People & Profiles

Walking Through Life With Bruce Feiler

Wednesday, November 17, 2010
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Bruce Feiler

In Walking Through Life With Bruce Feiler, Greater Boston host Emily Rooney talks with Bruce about his epic 10,000-mile journey during the Walking The Bible series, his fight against bone cancer, and how losing his ability to walk had a profound effect on his passion for living.
 

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The True Love Story Of Lady Antonia And Her Harold

By Susan Stamberg   |   Wednesday, November 3, 2010
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At Home With The Gubernatorial Candidates

By Jared Bowen   |   Friday, October 29, 2010
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Oct. 29, 2010

BOSTON — Greater Boston's Jared Bowen spent time with all four candidates for Massachusetts governor. Catch up on Jared's series of at home interviews with Jill Stein, Charlie Baker, Deval Patrick and Tim Cahill.

Oct. 21, 2010: Jill Stein

Greater Boston kicks off a series of at-home interviews with the candidates for Massachusetts governor. First, Jared Bowen gets an exclusive look inside the Lexington home of Green-Rainbow candidate Dr. Jill Stein.


Oct. 26, 2010: Charlie Baker

Jared Bowen visits the Swampscott home of Republican contender Charlie Baker who dishes on everything from his love of peanut butter sandwiches to his love of Aerosmith.


Oct. 27, 2010: Deval Patrick

Jared visits the Milton home of Deval Patrick who talks about making time for family, his historic 2006 campaign, and governing in turbulent times.


Oct. 28, 2010: Tim Cahill

Greater Boston wraps up its series of at home interviews with the candidates for Massachusetts governor. Jared Bowen pays a visit to the Quincy home of state treasurer Tim Cahill who talks about his love of fitness, reading and the moment he learned his running mate was defecting.

Julia Child’s old stomping grounds: Photos from Paris

By Cathy Huyghe   |   Thursday, August 12, 2010
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Julia and Paul Child's address is France was 81 Rue de l'Université, 7th Arrondissement.

In 1963, Julia Child stepped in front of the cameras at WGBH and introduced viewers to the art of French cooking with The French Chef, bringing her passion for French cuisine and inimitable voice to television. The series ran for 10 years, sparking a revolution in both American cooking and TV how-to shows that endures today. A recent trip to Paris gave me a chance to retrace the steps of this iconic, yet supremely relatable, chef and food lover.


Julia and Paul lived on the top two floors of this building.

Imagine if one of the names listed here today, on the call box outside the front blue door, were Child.

The closest Metro stop to the Child’s apartment, looking very much like it would have looked in Julia’s time.

Situated close to Saint Germain des Près, Androuet Fromagerie was back then, and still is today, one of the finest cheese shops in all of Paris.

Androuet’s cheeses range from “workhorses” like Comte to these precious bites, looking like the cheese version of mignardises.

You can’t have Paris without chocolate. Jean-Paul Hévin chocolatier, located on rue Saint Honoré in the 1st arrondissement, is famous for its cheese-filled chocolates.

And you can’t have chocolate — or Paris! — without wine. Le Rubis wine bar, also in the 1st arrondissement, is old, comfortable, and crowded. Their selection of wines by the glass relies on small pours from trustworthy regions.

Cathy Huyghe writes the WGBH Foodie blog. Read new WGBH Foodie posts every weekday, in which Cathy explores myriad ways and places to experience good food and wine.

Mollie Katzen and a Celebration of Spring, with Recipes

By Cathy Huyghe   |   Thursday, August 12, 2010
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The timing couldn’t have been more perfect: it was just the right day, and just the right weather, with just the right sort of food arranged around the right theme, presented by the right person.

That person was Mollie Katzen (of Moosewood Cookbook and restaurant fame), at a recent lunchtime seminar at Dudley House in Harvard Square, organized by Theresa McCulla and the Food Literacy Project at Harvard University.

Herbs were Katzen’s focus, and guests received recipes showcasing herbs for all the dishes available at the lunch: Mediterranean Yogurt, Persian Eggplant Appetizer, Spring Vegetable Herb Salad, Couscous-Quinoa Tabouli, Creamy White Beans, Chimichurri (either with tofu or salmon), and Crispy Sage Leaves.

Katzen — no surprise to anyone who’s used her cookbooks — is at her best with a wide variety of fresh (but not exotic) ingredients, guiding cooks through easy, yet revelatory, preparations.  In addition to their signature Katzen style, the recipes evoke visions of the Mediterranean — the sights, sounds, and tastes travelers will experience on WGBH’s Mediterranean Voyage of Discovery.

For the Mediterranean Yogurt recipe, for example, she uses many ingredients you’d expect such as cilantro, mint, and lemon juice. But then she throws a curveball you never saw coming: dried apricots, giving the recipe all manner of “special something” to it. Whether that came from the apricots, or the mix of herbs, or the raisins, or the walnuts, or the combination of all of those is deliciously hard to tell.

Here’s the recipe. Give it a whirl, and see for yourself.

Mediterranean Yogurt

Reproduced from the handout at Katzen’s lunchtime seminar, “Fun & Creative Uses of Fresh Herbs,” sponsored by Harvard University Dining Services and the Food Literacy Project.

1 medium clove garlic

1/3 cup parsley

1/3 cup cilantro

1/3 cup fresh dill

1/3 cup fresh basil leaves

1/3 cup fresh mint leaves

2 tablespoons fresh thyme

3 or 4 dried apricots (a soft, tart variety)

1/3 cup golden raisins

1/3 cup toasted walnuts

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

Preparation: Place garlic, all herbs, dried fruit, and walnuts in a food processor, and pulse until it forms a paste. Transfer to a bowl and stir in lemon juice and yogurt. Add salt and cayenne to taste. Cover tightly and refrigerate until serving. Just before serving, you can sprinkle a little extra cayenne on top and decorate with small sprigs of parsley and a few walnut halves, for a finished look.

Optional garnishes: a light dusting of cayenne, small sprigs of parsley, and/or walnut halves.

This sauce can be served alone, as an appetizer, or as a light lunch entrée — and it is amazingly compatible with a number of foods. You can serve it as a dip for raw or steamed vegetables, in pita bread with anything and everything, as a sauce for vegetables or grains…the list is endless. Mediterranean Yogurt keeps for about a week in a tightly covered container in the refrigerator.

Cathy Huyghe writes the WGBH Foodie blog. Read new WGBH Foodie posts every weekday, in which Cathy explores myriad ways and places to experience good food and wine.

Anne Amie winemaker dinner at Grill 23

By Judy Lebel   |   Thursday, August 12, 2010
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The last time Thomas Houseman, winemaker for Oregon’s Anne Amie Vineyards, was in Boston, he ran the marathon on Patriot’s Day, 2004.

This time around, Houseman tackled Grill 23, not Heartbreak Hill. This time, on Wednesday, April 14, Houseman was more concerned with his pinot noirs than his mile splits.

The wine dinner at Grill 23 last week was no less intense an effort, however, because it’s the intensity of Anne Amie’s wines that make them work. It’s the intensity that enables Anne Amie’s pinot blanc and pinot noirs to stand up to Grill 23’s award-winning steakhouse cuisine. That’s right, pinot noir – not a cab, not malbec, not sangiovese – with steak.

These are not just any pinot noirs. Most of Anne Amie’s grapes come from two estate vineyards, which are both certified by Salmon Safe and LIVE (Low Input Viticulture and Enology). These organic practices along with intentionally reduced yields give the remaining fruit extraordinary depth and complexity.

Within an hour’s drive of Portland, you find yourself in the Yamhill-Carlton area of Oregon’s famed Willamette Valley.  The mission of this winery, named after owner Dr. Robert Pamplin’s two daughters, is to make memorable wines with a sense of elegance. Grill 23’s wine director, Alex DeWinter, and chef Jay Murray set the table to match that mission.

Dinner began with the 2008 Cuvee A “Amrita,” a jasmine-scented, white-wine blend of six grapes, offering just enough spice on the palate to complement Murray’s fresh California maki rolls and grilled scallop sushi. It’s the perfect fruit-forward quaffer to have at the ready for spring and summer.

For the next course, the lightly grilled, smoked salmon atop a velvety cauliflower puree and ricotta blini would have been tasty enough. But it was the flair of lemon mascarpone that brought out the Meyer lemon and crisp apple nuances of Houseman’s award-winning 2008 pinot gris.

Next up was a warm Rawson Brook chèvre cheesecake with pistou and a robust olive tapenade. With it, Anne Amie’s 2006 pinot noir, bringing berry and mushroom elements that embraced the rich, full flavors of the cheesecake.

Pinot noir is a tempting choice to serve with slow-roasted beef cheeks, especially when they’re served with bacon-wrapped salsify on a bed of forest mushrooms. Anne Amie’s 2004 “La Colina,” from the red volcanic soils of Oregon’s Dundee Hills, worked exceptionally well.

The dinner finished with three local cheeses from New Hampshire and Vermont paired with the elegant 2006 “L’Iris” Pinot Noir, followed by an assortment of mignardises, but I kept coming back to those beef cheeks. If you decide to roast your own beef cheeks, Beacon Hill’s Savenor’s Market will gladly special-order them for you.

Judy Lebel is the guest author for today’s Foodie Blog. Read new WGBH Foodie posts every weekday, where we explore myriad ways and places to experience good food and wine.

About the Authors
Jared Bowen Jared Bowen
Jared Bowen is WGBH’s Emmy Award-winning Executive Editor and Host for Arts. 

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