives you goose bumps from head to toe, you'll know why I like to say 'good music plays you'."


7am
Addinsell: Warsaw Concerto

  • Mary Cassidy, Swampscott, MA - "Wonderful showcase for piano. Beautiful and passionate and sad."
  • Alan Tarkiainen, North Oxford, MA - "It's just moving! The story of Addinsell's composition and finally finding a VHS copy of 'Dangerous Moonlight' has made me appreciate it all the more."
  • Diane Frazzette, Arlington, MA - "Passionate, dramatic, and moving."


6am
Vivaldi: "Winter," from The Four Seasons

  • Michael Oliveri, Boston, MA - "I love the energy in this piece and how it captures the feeling of the season. Winter in NE can bring us all down, but this piece turns that around with its powerful crescendos."
  • Julie Wolkoff, Wellesley, MA - "Long time favorite."

 

Thursday, Feb. 17

7pm
Rachmaninoff: Cello Sonata

  • Mimi Alberu, Candia, NH - "I first encountered Rachmaninoff's Op. 19 as an undergraduate music major. It radiates sheer, luminous beauty, especially the third movement."


6pm
Bach: Partita No. 2 for Solo Violin

  • Sarah Becker, Arlington, MA - 'The chaconne from this partita is the crowning achievement of Western Classical music. All of Bach's abilities of musicianship and instrumental technique are displayed. The violinist is taxed to the extreme."
  • Laura Howe, Providence, RI - "I first heard them over 30 years broadcast outside at night at a party. The solo violin sang in the giant pines with such piercing beauty that I wandered from the gathering of friends and simply stood alone in the dark to be with the music."
  • Irina Kechina, Hull, MA
  • Julia Schlozman - "I can't listen to the last movement without thinking of all of the wonderful violinists who have enriched my life."


5pm
Beethoven: Für Elise

  • Art Aiello – "I have always loved this piece. There's something haunting and sweet about it. I once had a girlfriend who played piano, and she would play it for me. My daughter has played it for me on the flute. It's always been top of my list."
  • Louis Burns – "It's fun to play on my violin from my 'Fake Music' Book!"


4pm
Faure: In Paradisum, from the Requiem

  • Alexandra Buckley, Athens, OH - "It's a heartbreakingly beautiful piece. Enough said."
  • Andrew Goodearl, Sherborn, MA - "The most beautiful combination of instruments, solo voice and choir - perfect!”
  • Steve Gartrell, Natick, MA – “While this is a requiem, it is lovely and tranquil."
  • Rosemarie Buxton, North Andover, MA - "For its vision of a gentle and loving presence in the afterlife."
  • Marilyn Lasek, Brookline MA - "So beautiful, and my sweetie and I love it. We are usually up late in our art studio, so it would be a treat to hear it, even late at night! Thank you!"


3pm
Mozart: Rondo Alla Turca

  • Anon., Acton, MA - "I know how to play it on the piano!"


2pm
Grieg: Peer Gynt Suite No. 1

  • John Dewey, Hanover, MA - "I work 11pm - 10am, and when Laura Carlo plays this, it help me get through those final few hours."
  • Pat Baker, Hampton, NH - "It just offers a perfect definition of 'good morning!'"


1pm
Mozart: Clarinet Quintet

  • Jacob Litoff - "With my younger brother playing clarinet and me playing the violin I fell in love with this piece when I was a kid and still it is one of my favorites."


noon
Copland: Appalachian Spring

  • Jeffrey Clark, Chestnut Hill, MA - "I especially love the ‘Variations on a Shaker theme.’ The whole piece conveys both the sense of being true to one's core values while being excited about the adventures that life brings."
  • Randolph Williams, Waltham, MA - "What could epitomize love more than Copland's masterpiece of Americana - the young couple, the community helping out the tender scene at the end. True love indeed."
  • David Kroening - "It's one of the very first pieces of classical music I was introduced to when I was four years old. Still my favorite even after all of the pieces I've managed to hear in my lifetime."
  • George Franz, Lancaster, MA - "I think this is Copland's finest, most completely formed work. Although it is often excerpted, it should be played in its entirety to appreciate the full sweep of the composition".
  • Louise Sherburne, Ipswich, MA - "Joyful, hopeful."
  • Paul Smith, Warren, RI - "Love to wake up to this."
  • Sue Housman - "Portrait of Americana."
  • Kim Reid, Concord, MA - "While living in Europe, I heard the piece and it drove home to me how utterly American its exuberance is."
  • Robert Fanning, Epping NH - "greatest American composer"


11am
Beethoven: Symphony No. 9, "Choral" - Ode to Joy

  • Beverly Clason, Boylston, MA – "The drama and the voices with the orchestra. I always think of the fall of the Berlin Wall when I hear this piece."
  • Anne Oliver, Boston, MA – "It expresses the soul of humanity."
  • Richard Wiggin, Concord, MA – "Any Beethoven is wonderful, but this one always gives me chills. It is so spiritual!"
  • Andrew Biagi, Brookline MA – "A classic, and we never tire of it. Simply one of the best. The cats love it too. They listen to 99.5 all day."
  • Jeanne Fonda, Haverhill, MA – "The choral part is so uplifting & timely - love for all humanity!"


10am
Schubert Impromptus, Op. 90, No. 3 & No. 4

  • John Citron, Haverhill MA - "These pieces are very close to my heart. When I was growing up, I studied these with a very dear friend of the family. My piano teacher, who is now 90, just retired from teaching."
  • Tom Breton, Walpole, MA - "The moto perpetuo that flows thru most of this piece is at times sinuous, at times leaping, and always compelling. The minor motif complements it perfectly."
  • Mark Ellis, Petersham, MA - "So soothing - like rain in a Japanese garden, dripping into a stream and flowing over mossy stones."


9am
Randall Thompson: Alleluia

  • Rebecca Henry, Straffod NH - "It's peaceful and moving and I sang it in high school."


8am
Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue

  • Ann Jones, Groveland, MA
  • Jim Malo, Northbridge MA
  • Ruth Licata, Windham, NH
  • Peter Meyer, Bedford MA


7am
Rossini: William Tell Overture

  • Josephine Pitassi, North Providence, RI
  • Harvey Hansen, Arlington, MA


6am
Vivaldi: "Fall," from The Four Seasons

  • Jennifer Dewar, Billerica, MA - "I can visualize the seasons and characteristics of each."
  • Julie Wolkoff, Wellesley, MA - "Long time favorite."


Wednesday, Feb. 16


7pm
Debussy: Images, Book 1

  • Larry Thompson, Hampstead NH – “The beauty of the picture one gets hearing the music.”


6pm
Bach: Aria from the Goldberg Variations

  • Robert Waldner – “Its hard to say anything but wow-------I can feel my heart pounding at the end.”
  • Dean Diggins, Kittery ME – “The Dimitri Sitkovetky arrangement for string trio is remarkable.”
  • Peter Kniaz, Hopkinton, MA – “I love this piece because it is so beautiful. It always improves my morale.”
  • Moon Chul Jung – “I was very depressed with many things last year. I happened to see this music on the 'in-flight' music selections. I began to listen to it. Later I found myself relieved after repeatedly listening to this music throughout the 14-hour flight.”
  • Huw Powell, Lee NH – “I used to leave this playing on CD for days, weeks on end.”

5pm
Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake

  • Dr. Phil McLaren, Quincy MA – “We were courting in Chicago in 1960. At Christmas my parents in Germany, I went home with my sweetie for Christmas. Meanwhile, Sadler's Wells Ballet was coming. I brought the last two tickets together. She still wears my ring.”
  • Anne MacPherson, Toronto, ON – “I have heard and played classical music all my life, but wasn't hooked until I qualified to play (second violin) in a high school orchestra, a life-altering social experience.
  • Trisha MacIntyre, Dedham, MA – “I love the ballet.”


4pm
Debussy: Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun

  • Deborah Kellogg, Wallingford, CT – “In seventh grade my general music teacher played this piece for us and I thought it was the most beautiful thing I had ever heard ... it made me a lifetime classical music fan.”
  • Elaine Henriksen, Stoughton, MA – “This piece is a picture of peace in the world of nature, captured by Debussy in the beauty of music.”
  • Gregory Leschishin, Waltham, MA – “I used to listen to this piece to calm my nerves after a long day teaching third graders!”


3pm
Mahler: Adagietto, from Symphony No. 5

  • Earnest Wu, Chelmsford MA
  • Mike Bassett, Easton, MA – “Romance of course!”
  • Phil Schwarz, Framingham, MA – “The ultimate love song. If you play it, consider allowing the Finale to follow the Adagietto. The Adagietto is night-music and the transition to the morning-music of the Finale is one of my favorite musical sunrises.”
  • Peter Carney, Warwick, RI – “It says it all. Period. In Sept 1990 I heard the BSO and Ozawa perform and record it, then went to Fenway for the final home stand against the Jays where the Sox took 2 of 3. My seat was 11 rows directly behind home plate. It was a perfect day.”


2pm
Vaughn Williams: The Lark Ascending

  • Marc Lane, Escondido, CA – “Ralph Vaughn Williams captured the essence of nature at its beauty and calming effect on humanity.”
  • Joan Dillon, Andover, MA – “Wish I could play violin with such passion. The tune is like the journey that ends well!”
  • Ginny Kingsbury, Worcester, MA
  • Elaine Henriksen, Stoughton, MA - "As a lover of flora and fauna, and a believer in peace, I find this piece by Vaughn Williams a beautiful musical replication of peace on earth and in the heavens."
  • Sharon Cores, North Reading, MA – “More than almost any other piece I can think of, Vaughn Williams has painted a vivid picture ... the lark on a summer morning ... playing on the wind ... soaring and free ... no matter how many times I hear it I am always deeply touched.”
  • Kirk Companion, Acton, MA – “So English … so thoughts of English Gardens floating in my head when I hear it.”
  • Mark Exley, Brookline, MA – “Hard to choose one of his short sweet masterpieces, but this for me hits the heights even over Theme from Tallis. Greensleeves, while gorgeous, has been overexposed. By the way, can we have 10 choices next time, I was just warming up!”
  • Daniel Kocsis – “I love the joy of the piece, the freedom being released.”
  • Donna Wysokenski – “I'm a birder and this piece evokes for me the peace and tranquility I experience when I go outdoors and listen.”
  • Leslie Drawbaugh, Bozeman, MT – “The soulfulness, the sadness, the deeply moving of my heart to its melody. I really do not know. It is just a piece of music that resonates within my being. I can relate to it.”
  • Cynthia Xenakis, Wayland, MA – “It contains the most beautiful violin solo I have ever heard. You can almost see the lark ascending.”
  • Joann Frankhouser, Kenskington, NH – “Its lyricism makes me feel that I take flight right along with the lark.”


1pm
Beethoven: Cello Sonata in C, Op. 102 No. 1

  • Roger Falcon, Medford, MA – “The photo in the EMI booklet of Daniel Barenboim and Jacqueline Dupre together has to show one of the most in love couples I have ever seen. In fact, anything performed by Du Pre would be among my all time favorites.”


noon
Beethoven: Symphony No. 5, movement I, Allegro con brio

  • Erik S., Providence RI – “It's the first piece I can remember hearing as a child. I rarely hear it in its entirety, but when I do, it's such a treat. Each movement is so evocative in its own way.”
  • Mark Levine, St. Robert, MO – “My father gave me my first classical record when I was about 7. It was the Book-of-the-Month Club Music Appreciation Recording of Beethoven's 5th. I've listened to that piece hundreds of times and never tire of it!”
  • Rod Hardesty, Kansas City, MO – “It's exciting it keeps you the edge of your chair. It was hard to choose between Beethoven and Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique. But Beethoven 5th is equally good on your radio station, but Berlioz, it is best to be heard live!!”


11am
Shostakovich: Piano Concerto No. 2

  • Sally Seaver, Concord, MA – “First piano concerto I loved the first time out”
  • Diane Frazzette, Arlington, MA – “Soulful, romantic, dramatic and moving.
  • Marion Wollmeringer – “Just so much fun to listen to.”


10am
Chopin: Fantasy Impromptu in C-sharp minor, Op. 66

  • Doris Horgan, Shrewsbury, MA – “The music unrevised and complete is still compelling and amazing to me, but seems to have been forgotten by many.”
  • Anne Mesgar, Manchester, MA – “He is my favorite composer! A true romantic in style and execution. His work is so unique.”
  • Daniel Wiedenheft, Merrimack, NH – “I heard this piece on the radio when I was in junior high and didn't know what it was called. I spent the next two decades searching for it. Then during my commute to work a few years ago, WCRB played the piece and I finally found out what it was.”


9am
Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 2

  • Roger St. Laurent, Northwood, NH – “My all-time favorite classical piece - the trumpet part is so bright, standing out over the other instruments. I love Bach's brilliant use of it, and the extreme contrast of the two outer movements with the quiet middle one with no trumpets at all.”
  • Richard Schneider, Boston, MA – “Do I have to choose one? OK, #2.”



8:45am
Mozart: Eine Keine Nachtmusik

  • Hathaway School, New Bedford, MA – Requested by the 5th graders, with Mr. Correia, Mrs. Pierce and Ms. Murphy. The students like it because "the intro gets our attention for the music to come.” This music reminded the students of a dinner party or somewhere fancy.


7am
Barber: Adagio for Strings

  • Dr. John Dieter, Vilseck Germany – “The most heart wrenching yet angelic piece ever. This Adagio was not composed but gleaned from the ethos.”
  • Karen Aalto, Groveland, MA – “It took us a lot of years & doctors to get pregnant with my son. I first REALLY listened to the piece when I was finally pregnant with him, and it embodied the longing and love I felt for him - before he was even conceived.”
  • Guy Colonna, Halifax, MA – “It's a very moving piece and when Laura Carlo played it at the 1st anniversary of 9/11 it really captured the solemnity of the occasion.”
  • Joseph Massey, Exeter, NH – “the whole piece is quite introspective, as well as soothing!”
  • Timothy Daley, Clinton, MA – “It's soothing to listen to.”
  • Katheryn Faria, Acton, MA – “Beautiful, melodic, sorrowful, and joyful all at once.”
  • Michael Long, Newmarket, NH – “Just keeps going and going - a lovely piece.”
  • Cynthia Konda, Shrewsbury, MA – “It is fragile, achingly emotional. Pure catharsis.”
  • Mildred Cacicio – “It's just so beautiful, and sends your mind to another place.”
  • Joseph Su, Lexington MA – “The song helps me to look inward and to create a serene state of mind.”


6am
Wagner: Overture to Tannhäuser

  • Christopher Paul, Manchester NH – “This is one of those pieces that makes me crank the stereo! I just can't help it! The grace of redemption pours through with every note!”

For Monday, Feb. 14, and Tuesday, Feb. 15, visit Part 1

Antidote for Winter: Free Concerts

By Laura Carlo   |   Monday, February 14, 2011
2 Comments   2 comments.

Feb. 16

The forecast tells us to expect spring-like temperatures later this week (50s---mid-Februrary! Yay!), but “seasoned” New Englanders will tell you there’s every reason to expect another snow storm or two before the official start of spring on March 20th. In fact, the Eeyore’s remind us that in the past there have been some big snow storms well into April, too.

Honestly, most of the people I’ve spoken with lately are making the best of it, but just about everyone has complained at just how long this winter has seemed. (One person made me smile when he said “Snow...is a four-letter word.”) So how about this as a way to brighten the dark and cold season---check out all the free (that’s FREE) concerts in our area!

Just this week alone there are amazing options.  Tonight (Wednesday) there’s an all-Faure concert at St. John the Evangelist, 35 Bowdoin Street in Boston, featuring soprano Mary Ann Lanier and pianist James Busby.  Also, at NEC’s Jordan Hall (Gainsborough Street at Huntington Avenue), the NEC Chamber Orchestra, conductorless, is playing music by Arensky, Vanhal and Stravinsky.

And on Thursday, the Mid-Day Recital Series continues at First Church, Boston, 66 Marlboro Street, with harpsichordist Jean Rife (donations accepted).

Then, on the weekend, how about saxophone?  Saturday night at 8, Boston Conservatory’s Seully Hall (8 The Fenway) features a faculty recital of saxophone duos by Lassus.

Look, sitting under the stars on a warm summer’s night with your Valentine it isn’t....but music goes a long way to making the winter brighter. And free....well, that’s just the cherry on our sundae. Hang in there, my friends, March 20th is just 33 days away.

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Brian McCreath Brian McCreath


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